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When to replace the Rotors


B-Doon

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Quick Question regarding the rotors on my 72. They are stock, do not have any scarring, but the outter lip is slightly higher than the rotor surface...These rotors appear to be stock(original to this vehicle)...Is it time to get new ones?

Secondary question....if I need to/decide to replace the rotors, what parts need to be replaced when removing the hub to get the rotor off? Can any of the hub parts be reused?

thanks,

Brian

72inka

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The difinitve way to know if you need to replace the rotor is to take a measurement of the rotor thickness(at the thinnest point). If it's too thin, replace them.

Cris

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Rotors are cheap enough. It also depends how hard you drive the car. The harder you drive it, the smaller the ridge before you replace.

There are no other parts that need replacing when doing rotors. But you may want to get new pads and bed them in.

BMW rotors do not get turned.

Pierre

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69 2002 (M20), 74 tii, 76 533i, 79 323i, 80 732i, 84 323i (S50) 91 318is, 96 318ti (S52), 97 Z3, 02 330i, 03 525iT, 02 R1150 RTP.
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02 rotors are not very expensive. However thay can be turned provided you do not exceed the minimum thickness. The number is usually engraved on the edge of the rotor. The main issue arising from turning is you remove "meat" and the rotor is more prone to warping if driven hard.

Earl

74 02Lux

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i just did my rotors. seemed cheaper to buy new than take them off, drive them to a machine shop, and have them turned. the only thing you'll need is a way to torque the hex head bolts that hold it onto the hub. pretty easy. you can check your bearing at the same time and clean and re-grease. get a new cotter pin too, that is usually the most difficult part of any project i have ever done! those darned bent up cotter pins.

chuck

1969 Colorado Automatic (converted to 4spd)

1982 528e
1972 BMW R75/5

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If they don't look 100% new, spend the $25.

You do need a new wheel seal, and if you don't know when your

bearings were regreased, it might be a good idea to clean and repack them.

Make sure to leave the nut 'almost loose' in front.

And if you don't know how old the calipers/seals are, I'd put new

seasl in them. If the inside of the bores are rusty, that can kill your nice new

rotors...

Nice, properly functioning stock brakes are quite good indeed...

t

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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Thanks for the advice Toby!

I was initially rebuilding my left front caliper with the seal kit (car was pulling hard upon breaking). That's what prompted my initial question regarding the rotors. I ordered new rotors, and plan to do both at the same time....however, I won't be rebuilding the right side as it was replaced less than 2k miles ago...

Brian

72inka

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Toby et. al,

Do you know about these paper'ish felt pads that go between the pad and the cylinders in the caliper? There were some on the car, but they seemed pretty chewed up. Not sure what they are, or where to get them. They are paper thin and stiff....any idea if those are needed, what they are called, and if they are readily available? I checked real OEM and my haynes manual, but there was no mention of them.....

I appreciate the help! THis is my first time doing brakes....normally I leave it up to the pros, but I new the caliper was going to need work, and it would be easier/cheaper to do it myself...especially knowing project creep would take hold once I got in there....

Thanks!

Brian

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