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Rear subframe mount replacement - at an impasse

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I am hoping to replace my rear subframe mounts without removing the subframe from the body. Per this link:

http://1leadshoe.blogspot.com/2011/01/rear-subframe-mounts.html?m=1

It is possible.

Here's where I am now (both sides)

- the 17 mm bolts that hold the mount to the subframe have been loosened. The bolts are still in place, the nuts have been removed.

- the 17 mm bolt that holds the connecting rod to the body has been removed. The connecting rod is off the vehicle.

- the 22 mm nut that holds the mount to the body has been removed.

24.png

So everything is loose. But how do I get the mount off?? I've given the pins (#8 in that photo) a good whack with a hammer. And I even tried using my jack to jack up the car and loosen them. No go. Moved the car up a couple of inches.

And even if I do get pin loose, how do the bolts (#10 in the photo) come out of the mount? They appear to be blocked!

Thanks!

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That looks like fun. I've not done that, but I can tell you those vertical bolts (#8) have splines on top and are a pig to get out after 50 years. I'd pull the back seat bottom and get some serious penetrating oil in the cavity where they sit. If you hope to salvage them, put nuts on to protect end/threads if you plan to use big hammer. I don't undrestand why horzontal bolts won't come out. Seems odd. Rust perhaps? Do they go through a tube?

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Me, I'd drop the subframe.

Because, having driven out a few of those bolts, it's taken more swing

with a 3 pound copper- faced mallet than I could manage lying upside- down

underneath the car.

AND I've damaged a couple despite some serious care. They're REALLY in there.

If the bolts were put on 'wrong way 'round' last time, then, as you note,

they won't be removable on the car. You can do that with the trailing arm

bolts, too...

what I've found,

t

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Guest Anonymous

I have vague memories from 30 years ago of being able to get the mounts to slide out by jacking the body up from the subframe (I think). Maybe someone who has done it more recently can explain the exact sequence. It might have been easier on a younger car. I recently tried something similar on a car I am dismantling and ended up using a torch and big hammer to finally get it apart.

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HA! That's my blog post..

The big knurled bolts in my car popped out fairly easily. Or rather un-fairly easy, as it sounds. Its KEY, however.. Because the subframe can not angle downward for access to the mounting bolts for the bushings. you need to get them out. After that happens, slowly drop the sub frame with the jack and the bolt heads become available..

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Heads up, though. If your car is midwest rusty, the mounting bolts themselves can be seized in the sleeve that passes though the subframe..

Another Texas car that is in my family (AHEM), was done withe subframe in the car.. the outer bolts were rusted into the sleeves, and we tried heat, hammers, everything. Finally we had to drill a small hole in the tube to get PB into the sleeve. After more heating, beating and PB, they finally relented. NOT AWESOME.

And then there's the rebuild OUT of the car, with rusty bolts. Still not awesome..These took some serious doing. More heat and hammers. What a PIA. Fortunately it was a total tear down and I could move it around..

Before..

IMG_3907.jpg

IMG_3961.jpg

After..

file-2418.jpg

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Thanks folks. Got one out after a serious round of anti-seize. Used the jack against the bolt and it finally popped out. Didn't have time to do the other as I was headed out to dinner.

eurotrash - no, my car's dry. If those pictures show a Texas car, it is one that either came here after some time where it's cold or it's one that sat along the coast for a while. My car is a centra/north Texas car and looks nothing like that. The one mount I did get out is marked 72, so I can assume it's original. Oddly enough, every other bit of rubber on my car was replaced in the last 10 years by the previous owner.

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Thanks folks. Got one out after a serious round of anti-seize. Used the jack against the bolt and it finally popped out. Didn't have time to do the other as I was headed out to dinner.

eurotrash - no, my car's dry. If those pictures show a Texas car, it is one that either came here after some time where it's cold or it's one that sat along the coast for a while. My car is a centra/north Texas car and looks nothing like that. The one mount I did get out is marked 72, so I can assume it's original. Oddly enough, every other bit of rubber on my car was replaced in the last 10 years by the previous owner.

use a torch to heat them up. makes it much easier to get bolts out.

subframe mounts get left in because they are invisible....and they are harder to do than all the rest of the rubber in the car.

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Thanks again, guys - I finished up the project this afternoon. I was afraid to whack 'em too hard. The 02 was taking up most of our garage... any time I do that, I'm on somewhat of a rush schedule since my wife would like her car covered!

Glad you made some head way!

The pics above show a midwestern car. It was ready for some love..

Yep... and the TX car you referenced before was almost definitely not from here originally. Definitely spent some time where there's salt on the roads...

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