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further tune up questions


AlaskaMike

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The car was dying at idle after Friday nights tune-up session, so I knew the timing was whacked.

First, I successfully set the dwell to 60 tonight after four or five quick stabs at getting the gap right.

The timing though.... blech... I wasn't sure which of the three screws (8,9,10 below) was proper for setting the RPMs to 1400 for timing. So I left them alone....

So, I started advancing the timing by ear tonight, and the RPMs went up to ~1400. I then used a timing light and didn't see a ball and was happy to just get it close to freezing the flywheel motion (there are some white marks). The idle RPM ended up about 900 from doing that.

Some Questions For You : )

What is the procedure with those three screws (8,9,10) to increase the RPMs to 1400 before timing?! Do I change the one that says "Do not adjust" ?? Any strategy for figuring the best settings for those screws?

I have never used a timing light before. One one side of proper timing, does it look like the marks are whizzing in one direction, and on the other side of proper timing does it look like the marks are going in the other

direction? Should the ball be seen when motion is stopped in the middle?

It's a digital timing light, can I use the adjustable advance on the light to search the flywheel for the metal ball once I've frozen its apparent motion?

TIA !!

Mike

post-15949-1366759870091_thumb.jpg

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The pic is too fuzzy for mee to say, but the screw to turn puts pressure on the linkage (as though you are putting your foot on the gas pedal). Then crank up the revs to 1400rpm.

Often the metal ball is covered in crud - an icecream stick, jammed really slowly down the timing hole will clean off the crud (some have used a small stiff brush). Be sure to only 'polish' the top of the ball cos' that all you want to see with the timing light. its an art to hold the light at the right angle to see the ball and reach the dizzy all at the same time. Once you do sight the ball, readjust the revs to 1400rpm and find the ball again - repeat until you see the ball and revs are at 1400rpm.

Hope this helps. Beaner7102

1971 - 2002 RHD VIN 1653940. Agave (stock with Pertronix & 32/36 Weber) - "Cactus"

1972 - 1602 RHD VIN 1554408. Fjord (with 2L motor, 5spd & LSD - Weber 40/40 to come) - "Bluey"

1984 - E30 318i VIN WBAAK320208722176 - stock daily driver

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Thanks... that does help. You can click on the picture to make it bigger if you want. Sounds like I do not need to touch all those red underlined screws though at all.

Here are a couple total newbie questions...

If the timing is off, is the ball always still "frozen" in time, just possibly out of sight of the viewing window?

You are supposed to unplug vacuum advance, what is done for mechanical advance, that would be ever-present yes?

Does cylinder 1 fire once every 2 flywheel rotations? Is the timing light illuminating every other rotation of the flywheel?

Mike

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02timingmarkandheadboltsequence.jpg

yes - remove the vacuum hose to the distributor if it has any during the 1400 rpm check

do not 'dial' in any advance on the timing light - just leave it at "o" or off

'86 R65 650cc #6128390 22,000m
'64 R27 250cc #383851 18,000m
'11 FORD Transit #T058971 28,000m "Truckette"
'13 500 ABARTH #DT600282 6,666m "TAZIO"

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Two additional points.

Here's a picture of the Solex idle adjust screw - No. 4. It's the screw the throttle linkage rests on when gas pedal is released. Move the throttle linkage near the carb by hand, and you'll see it.

Be sure to plug the distributor vacuum advance hose when removed.

post-9429-13667598702288_thumb.jpg

1976 2002 Inka

2008 M5 Sapphire Black Metallic, 6-speed

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OK so I ..

1) disconnect vacuum advance, plug the carb side of the line (distributor end can be open)

2) idle car up to 1400 rpm with that screw

3) use timing light and turn distributor to place the shiny ball

(idle changes)

4) repeat steps 2-3 until ball is centered and idle stays at 1400

So I take it the idle will change less with each iteration.

Mike

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Yup.

was happy to just get it close to freezing the flywheel motion

This makes me think that your distributor has worn- out mechanical advance

bits and/ or too much end play.

The light should be 'stable', i.e. hit the same spot every revolution.

If the flywheel's 'jumping' around, that's a sure sign of unstable timing.

Which leads to rough idle, among other things.

Have I said that I dislike the 'ball' system of timing?

t

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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.....or the points aren't installed correctly? - not mounted flat on to the

base plate?, or the points aren't aligned ? or the point cam lobes are scored - worn badly?

'86 R65 650cc #6128390 22,000m
'64 R27 250cc #383851 18,000m
'11 FORD Transit #T058971 28,000m "Truckette"
'13 500 ABARTH #DT600282 6,666m "TAZIO"

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