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To buy (or not to buy) a rebuilt head... Advice?


CutteRug

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Hi all,

My car runs okay, but when I come off the accelerator on a downhill slope, or there's ever any substantial back pressure (like downshifting into those second gear turns, hee hee) I get a LOT of smoky oil smell..

I've been told that my valve guides are going bad. So here's the question.. There's one listed on craigslist for $250..

http://sfbay.craigslist.org/sfc/pts/944620869.html

Is that a good price? Is there anyway to check it for being rebuilt or machined *properly*? Is a new head even what I need? Will it still be ridiculously expensive to swap them if I buy this??

Okay, that was more than one question ;-)

Thanks for any input or expertise any of you can shine on this subject.

Adam

(==\___| SQARY02|___/==)

1975 Millie the Falcon (Originally Polaris, currently Primer-Grey/Spa-Blue)

1975 Eamon the Golden Nugget (Originally Golf, currently several other yellows, someday Dakar)

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Is there a reason you don't just have whatever work your current head needs done? I needed valve work done not long ago and got the valve job, a couple of new valves, all new guides and seals and a gasket set for about $530. More expensive clearly, but it was what my head needed, and it was covered by the machine shop if anything wasn't right.

Steve E.

www.theportabledad.com

1974 Sahara 2002

1974 R75/6 (Sold!) :(

This is a fertile land, and we will thrive. We will rule over all this land, and we will call it…This Land

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I guess I'll try that... It's just that every time I talk to my mechanic, he only seems to be able to talk in numbers like *one thousand* or *two thousand*.. He's a great bimmer mechanic, but has gotten spoiled and no longer relishes the "bargain-seeking" 02 owner.. (like myself)

Didn't think a redone head would be so affordable... (and didn't think I'd ever be referring to prices over $500 as affordable ;-)

Anyway, thanks! I'll ask him about it next time I'm down there.

(==\___| SQARY02|___/==)

1975 Millie the Falcon (Originally Polaris, currently Primer-Grey/Spa-Blue)

1975 Eamon the Golden Nugget (Originally Golf, currently several other yellows, someday Dakar)

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I would buy the head, but I just think that way.

It's cheap enough that's it's almost worth the gamble

sight unseen.

Before I paid money, though, I'd measure it (129mm is about stock thickness)

and put a straightedge on both the top and the bottom.

And look at the cam, rockers, etc if included.

Ideally, I like to evaluate heads with the cam loose- if the cam's easy to install

and turns freely, and the thickness is 128.5mm or more, it's almost always

a winner-

if there aren't any cracks... So if it doesn't include a cam, that's

almost better, since you can pop one in and give it a quick spin.

(I've found that a little friction's ok, but if you can't turn the end flange by

hand, then it might be best to try again somewhere else)

And around here, new guides and a valve job on a loose head tends to run in

the $6-700 category.

t

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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Excellent! Lol...

It'd be great if everyone said completely contradicting things, so I can end up even MORE confused..

Just razzin. Thanks again guys. In life there is rarely a simple answer or consensus.

Cheers,

Adam

(==\___| SQARY02|___/==)

1975 Millie the Falcon (Originally Polaris, currently Primer-Grey/Spa-Blue)

1975 Eamon the Golden Nugget (Originally Golf, currently several other yellows, someday Dakar)

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Bill Arnold in San Rafael... (and I may have exaggerated a bit on the multi-thousand dollar quotes.. But he's not cheap)

Cheers,

Adam

(==\___| SQARY02|___/==)

1975 Millie the Falcon (Originally Polaris, currently Primer-Grey/Spa-Blue)

1975 Eamon the Golden Nugget (Originally Golf, currently several other yellows, someday Dakar)

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oog.

Me being me, I'd go look at it and haggle, but if you really

don't know what you're looking AT, walking away isn't a mistake.

There are a lot of things that could be wrong that would leave you

with a doorstop instead of a head.

t

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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