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Kidasters

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Well - I'm 90% there on my latest project. This started with a Tii booster upgrade, and snowballed.

Ended up with the following:

Tii Booster

Tii Master Cylinder

1 new brake line (needed 1 longer line)

TEP rear battery rack

battery disconnect switch

The hardest part was drilling the hole through the firewall - just cause it's emotionally hard to drill holes.

I love the Tii master. Pedal feels way more solid.

Still have to drill the shock towers to bolt the rack in all the way, but the tie-wraps will keep it from sliding around for now.

Ken

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FAQ Member # 2616

"What do you mean NEXT project?"

-- My wife.

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Nice work. I like how you got the right sticker for the new MC. Looks like a really clean car.

Personally I wouldn't drill the rear shock towers, as that battery brace will not add any structural integrity to the rear towers...drilling will only add a potential spot for rust. I owned a brace like that but sold it and got a little basket for my battery...still drilled in but not in the feared shock towers.

2ur0daf.jpg

70 M2 2.5L 

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Personally I wouldn't drill the rear shock towers, as that battery brace will not add any structural integrity to the rear towers...

What? Are you saying that a tower brace adds no structure? Thats the whold point of one (with the added bonus of a moved battery)

Yes, I am saying it adds no structure. A solid street car won't flex much there, and if it does, that brace won't do much. It's simply not tied in enough to make a difference.

Now a car with a roll cage welded into the floor plus suppports at the top of the towers, that's another story.

But it is a pretty battery brace.

70 M2 2.5L 

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Personally I wouldn't drill the rear shock towers, as that battery brace will not add any structural integrity to the rear towers...

What? Are you saying that a tower brace adds no structure? Thats the whold point of one (with the added bonus of a moved battery)

Yes, I am saying it adds no structure. A solid street car won't flex much there, and if it does, that brace won't do much. It's simply not tied in enough to make a difference.

Now a car with a roll cage welded into the floor plus suppports at the top of the towers, that's another story.

But it is a pretty battery brace.

I never really believed in the bolt in rear battery braces either... for the very same reasons.. And since I grew up going on family road trips in my parent's Tii with the trunk packed to the gills I never understood taking up precious trunk space with a brace OR a battery either for that matter.... My batteries are going under the back seat.... :b.....

Tom Jones

BMW mechanic for over 25 years, BMWCCA since 1984
66 BMW16oo stored, 67 1600-2 lifelong project, 2 more 67-8 1600s, 86 528e 5sp 585k, 91 318i
Mom&Dad's, 65 1800TiSA, 70 2800, 72 2002Tii 2760007 orig owners, 15 Z4 N20

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Didn't mean to get everyone fired up. Just proud of my latest work.

Just for clarification - I didn't install the rack for rigidity. I installed it because I thought it looked cool, and was an easy way to run a stock size battery (I can't weld, so I can't do what Bill Williams did).

What I do love is not having the battery up front. Changing the filter on oil changes just got an order of magnitude easier!

But - reading the feedback here, and on the other thread, I'm re-considering putting holes in my nice, rust free shock towers. Maybe we'll just make those some "temporary permanent" tie wraps, or I'll replace them with some stainless steel bands. Plus - I had enough angst drilling holes in the firewall. And - I'm sick of seeing the car on jackstands. Just want to drive it for a bit now.

Later,

Ken

FAQ Member # 2616

"What do you mean NEXT project?"

-- My wife.

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