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Hood Rod - central spring


zambo
Go to solution Solved by zambo,

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Before I launch into the reassembly of this piece - now nearly too pretty to put back into the car - I thought I’d check in with the group. I’ve only just started with central spring and assume that I do the two outer pins and then tackle single  roll pin that tensions the spring. 
 

Question is, is there a trick to the tensioning part. Haven’t had a crack at doing it yet but thought I’d check in here first to make sure the order is correct so that I’m not removing pins to start at a different point. 
 

Thanks as always to those that assist. My car is in final paint this morning Oz time - so pretty exciting stuff putting it back together, just ahead. 
 

Richard 

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I installed the outer two pins first, then the center pin. I don’t remember what I used to tension the spring, but it didn’t require much force. Honestly I think I just did it by hand. It’s only lightly tensioned on the bar, the spring gets the real load when it’s latched. 

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3 hours ago, Lucky 7 said:

I installed the outer two pins first, then the center pin. I don’t remember what I used to tension the spring, but it didn’t require much force. Honestly I think I just did it by hand. It’s only lightly tensioned on the bar, the spring gets the real load when it’s latched. 

Thanks for that. Did you put the last pin in perhaps using the end pieces as “handles” to stop the bar spinning whilst your tensioned the spring “hook”? I mean to tuck the spring in behind the central roll pin the hook part needs to travel about 1/4 the circumference of your bar. 
 

IMG_5771.thumb.jpeg.74724eb0da41d31e60de3c08549640aa.jpeg

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16 hours ago, Lucky 7 said:

I installed the outer two pins first, then the center pin. I don’t remember what I used to tension the spring, but it didn’t require much force. Honestly I think I just did it by hand. It’s only lightly tensioned on the bar, the spring gets the real load when it’s latched. 

I’ve thought about this overnight here and after looking at the pics online I believe there are two springs - if others knew this sorry I’m late to the party. This pic I assume is like yours (requiring little to no tension) with all pin bearing points on the spring on one plain. 
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whereas the majority I’ve seen including the two bars I disassembled show a central pin bearing point 180 degrees out from where the outer tabs are located. This one is mine pre-disassembly. 
 

IMG_4732.thumb.jpeg.77c680c6d274780fca6e79eddc495fe3.jpeg

 

 

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  • Solution

To close this out and in case anyone else trawling thru these pages has the same issue I raised - i.e. how to control the bar turning whilst  tensioning the spring - these pics explain the solution. 


Might need a second pair of hands to knock the pin in whilst one person keeps tension on the spring.
 

Important small element is the little screw that passes through the bar (where the second spring attaches) - it needs to long enough to wedge itself against the inner section of the vice when you initially turn the bar - it totally stops any subsequent bar turn.

 

Minor side aspect is discovering there are two springs developed for the same bar with one clearly needing virtually no tensioning to install. 

 

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Edited by zambo
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Guessing you got it all sorted. Just gonna say Wallothnesch sells that assembly, complete. Wish I had known that before I did what you are doing, your looks spectacular! Always disappointing to see that part assembly grime covered and over sprayed . . . need any more roll pins?

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1 hour ago, jerryasi said:

Guessing you got it all sorted. Just gonna say Wallothnesch sells that assembly, complete. Wish I had known that before I did what you are doing, your looks spectacular! Always disappointing to see that part assembly grime covered and over sprayed . . . need any more roll pins?

Thanks. Didn’t know W&N sold it. I’ll check that out.
 

It does look great for something you generally can’t see, but I decided for the stuff that’s a pain to remove (to repair/refurb)  and can damage paintwork in the process, I’d do it once (and right) then reinstall and forget about. 
 

This bar was all splattered with red paint and as my car is chamonix and has a new coat of paint on it completed just two days back, it had to be cleaned up. I had stuff going to the platers so seemed a no-brainer to get it done and offer it some protection from the elements. 
 

Roll pins - I’ve still got a few leftover 👍

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On 12/15/2023 at 5:35 PM, SplitDash said:

@zambo How do you get it so nice looking? Just polish or did you get it coated ?

 

Nice work 😎

Thanks SplitDash - yes they were zinc plated recently when I had the various components apart and had them treated with some other bits. Only the bar is silver zinc, rest yellow. Spindle thingo that holds the steel wire I hit with a gun metal epoxy paint. 

Edited by zambo
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On 12/15/2023 at 1:45 PM, jerryasi said:

so, let's see the fresh paint?


… these are just a few from a Saturday morning visit to the shop. Not great because a) it was still wrapped up to prevent overspray into the boot (trunk) and engine bay which had been done prior and b) I couldn’t get easy access to it in the shop.
 

It’s going to have the orange peel buffed out tomorrow (Monday) so will get better access after that I hope. 

 

 

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Edited by zambo
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