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Intake Manifold puddle


iridium56

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Ok. Still having issues with getting the engine to crank.

Checked the timing, checked to make sure there is a spark, replaced the spark plugs (they were fouled with carbon, number 3 and 4 were wet with gas), still no crank but turns over fine.

So, I gave up and took off the Carburetor (32/36 dgav) to look and see if it was put back together (if something is wrong in assembly) correctly.

I have been reading the braden book but it doesn't mention this issue, and I searched the FAQ to no avail.

Here is my question: I noticed that when I took the carburetor off, inside the intake manifold, directly under the carb, there is a depressed area directly under where the carb bolts up on the inside of the intake manifold (when you stare directly down the peanut or separate intake holes) and there was a "puddle" of gas in that "depressed" area.

Is that normal? (If it sounds too confusing I can post pics tonight)

Thoughts or facts are greatly appreciated since I've never seen this occur in another vehicle.

SIDE NOTE: after I double check everything I am taking the carb to a mechanic who allegedly "knows how to work on Webers," he is going to check and make sure that I put that thing back together correctly.

76 Georgia Project

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By 'crank' you mean fire, right?

If you're getting no combustion at all (not even a sputter)

I'd try starting fluid to confirm that spark really is good and

happening at the right time.

Gas at the bottom of the carb isn't necessarily unusual if you're cranking away

and the engine's not running. As long as the float level's set right

and the float valve's not leaking, it shouldn't leak fuel directly into

the manifold. But if you've had the choke closed, it really can pull a lot

of gas...

hth,

t

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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Guest Anonymous

first... shoot some starting fluid while cranking... if the engine lights off... then you know it's a fuel problem.. if it doesn't then you know it's an ignition problem... fix the ignition problem first then move to the fuel...

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the pooling really should not be there. You should make sure the auxilliary venturies have not started to spin around as well.

Make sure the fuel pressure is not too high. no more than 3 psi.

check for spark first

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Guest Anonymous
the pooling really should not be there. You should make sure the auxilliary venturies have not started to spin around as well.

Make sure the fuel pressure is not too high. no more than 3 psi.

check for spark first

I agree that fuel should not pool anywhere except for the fuel bowl in the carburetor. However, it is so simple to accomplish by repeatedly depressing the accelerator pedal so as to activate the accelerator pump, the puddling is really a non issue unless the carb is involuntarily leaking. As others have suggested, with the choke on, the puddle may even get bigger. Even if an auxiliary venturi is loose and has spun, you should be able to get the engine to run off of the idle and choke system, but beyond that, engine operation will be sub par at any throttle change.

If your engine will not fire and show signs of running - I would look to ignition issues, such as a loose wire, a bad condenser/coil, maladjusted points or even maladjusted timing. Tell us you are getting a nice fat blue spark at your plugs and go from there.

This is as common an issue with most carb cars. Good luck!

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