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s14 vs s52


Pie21

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I think its not that much, I'm not sure, some engine guru will be able to tell you.

holy negative camber batman!!!

02 Golf Yellow cruising the border of NSW/VIC!

tii pistons, 293, double valve springs, 40mm DCOE's, sump baffle, sway bars, lowered, 5spd, big brakes, 3pc wheels, bucket seats. Approx 150+hp

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Engine info..

S50 B30 USA (3.0L USA M3 engine)

S52 US (3.2L USA M3 engine)

S50 B30 (3.0L Euro M3 motor)

S50 B32 (3.2L Euro M3 motor)

There were some differences depending on the market in regard to compression ratios, but this will probably help....

Are you looking for a Euro motor or US motor?

-Justin
--
'76 02 (USA), '05 Toyota Alphard (Tokyo) - http://www.bmw2002.net

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From Bimmerfourms Engine FAQ's, the S14 weighs 234lbs and the euro S50 weighs 333lbs.

The euro S50 has dual vanos, ITB's, solid lifters, etc... The intake on the engine is HUGE. It was an interesting experience to fit an S50B32 into my E30.

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Yes, both the M52tu and M54 are MUCH better for weight. When it comes to power, the cash is the only limiting factor. No reason to use an iron block when an aluminum one can hold the same amount of horsepower that you'd ever dream to afford with a rebuild. Just do a google search for the weight. There's a list of motors and specs (including weight) out there somewhere.

Michael Rose

'91 Porsche 964
'00 Dodge Durango
'13 Honda Pilot

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I tried it with an M54 in my garage and did everything the hard way but learned a lot about how to do it right if I ever win the lottery or move next door to.....

Paul Cain is the only documented success using an M54. Do a search for info on that one.

Every one of these builds I've seen is majorly different because frankly it's not a good fit for the car. It'll make more sense (what's involved) if you are gutsy enough (or stupid enough) like I was to actually acquire the motor and wedge it in your firewall-less engine bay and just sit in the garage for hours, contemplating all the downstream changes you'll have to make to the car. You don't just throw it in and splice in the wiring. Pretty much everything about your car will need to be custom, or if you're just a hack job artist like Terry Sayther, you'll just say screw it and use an e36 unibody bottom end including subframe and graft the pretty 2002 body on top.

I'm all about having a unique car, but unless you just have about $30k to blow and have a pro do it, it just isn't worth it. You'll have a unique and fast (straight line) car, but the smooth hulk of a motor that even the aluminum block is just wouldn't do the old 2002 justice. There are much better alternatives using a lighter motor (built M10, S14, or even M20) that'll yield great results.

Michael Rose

'91 Porsche 964
'00 Dodge Durango
'13 Honda Pilot

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M20 is already a tigt fit in a 2002 engine bay. So mch, that people remove the rad support core. The M50 line of motors is 2" longer. It would e interesting to swap, but a lot of work. Don't forget the e34 oil pan...

Massivescript_specs.jpg

Brake harder. Go faster.

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Wrong and wrong, lol.

Do the math douche.

Fully dressed M10. Used a spring scale with +/- 1lb accuracy. But I made a mistake since this was the first time using a scale like this and I left the motor up in the air attached to the scale for 10 min before taking the picture. After I took the motor off, the scale was reading 9lbs even though i had zeroed it out before starting. So in essence the scale had a 9lb preload.

cimg2084.jpg

cimg2086.jpg

Fully dressed alum M52. I did not take this picture. Although the person who did stated he was missing the wiring harness and throttle body. I estimate those two parts at a combined 10lbs.

alumm52_345lbs.jpg

So 345 lbs for the M10 and ~340 lbs for the alum M52. So youre right I was wrong, the alum M52 is actually ~5lbs lighter than an M10.

And I assumed cutting out the radiator core support was a given for this type of project.

Just because you failed, doesnt mean that other people will.

1990 325i

1976 2002

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