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My "Rolling (someday) Resto" 1967 1600


PSloan

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So, I've rededicated myself to my project car after spending much time on my e30 - and too much time watching TV and goofing off on the internet.

The car:

1967 BMW 1600

Turf green in color

It hasn't been driven since 1981.

Cool features:

Early chrome dash

6V electrical system

Mechanical clutch

Long neck differential

Strange blue interior

The plans:

So, this is where I need opinions. I want this to be a rolling restoration - so obviously I need to get it safely driving.

So far, this is my order of operations:

1. Rear suspension and brakes (including the diff and half shafts)

2. Front suspension and brakes

3. Painting the underbody

4. Engine (Including cooling, ect)

5. Driveline

6. Exhaust

OK - so there's the entire underside. The car should be drivable. Now, to make me proud to drive it.

7. Interior (Only because i love the patina)

8. Paint

Does that sound reasonable? Is there anything I'm missing?

Patrick Sloan

1975 inka 2002 - 2375719

1991 325iC

2001 325i

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First update:

I gutted the interior - all the time worrying that I'd find rust everywhere.

Good news! The pedal box is clean. The floors look great - but I haven't lifted the tar. I found some surface rust under the rear seat but we'll see what comes of it when I sand it off. The hoff kinks have no rust either - which is a good thing as well. Overall, I'm pleased.

Yesterday I put her up on jackstands and soaked the suspension with pb blaster. I'm going to drop the rear soon. All sorts of spiders were living in my drums. I'm going to order the rear bushings today and get a rig set up to clean the subframe via electrolysis. I'm also going to be faced with the challenge of rebuilding my early half shafts.

I'll try to update often - but my goal is to work on her only once a week - so progress will be slow and steady.

post-635-1366759587236_thumb.jpg

Patrick Sloan

1975 inka 2002 - 2375719

1991 325iC

2001 325i

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Patrick,

I am interested in finding out how you are going to rebuild your halfshafts and if parts are even available, my `69 hasn't been driven since `89 and the boots are ripped and exposed. Thanks.

HBChris

`73 3.0CS Chamonix, `69 2000 NK Atlantik

`70 2800 Polaris, `79 528i Chamonix

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You and I share the same interests!! My boots are torn but everything seems to be tight otherwise. What sucks about these early cars is sites like realoem can't be counted on!

EDIT: you seem to have a 2002. Only 1600's with the long neck differentials have half shafts like mine. Have a look in Harrison Krix's blog - he documents his half shaft rebuild well.

Patrick Sloan

1975 inka 2002 - 2375719

1991 325iC

2001 325i

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Wow, that's an interesting interior color. Never seen that before.

Looks like a great project, though. Or maybe I'm just partial to 1600's now. :)

I have the same wheel dollies under my car, so that I can roll it around the garage. They're really nice if you have a non-running car. Especially the ability to push it straight sideways up next to the wall if you need extra room.

'70 1600 - Chamonix - 2.0L + 5-speed

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That's exactly how it was until yesterday.

May as well update my findings. Mostly good news!

Brake lines: Supple and in good shape!

Rotors: Like new!

Wheel bearings: all smooth, no play

Calipers: all external rubber supple. No leaks. Pads are good!

Wheel cylinders: Same as above.

I'm going to leave the brakes for now and just flush them out heavily.

The bad news:

My center track rod's ball joints aren't the best - and the idler arm bushings are worn.

Patrick Sloan

1975 inka 2002 - 2375719

1991 325iC

2001 325i

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Good to know. I had no idea. does yours also have single circuit brakes?

Incase anyone was wondering what was going on - I recently purchased a well maintained 67 1600 motor that I will be installing soon. Mine was replaced by the PO with a 2L. He apparently intended to race the car but never did anything else to it.

Patrick Sloan

1975 inka 2002 - 2375719

1991 325iC

2001 325i

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Yes, early 2002s have single circuit brakes. I am changing mine out to use the `78 to`83 e21 single circuit calipers with solid rotors (I don't need the e21 vented rotors). This give you a larger disc pad and the only mod is a short fixed line from the caliper and then the flex hose to the solid line at the wheel well housing. I can also use the e21 single circuit master cylinder by just changing the grommets that hold the reservoir that sits on the master, again this is something found on the early 2002s (grommet size 22/8 in mm, part # 34311121911). Rear drums are the normal 9 inch drums, not the earlier 8 inchers.

HBChris

`73 3.0CS Chamonix, `69 2000 NK Atlantik

`70 2800 Polaris, `79 528i Chamonix

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Guest Anonymous
Patrick,

I am interested in finding out how you are going to rebuild your halfshafts and if parts are even available, my `69 hasn't been driven since `89 and the boots are ripped and exposed. Thanks.

If any of you guys come up near the DFW area, there is a company that rebuilds axle shafts, drive shafts and steering racks. They charge around 45 bux for the axle. I've had all 4 axle shafts on my e30ix rebuilt and they do an awesome job. Hope this helps!

Their # is 817.277.4097 and they're in Arlington, TX. Hope this helps!

t3hmike @ g mail . com

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Sitting on the floor of my garage is the motor from this car:

http://www.only02.com/1968-BMW-1600-Chamonix_df_31.html

I also got a new mechanical clutch disc and pressure plate.

Throughout the week im going to clean, reseal and paint the motor where needed.

I have more goodies in the mail too!

Incase anyone is wondering about the brakes - I inspected everything and it's all in good working order. I bled the entire system and it should be good to go! My suspension is "safe" but somewhat worn. I think when I pull the old motor I'm going to rebuild the front with new bushings, shocks, and tie rods. However, all of the tie rods, ball joints, ect seem tight right now.

Patrick Sloan

1975 inka 2002 - 2375719

1991 325iC

2001 325i

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