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Weber 32/36 DGV jet & tube options


thomasfrei

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I have recently had a 1972 2002 restored, and am at the point where i'm trying to fine tune the engine. I have not disassembled the carburetor that I'm presently using-- I will will certainly do that at some point to see what I already have. Right now I would simply like to have some suggestions from someone who has a fair amount of carburetor experience as to where they might start with the various components:

main jets

main air correction jets

emulsion tubes (does anyone actually experiment with these?)

idle jets

I have a spare, old 32/36 which I can rebuild and just swap off the factory new one that is on the car now. A little more information:

Engine is recently rebuilt to 9.5 compression. 284 Schrick cam. Intake valves opened up to 46mm. Head not really ported, but gasket matched. All suggestions welcome! Thanks.

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If you have a DGV carb, then I would start out with this

Primary Idle 60

Secondary Idle 50

Primary Main 140

Secondary Main 140

Primary Air 170

Secondary Air 160

The emulsion tubes in yours, i think are F6 and F50. You can play around to see if changing them around makes a difference.

Overseas Auto

Vancouver BC

1-800-665-5031

always on MSN z5551212@hotmail.com

www.overseas-auto.com

www.weberjets.com

www.piaalights.com

www.thejimhilton.com

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I stumbled across this jetting in an eighties roundel, and it is great. No flat spots, comes off idle strong, and keeps pulling. Might be a little rich, but thats better than lean to me!

Primary Secondary

Main Jet 150 165

Air Jet 165 170

Emulsion Tube F8 F8

I'm running 50 idles.

This working out also depends on engine condition HTH

Larry

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Further questions on the 32/36. Weber literature makes a pretty big deal about progression holes being covered by the edge of the throttle plate. On both my units (the new one & the old one) the progression holes are not all in the same plane, and for the most part sit obviously ABOVE the closed throttle. Has anyone else observed this? Also, when is the throttle plate ever completely closed? That would be equivalent to having the throttle adjusting screw backed all the way out-- my car won't run like that. Should it? Finally, why is there an idle jet on the secondary unit-- doesn't the secondary come into play only when you pretty much floor the accelerator-- far from an idling situation. Thanks.

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Float Level 40mm

PRIMARY

idle 60

main 140

air correction 145

SECONDARY

idle 55

main 170

air correction 175

works very nice.

AND seal off the over-enrichment passage with a

tiny dab of metal epoxy on the secondary side.

WEBERprescriptionplughole31a.jpg

WEBERprescriptionplughole31photoB.jpg

and none of the above is wurth a damm if you

don't use a timing light, adjust the valves, have good

compression, and your throttle linkage doesn't give

you FULL OPENING at the carb stop with the pedal to the floor.

'86 R65 650cc #6128390 22,000m
'64 R27 250cc #383851 18,000m
'11 FORD Transit #T058971 28,000m "Truckette"
'13 500 ABARTH #DT600282 6,666m "TAZIO"

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Float Level 40mm

PRIMARY

idle 60

main 140

air correction 145

SECONDARY

idle 55

main 170

air correction 175

works very nice.

Hey CD,

I'm going with your prescription, and you forgot to mention to block off the calibrated orifice on top of the secondary barrel. By the way, what do you use to plug it?

Thanks,

Jan1968

73 inka

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