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Replacing the Rear Clip?


Colin

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It couldnt be too hard, whenever I look at the rear clip it looks like it would be much easier than the nose!

holy negative camber batman!!!

02 Golf Yellow cruising the border of NSW/VIC!

tii pistons, 293, double valve springs, 40mm DCOE's, sump baffle, sway bars, lowered, 5spd, big brakes, 3pc wheels, bucket seats. Approx 150+hp

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It couldnt be too hard, whenever I look at the rear clip it looks like it would be much easier than the nose!

Yeah it looks alright for the most part. Its the bit behind the bumper that I sort of wonder about.

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same as in a roundie, I am assuming you mean the rear body panel. Rear clip would include the quarters and part of the floor, which is much more difficult.

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Great pics, thanks. I did mean the rear panel, sorry. So there is a seam that runs all the way down? What about the vertical piece that houses the trunk latch? How did you deal with that?

Thanks again!

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Great pics, thanks. I did mean the rear panel, sorry. So there is a seam that runs all the way down? What about the vertical piece that houses the trunk latch? How did you deal with that?

Thanks again!

the panel is spot welded on the sides and the bottom. The spots are very easy to get to, once you remove paint and seam sealers you will find the dimples. The center stiffener is welded to both the floor and the rear body panel, if I remember right we chose to remove it completely, and re attach it to the new panel ( don't know why) . It appears that you could just separated it from the rear body panel and re-welded to the new one.

FAQ Member # 91

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Here's how I replaced my trunk floor and tail panel. The vertical piece you referred to is part of the tail panel. If you buy a new tail panel, it is included.

http://www.2002tii-restoration.org/projects/trunk_tail.htm

trunk_800_20.jpg

Great blog you have there! It looks pretty straight forward from your pics. So to remove, its just drilling out the spot welds? Is the only seam I need to cut the braised piece at the tops?

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