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Headliner Installation


Roundeie

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Before installing the headliner I laid down Dynamat. There have been many discussions regarding branding and I chose what was convenient for me. The shop completing my body work helped source what I needed. I decided to glue some EZ Kool to the roof and also use it for the engine bay and to cover the cabin Dynamat. Where i live it will help to reduce the interior temperature as much as possible. This car does not currently have an AC installed.

 

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Before cutting out the sunroof portion

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After...UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_3f.jpg

 

I'll glue it in tomorrow and let it cure this coming week. I do have the Wurth glue but will probably just go to Lowes and pick up a can of Weldwood and some brushes.

 

 

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I have this to do on mine over the coming months. 

 

I noticed you haven't reinstalled the ventilation bit at the rear ?  Is that the accepted wisdom when installing a new headlining ?  It probably makes the job much easier.

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Great job!  I am going to do one of those at some point...   The gluing intimidates me a bit.

Edited by martind5
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7 hours ago, 1Eighteen said:

I noticed you haven't reinstalled the ventilation bit at the rear ?  Is that the accepted wisdom when installing a new headlining ?  It probably makes the job much easier.

 

Uh, what ventilation bit at the rear???

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15 minutes ago, Roundeie said:

 

Uh, what ventilation bit at the rear???

Correct - sunroof models have the headliner glued to the rear window opening.

 

Non-sunroof models have a cardboard-like shelf that the headliner gets glued to.

 

By the way - you are doing a fantastic job!  +1 on using the Weldbond contact adhesive.

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6 hours ago, Roundeie said:

 

Uh, what ventilation bit at the rear???

 

Ah, OK.  So, I have to tackle that then !!!  Is that really needed or can I just forget to reinstate it !!!

 

 

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1 hour ago, 1Eighteen said:

 

Ah, OK.  So, I have to tackle that then !!!  Is that really needed or can I just forget to reinstate it !!!

 

 

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I'm guessing this car has an aftermarket sunroof.  Large opening toward the rear possibly a Webasto? Factory sunroof 2002's did not have the rear assist grab handles as shown.

Edited by jgerock
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I couldn't keep the liner to stay put on that rear lip. It kept pulling off the inside. I ended up putting pinch trim over it. Worked perfectly & not noticeable.

 

Scott

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Nice work!  I did much the same when I renovated the interior of my '72 MBZ last year.  First a UK product called Peacemat that is a rubberized sound isolation, instead of bitumen-based.  Much cleaner and works great.  I also covered the Peacemat with EZ Cool.  Great product.

I am thinking to do the same for my Tii...

I see that for the doors, you put the Dynamat on the surface facing the interior.

It certainly avoids risk of an isolation panel coming loose and obstructing the window mechanism. 

Can anyone comment:  Is this where most folks attach the isolation on the doors? 

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@ Roundeie

My car is a 1600 non-sunroof model and it has the cardboard piece. I too am wondering if I should use it or bypass it and go directly to the rear window channel as the clips for the board are like 7 bucks a piece. Also, let us know how the Weldwood works out. The can says you do NOT need to use any clamping, and that if you let it tack up for at least 20 minutes it bonds on ... contact. I really don't feel like buying 180 binder clips.

 

As for the sound deadener (sp) I am using eastwood's xmat seems to be nice product for less money than dynamat. Adhesive toward the metal. I am using their non bitumin foam sound deadener for the floor and bulkheads.

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On ‎25‎/‎02‎/‎2017 at 5:07 AM, heinemann said:

@ Roundeie

My car is a 1600 non-sunroof model and it has the cardboard piece. I too am wondering if I should use it or bypass it and go directly to the rear window channel as the clips for the board are like 7 bucks a piece. Also, let us know how the Weldwood works out. The can says you do NOT need to use any clamping, and that if you let it tack up for at least 20 minutes it bonds on ... contact. I really don't feel like buying 180 binder clips.

 

As for the sound deadener (sp) I am using eastwood's xmat seems to be nice product for less money than dynamat. Adhesive toward the metal. I am using their non bitumin foam sound deadener for the floor and bulkheads.

 

I think the cardboard bit at the rear is for air circulation, to stop stale air in the cabin.  I'm not sure how effective it actually is.  I only pointed it out, since I will be doing this myself soon too and was hoping it could be deleted, because it looks like a real pain to put back !!! 

 

However, I've decided to go with non standard perforated vinyl in black !! So, I think the air circulation won't be a problem.

 

As for the bulldog clips.  I would recommend using a clamp, every time when glueing anything with ANY glue.

 

I've used a product called 'FatMat extreme' for the sound deadening.  Easy to install.

 

Good luck with it all.

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