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Ever contemplated inboard rear discs?


Guest Anonymous

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Guest Anonymous

0308sr_chasis25_z.jpg

This is a completely screwy idea, I'm sure, but I can't stop thinking about inboard rear disc brakes; you know, like on a Jag-type IRS. Put a disc between each differential flange and the halfshaft, and the caliper bracket bolts to the subframe or differential.

Problems with this setup include poor cooling, roasting the differential side seals, and getting oil on your brakes. Advantages include freedom to choose brakes that don't fit quite right in the confines of the wheel, and lower unsprung mass on the rear wheels. Plus its just cool looking.

The picture is from the Heidt's IRS for street rods. I love this kind of tech.

So...anyone out there try this?

Mike

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Guest Anonymous

And I'm going for side exhaust outlet, in front of the tire, so I can contemplate such ridiculous ideas with some danger of actually trying it.

Mike

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Guest Anonymous

panviewsmall.jpg

URL: http://www.winnsecurity.com/norcal02

I like the idea, its definately different, but I dont know about the practicality.

Gave me an excuse to post this picture though ;)

Inboard rear disks on my dads racecar. Disadvantage..generally less cooling for one than outboard brakes. If you dont notice immediatley why I took this pic look at the cross member! :P

broken.jpg
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Guest Anonymous

panviewsmall.jpg

URL: http://www.winnsecurity.com/norcal02

That race was at sears point, and I live like 15 minutes away so it wasnt too terrible. He didnt even realize it broke when he was out in practice. It just got a little more 'loose'..WELL DAMN! YEA!

I wish it was a DSR! My dad is trying to sell them to get a newer car, but I am trying to push him to get a DSR instead. That is an old S2 made by TIGA.

Here's another pic from the outside, much less swoopy than the new ones :)

s21.jpg

Both of them in the garage. The one on the right hasnt been raced since it was rebuilt in like '91 or something.

s22.jpg

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Guest Anonymous

Neat idea as it saves on that unsprun weight factor... un neat idea as in re-engineering whole rear suspension to do it... if you've got a racer and wanted the extra edge... this might be it... or those new custom length driveshafts might snap like twigs... under the torsional loads placed on them... or how the outer hub assembly will deal with the increased loads.... but I say TRY IT!! cause hell I wanna see this

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Guest Anonymous

I might get around to mocking up a dummy over the next few weeks (ummm...months), but the car won't be moving anytime soon.

Are shaft failures common on the Jag rear ends? Did your FV use stock V-dub hubs and such? How about 6-cylinder shafts to deal with the increased loads?

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Guest Anonymous

Thinking about it, I certainly see that the torsional load on the halfshaft will increase substantially, but I don't see how the hub loading can change. Whether the brake is inboard or outboard, the hub bearing takes the fore-aft load of braking. The stub axle will suffer the same torsional load as the halfshaft, and they've been known to fail just from motor torque.

Mike

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Guest Anonymous

I was also afraid that the half shafts and especially the CV joints can't take it. I don't think cooling is such a problem if you used vented discs. Also it's easy to make some ducting there. Baking the diff seals could be a problem and extra heat is not good for the differential itself.

Tommy

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Guest Anonymous

The early Jags didn't get great pad life on the rears but with the new materials today you should by ok. If you are using a 320 diff you just might get the rotors in there instead of the spacers, you have the 2 diff mounting bolts right there on eather side to pick up for a caliper bracket, I think the biggest problem is heat and heat soaking but with synthetic oil and the right vents whoknows, someone needs to try this....Marty...

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