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Suspension 'tips' inquiry...


Guest Anonymous

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Guest Anonymous

Just took the plunge and ordered new sport Bilsteins, lower springs, ball joints, wheel bearings (front), upper strut bearings (non-adjustable), and rear upper shock mounts. Parts should be here in a couple of days, so I wanted to make sure I had everything in order before they arrive. Aside from a coil compressing tool, are there any other specialty tools needed in any of these tasks? (If I'm not mistaken the ball joints on the early years are bolt in and don't require 'pressing', check me if I'm wrong there.) I heard replacing rear wheel bearings was a bear, so I'm doing them at another time to cut down on down time. Also, any installation tips, tricks, time savers, etc. that I should know in advance so I don't find myself in an emergency situation halfway into it? TIA

Shad

'70 '02 (that's about to make me smile even wider...)

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Guest Anonymous

steveos_car_tiny.jpg

If the ball joints are still original, which i doubt, they are rivited to the controll arms. If they are you'll need to drill them out and get the bolts for the new ball joints.

The three bolts that hold the strut to the arm are supposed to have safty wire through them. You'll need to remove them to get to the nut that holds the ball joint. good luck removing that one :) it might be really stuck in there. Fire and heat are good tools to consider for this job.

You should get a ball joint removal tool. There are two types. One is a fork looking thing that you hit with BFH and it pops the ball joint out. The other is a bolt through the braket looking thing. Works well and preservs the ball joint. Not good for situations where there are a lot of other parts arount the joint.

i used the fork in places where i couldn't use the other thing. If you are in bay area i have an extra bolt through braket tool that that i can part with if you bring me a nice stout or porter.

Wheel bearings. Get the grease (obvious) and get the correct size cotter pins. Do not reuse your old ones. Unless you want to see your wheels go faster then your car.

You'll need to either have a machine shop pull out and then press in a new outer race for the bearings. Or you can "gently" tap it out and then tap the new one in.

Do not overfill the hub with grease. If you do it can give you an impression that the bearings are tight, but they won't be. Check the bearings after about 100 miles. may be less. All access grease would slip out into the dust cover by then and you might need to retighten them.

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Guest Anonymous

you'll need something like vice grips to stop the strut from turning while you loosen and tighten the nut. If your balljoints are original you'll need to drill out rivets that hold them on the control arms. WHat else will you need? Oh, ya... safety wire and cotter pins.

-E

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Guest Anonymous

2002 - hover mode.JPG

Things to consider.

New spring perch pads for the front and rear. The front is cheap, the rear is not. There are also three sizes for the rear. Be sure to do these, mine were toast on my '68 and nothing is worse than you new springs sitting metal on metal in the perch.

New tie-rods. You will probably want to get it aligned after you are done so why not do it right. Spend the money now while it's in the air. Again, mine were toast.

Get the car in the air as high and safe as possible. I did this by putting ramps next to each of the jack points on the car. I then took two 4x4 boards and ran them the width of the car so the car was on top of the wood and then on top of the ramps. I also had jack stands snugged up just in case.

Now is an easy time to put some fresh brake fluid in. Everything is out of the way and easy to access. Just a thought.

If you have the time/money due the sway bar bushings, subframe bushings, etc. It will really tighten up the feel of the car.

As I think of more I'll post.

Todd

'68 project

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Guest Anonymous

the top of the strut has no structural role, is never seen and serves only to keep the shock cartridge in the tube. Why do you need a 'special' (and difficult to keep on) tool to do a very simple job?

Besides, you're going to need that mofo wrench to get the old cap off the tower with 30 years of rust and corrosion holding it in place.

More complicated isn't better. KISS!!!

Cheers!

John N

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