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Departing Dilemma


Guest Anonymous

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Guest Anonymous

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So here's the problem- I'm currently living in Aloha OR (near portland), and am planning to move down to Los Angeles sometime this year. I have two 'cars' an '81 El Camino, and a '76 2002. The 02 has no EGR valve, but I think the rest of the emissions stuff is there. My dilemma is, should I keep the 02??

*OPTION 1: Sell the 02 and the camino and buy a new car in LA and put around like everyone else.

*OPTION 2:Sell neither, tow the 02 w/the camino and try to squeeze by emissions, killing my dreams of dual webs and bad idling.

*OPTION 3:Sell both, buy a pre-'74 02, and start over again. This would have to be denying the fact that I won't find one in as good a condition as my current one for the same $.

So, I ask you wise 02-ers, what do I do?

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Guest Anonymous

in California as the 30+ model year rule will apply. I think the El Camino will be easier to make smog-OK than the '02. You can bring the '02 in and make it non-op for this year so you don't need the check, and then in 1-year it will be smog-exempt and you can do what you like as it will already have Cal reg. Technically, if you become a resident you have to get a Cal DL and Cal auto reg. If you keep your OR DL and car reg you could drive the '02 also, but your insurance co. won't like your being in L.A. If you get a Cal DL and keep OR car reg you could get cited for avoiding the car fees. In California, transfer of title takes precedence over proof of insurance at the DMV, so when you get the Cal titles you will not be required to show proof of insurance as technically you can't insure cars you don't own (not your case but in the ballpark). I'm an insurance agent in L.A. and have to deal with situations like this all the time.

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Guest Anonymous

...if you like the El Camino, then keep it. They are appreciating in value and one in good condition is worth keeping around. Besides, you will want a car with cold, working AC.

Can you keep the '76 registered in Oregon somehow?

If the '76 is "close", then send it to a shop that will babysit it through the process and make a best effort at getting it to pass. If they can't arrange for the car to meet the smog requirements then sell it to someone out of state or hang on to it for awhile longer.

However, be forewarned that the law in California is such that a car still has to meet emission standards whether it is exempt or not -- any car from 1968 to 1974 which many people believe are "exempt" are only exempt from the mandatory inspections. This doesn't mean they are "free" from inspections -- you can get tagged by an intersection sniffer, a nuisance neighbor, or a peace officer and be asked to bring the car in for inspection.

You could always buy a 1974 model year VIN (parts car with decent registration status) and just use these plates on your car... but I wouldn't suggest this.

Brian

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Guest Anonymous

If you can swing shuttling back and forth once or twice, it's not unheard of to keep your Oregon registration on the 02 for a year. One year from now, in 2005, the '76 will become California smog-exempt, I believe. To keep it as legal as possible (it's a grey area in all states) you'll need a legit Oregon address.

Another option is that some states, including Montana, make it possible to register a car there even if you're not a resident. This is done by setting up an LLC (limited liability corporation) that you own, that in turn owns and registers the car. This requires hiring a 'registered agent' in Montana that forwards your paperwork, etc. It's all quite legal, and Montana promotes this for high-dollar motorhome registration by offering a tax break not found in other states.

On the other hand, if your '76 02 is nothing special to you, there are plenty of nice ones in LA.

Mike

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Guest Anonymous

i wish man, i wish. When I told my grandpa I had bought an american car he laughed.. when I called him a month later he said 'well, did you learn your lesson yet?' hehe and I was calling him to bitch about the 'car' ..El Camino, the only car that's left me stranded.

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Guest Anonymous

I've heard more than once that '76 02s are more solidly constructed than earlier cars. I think I'd hang on to the 02 by whatever means necessary until it can be registered. WTF do you want to go to L.A. for, anyhow? I've not beeen there for 4ish years, but my take on the place then was that it would be beautiful with like a couple million fewer people.

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Guest Anonymous

trust me, I can think of a few places I'd rather be than LA but most of my family's there and Intel is turning out to be something I don't like. Plus, I'll have a better paying job. ..and I think I'll take your advice and keep the car. I love it :)

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Guest Anonymous

I was afraid that CA was like oregon in that '74 would ALWAYS be the cut-off date for exemption. If the rule IS '30-years' than I'll definately wait it out. thanks for the advice!

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