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woo-hooo!! 45 dcoe!!


Guest Anonymous

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Guest Anonymous

just got my single 45 in place with the lynx manifold, still figuring out the tuning, but this is a great piece. I'm not sure what I think about the cable linkage yet, it seems extremely sensitive, and has a really light touch (pedal 1/2 way down is full throttle) and the return is a little slow. but overall went in pretty painlessly, only had to throw tools twice.

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Guest Anonymous

that the spring on the pedal box is still on (it is on the same pole

that the throttle lever is). This spring helps bring the pedal back

to 'off' position.

hth,

Dewar

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Guest Anonymous

its there but its age is unknown. I'm pretty sure Moses was the original owner, and you know how he was about vehicle maintainance.....

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Guest Anonymous

If the throttle is too light for your liking, you can put another

spring (home depot, parts store...) at the top of the throtle linkage

(by manifold -- it just need to help pull the throttle closed). This

should also help the peddle come back a little better. I had to do

this just to get my revs to come back down in a reasonable

fashion between shifts. Experiment with different springs to get

the right stiffness.

hth,

dewar

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Guest Anonymous

It is located at one end of the throtle shaft with a notched spacer. I am trying to order that specific part for my old but rebuilt 45s...

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Guest Anonymous

That goes in the rear of the carb right behind the acc. pump piston? the spring is held on top with a little brass disc with 2 slots to hold the top of the spring and the bottom goes to the throttle shaft, This is a real good thing to have on all DCOE's incase of linkage failure ect. to shut down the throttle, these are still avalible let me see if I can dig up some part numbers....Marty....

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Guest Anonymous

Per Top End drawings parts are #50 spring, part # 47605.012. and #51 spring anchor, part # 52210.006. These can be installed with the carbs on the car with a pair of needle nose pliers and some patience, again for those not running them I highly recomend them, unitended WOT with duel webers is impressive and very scarey....Marty.....

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Guest Anonymous

I guess you are talking about the spring hidden behind the accelerator pump cover. Nop. Some DCOEs have an extra return spring located at the end of the shaft, along with an anchor plate. Exactly like a 40 or 44 IDF.

Check the cover from Hayne's Weber manual.

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Guest Anonymous

Looks like its another way to do the same thing, I do thing its important to have some type of spring that works directly on the throttle shaft not thru the linkage to shut them off incase of failure, something most aftermarket weber aren't fitted with....Marty...

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Guest Anonymous

motor.jpg

That seems like a much better fix. I just rebuilt my 45s, but didn't

take the throttle shaft and all that business out. Do you think you

will have to reset the throttle position when you install the spring

(i.e. take the carbs back off the car)? Not sure how that business

works. My car has always idled high without a spring of some sort

pulling the throttle linkage back. Had to go with a lesser tension

spring on the last install to keep from putting a huge strain on the

accelerator arm (for some reason... all parts were the same), and

the idle is back up a bit, although it does come down correctly

after revs.

Dewar

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