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Removing hood


Guest Anonymous

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Guest Anonymous

Will it work if I just disconnect the hinges from the car, leave them connected to the hood, and lift them out through the triangular holes? It is hard to tell if they'll fit.

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Guest Anonymous

I took my hood off (one of the dumbest things I have done to date BTW.). I didnt mark the position of the hinges (to either the body or the hood itself) and when I went back to replace the hood on the car, lol.

Its still not competely right...

Anyways, what I am saying is to:

I'd leave the hinges attached to the body, and mark where the hinges bolt to the hood.

More or less.. take your time, and make sure to mark the hinges.

HTH,

Lyle

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Guest Anonymous

front_corner.JPG

I've never heard of anyone doing it that way, but it might be doable. Try it and let us know! It could be a brilliant idea, or we might learn from your mistake. 8-)

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Guest Anonymous

It looks like they will fit, and will be a little easier to reconnect (hood will be closed, and will only need someone to keep it at the right height). Added bonus, punches in metal to mark position will be much less noticeable behind the grill than the engine bay.

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Guest Anonymous

Takes one less variable out of hood adjustment after its time to put the hood back on.

Took forever to rebuild my motor so, six months later I was struggling to put the hood back on. Here is what I did..

The hood is awkward for one person to lift off and set down somewhere - I put a couple of larger finish nails into a wall to support it and, keep it safely out of the way. I hung it through the slotted vents at the back, makes a cool wall sculpture for over the fireplace too, or dinning room. The spouse will really appreciate it. Really.

Before all the ruckus started, I did give some thought to the replacement opperation. I actually drilled a couple 1/4in holes thru the vertical portion of the hinge and into the body support from the front of the car (with the grilles removed, of course). When it was time to put the hood back on the car I pegged the hinge with a slightly tapered 1/4in dia. aluminum pins then located and tightened the fasteners.Voila! No adjustment was necessary. Beer then, flowed...

So, it is possible...

Good luck,

John McA

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Guest Anonymous

When I remove my hood soon, if I can find the time, I was going to leave the hinges to the car, but prior to removing I was going to take a removable marker and outline the hinges on the hood. This would allow me to put the hinges back in the exact spot they were in prior to removal.

Kind of the chalk outline theory.....

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Guest Anonymous

Keeps you fromdoing anything too wrong, too quickly.

Beer drunk at this stage is also known as 'solution fluid'.

Then, after you thought out how to do it and, do it correctly, the beer

suddenly changes to 'inspection fluid'.

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Guest Anonymous

He often worked alone,and managed hoods of all kinds single handedly.

While the hoods, doors and trunk lids were still on the car, he drilled little 1/8" holes in all of the hinge plates so that he could could put a little wire nail into them during reassembly to keep everything square. Worked every time!

He got mad at me once for reinstalling a hood on a Volvo 122 by myself. I think he was angry 'cuz I followed his methods "a little too well."

Delia

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Guest Anonymous

I'm not near my car at the moment but if I recall from when I rebuilt my car the hinges also have an up/down adjustment where you want to remove them still leaving the problem of aligning it properly.

The hood on these cars is a pain in the butt in my opinion, especially if you do it yourself (I know, I have no friends!) because then when you go to put it back on you run the risk of scratching the paint on the fenders, etc.

use a buddy

mark all your hinge bolt spots

use lots of rags

have patience!

you'll be fine.

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Guest Anonymous

and there's a good reason for doing it that way. The bottom of the three holes in the hinge is slotted for that reason. You put the hood in the open position and remove the to 2 bolts, loosen the bottom bolt on each side but dont' remove it. That will keep the hood in place so you can grab the sides of it and lift it straight up and out. I removed and installed (leave the bottom bolt in loosely when you reinstall) the hood on my car by myself this way, and I'm not a big guy. Left the hinges bolted to the hood for sanding painting etc..., and had no trouble lining things up when done.

HTH,

Matt

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