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Anyone here try this Korman part?


Guest Anonymous

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Guest Anonymous

Lower Decamber Plates for BMW 1600/ 2002

For lowered cars only. Corrects geometry of lower control arm, improves negative camber angles under hard cornering. Machined from hardened T-6 aluminum.

P/N 31082002

What did/do you think of it?

Lyle

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Guest Anonymous

I made my own for the IT race car. They work well if you need them. Only for severely lowered vehicles. They correct the angle of the control arms so they will not be angled the wrong way as they work. Not really required for a street car.

Good Luck,

Mike (#87)

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Guest Anonymous

I was wondering because, my car is lowered w/ bil. sports, and eibachs. The front tires have a pretty bad + camber problem, causing the tires to wear on the outside....

I was wondering if these parts will fix my problem?

TIA,

Lyle

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Guest Anonymous

No, their purpose is to help correct bump steer + roll center on lowered cars.

When a car is lowered, the geometry of the control arms suffers changes that don't improve handling. You can either raise the inner pick-up point (inner arm bush) or lower the outer end (ball joint). These would help restore the angle of the arm. Bump steer, roll center, and the camber change are all impacted by the angle of the front control arm.

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Guest Anonymous

a toe out problem. Camber does not wear your tires unless it is excessive. Toe out will wear the outside edges of your tires and toe in will wear the inside. Camber will make the wear worse, but will not cause it.

I would take your car and have it aligned or at least checked. Then make your decision of what to do.

If you have Bilsteins and Eibachs the car is not low enough to require the spacers. All they do is correct the angle of the control arms so stearing is better. They do not change anything else.

Good Luck,

Mike (#87)

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Guest Anonymous

At first, I did not catch that you said +camber was the problem.

If your car is lowered enough to where the control arms are parallel to the ground, then when the suspension compresses the arm swings up & pulls the loaded wheel into more positive camber.

The spacers will help prevent that by restoring the downward angle of the control arm. That way, when the suspension compresses, the arm will push the strut out to go more negative on the loaded wheel (better than the reverse).

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Guest Anonymous

OK, after reading all the comments I finally figured out what part is being discussed. I'm working on the suspension on a Korman-prepared car and noticed that the ball joint is located much differently than a stock 2002. The modification is obviously to prevent "bump steer" that can result from messing up the orientation of the lower control arm and give it the same range of motion that it would have if the car wasn't lowered. Pretty neat way to adjust the lower control arm on a lowered car.

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