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Camshaft identification question, Michelin XAS/Coker tire qu


Guest Anonymous

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Guest Anonymous

Hello,

I have in my possession a camshaft which isn't at all usable for the street (pie in the sky 317 degrees duration)that I'd like to eBay. I would not want to misrepresent the item and feel obliged to take the cam to a shop to have it measured. Is such a task within the realm of reason to have done for little expense. Second question! A time passes the otherwise desirable Yokohama AVS 205-60/13's (irreplaceable too!) on my '02 will wear out. I've thought of either period Dunlop SP's or OEM Michelin XAS in a nearly stock size as a replacement. I too like the 'light on its feet' feel of tiny rubber. While I could e-mail Coker Tire, I was wondering if anyone here had gone this route and how things had worked out. Thanks.

Mike K.

bmwmalaga@hotmail.com

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Guest Anonymous

you just need a degree wheel and a mic on a stand.. lift can be measured with a set of calipers... most hot rod shops could do this in an hour

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Guest Anonymous

Don't think you'd be happy with the XASs unless your car is an occasional use fair weather car that you want to keep authentic. XASs were state of the art in 1968 and are still good in the snow, but I'd go with perhaps a 185/70x13 tire for everyday use. Easier steering than a 205, will fit a 5 inch rim just fine. I loved my XAS tires back in the early 70s, but even cheap T rated modern tires are better handling.

Just my opinion...

Mike

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Guest Anonymous

The XASes were, at last check, on serious backorder from Michelin (through Coker, the only source I was aware of in the states) awaiting new production in France. I ended up with the last three of them (they're now on a car) on Coker's shelves about nine months ago.

The XAS is a fine tire, if you backdate your reference points thirty years or so. They're a decent early radial, have excellent steering feel (not just because of their skinny size), and are great in the dirt if you run them inside out (teeth on the outside). Incredibly controllable and slidable, and a set usually lasts longer than an ice age or two - the old joke used to be that the compound's so hard, they don't really wear out - they just compress.

However, be warned. Cornering speeds will drop about 5-10 mph compared to any modern tire, and they're truly horrible in the rain. If you've never driven a period tire, or any of the 50s/60s "performance" crossplies (which the XAS behaves a lot like, IMHO), then you'll be surprised, and possibly disappointed. It's truly a period item, and makes you realize just what a large part modern tires play in keeping the '02 from feeling dated...

That said, they went on my mom's 29,000 original-mile '73 tii, and are a perfect match to the character of the car. It slides around controllably all day long, is a hoot and a half (compared to the 205/60s it wore when she bought it), and gets wheelspin in the first two gears...in the dry...

Sam

'88 m3

'68 02, ITB

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