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Found 33 results

  1. How to Reuse Heater Motor Metal Fan Blades The replacement heater blower motor is no longer available as a complete assembly; only the blower motor itself. Many of us would like to keep the original metal or aluminum fan blade, but it’s almost impossible to remove the fan blade from the old/seized motor without destroying the pressed in the plastic bushing that the fan sits between. By this decade, any of these bushings have also become brittle and separated. If you have a very early metal blade that came with the set screw, then you may be able to transfer and reuse the blade if the set screw is not rusted out. PRDesignSF has been proud to offer you the plastic fan blade that adapts to the new motor. Since there is a lot less weight for the motor to turn, it puts less stress on the motor, allowing it to last longer while providing almost the same airflow. For those who would like to save and reuse the metal/aluminum blades, we have created an adapter screw from stainless steel that will work. Now you will be able to reuse the metal blade and make it look more original. Here's a quick guide to removing the blade safely without destroying it. The one thing that you do not want to do is attempt to yank the blade off the shaft; you will damage the blade. The metal shaft needs to be cut off and press out. You could reuse the plastic bushing if they are still in good condition, or if you do not want to take a chance for the bushing to become separated in the future, you can use the new adapter screw that we made. With the motor out, separate the plastic body housing by prying the tabs and they will split up. Remove the press-in clip at the end of the shaft and cut the upper support arm bearing housing. This is to create some space for you to be able to cut the shaft. Now you can pull the internal parts out, including the stator, from the housing. There is a square clip at the back of the bearing support arms; pry it with a screwdriver and the support arm will become loose, but still attached to the shaft. It’s seated in a spherical race. You should be able to move it around to create enough space to cut the shaft now. With the shaft cut off, turn the fan upside down and support it with a 14mm deep socket. Now, you can use a punch to drift the shaft out. The bushing will be separated and the fan will be free. The plastic bushing consists of two separate parts, the top half features a built-in key to lock the blade, and the bottom half to keep the upper bushing from coming off the blade by pressing into it. You can clean up the blade, but be very gentle with an aluminum blade: It’s very easy to deform the blade. The adapter screw is very easy to install. Twist the adapter through the fan center hole and tighten it with the nylock nut. Use an 8mm Allen and 14mm socket to tighten the adapter screw. Tightened to 16-18 Ft-Lb. Mark approximately 5 mm from the upper fan body to the shaft; too far out and the fan will interfere with the fresh air flap. You can also tell if you’ve put the fan at the right depth if you have the chamfered edge slightly sticking out from the adapter. Tighten the set screw using a 2mm Allen into the shaft. Because the set screw is cupped, it will bite into the shaft and secure it. Be sure to use thread locker (medium strength) on the set screw to prevent it from backing out. You could also apply a dab of paint on the top of the set screw to provide additional protection from backing out. Optionally (Recommended), you can also cut a divot into the shaft to provide a flat area for the set screw to sit in; it’s still a good idea to apply thread locker onto the set screw. To test proper blade orientation, power up the motor (Male -, Female +). When the blades are facing you, they should be turning counter-clockwise. If you feel a lot of vibration (Light vibration is acceptable), then most likely the blades were not straight. Looking from the side of the motor, check if all the blade’s center ridges are 90 degrees (perpendicular) to the shaft motor, otherwise, they are out of balance. With this, now you have the option of reusing your metal/aluminum blade or plastic blade. Either metal (Used) or plastic fan blades can be purchased from our store as well. Contact us at www.PRDesignsf.com or email [email protected] Happy ’02 motoring!
  2. So I know that the heater valve/fresh air Bowden cable is still available but I couldn't find the two flap cables. So initially I restored my heater box with old cables because they were working. But the thought of those cables getting rusted and stuck again, was daunting. I've decided to do a research on alternative options. The oem metal wire has 1.4mm diameter and it's not so strong. The wire cover itself is made of metal spring and vinyl skin but over time, rusty metal cause friction and eventually wire or lever get stuck. I decided to search for a stainless steel wire in bigger diameter that would strengthen the lever force and basically won't rust. So I went to local hardware store and bought stainless steel wire in 1.6mm diameter. To replace the old wire cover, I chose Shmano brake line sleeve. It's made for mountain bike application with extreme brake use conditions and is much more resistant and durable than the oem cable. It's available in most colors (of course I went with inka!) for around $6 meter. The brake sleeve has 5mm external and 2mm internal diameters. Be aware of fake copies out there! After using the stainless steel wire with Shimano sleeve, I notice a complete improvement with almost no friction. Here is a comparison: The hardest part of copying the oem wire was the swirled attachment tip to the lever shaft. Stainless steel wire was really hard to bend and it came coiled under tension which made it harder to bend in opposite direction but I finally figured it out. Using a screwdriver with same diameter as the lever shaft, hold the wire with a plier over the screwdriver and use your thumb to bend it around the screwdriver. Then cut the excess with wire cutter. Once you master these, the rest is self explanatory. The lever movement has improved to better than the oem part and will last longer. I can move levers with my finger nails. I hope this help so many of members out there looking for better, more reliable and cheaper alternative. Cheers.
  3. I have gone through a few heater valves. guts break, replace whole valve with another used valve, repeat. enough. this time i bought a rebuild kit from BLUNTTECH. why buy a new valve when the brass part does not wear out, the kit includes EVERYTHING but the brass shell. rebuild is a VERY simple process. so what do you need for this job? old valve rebuild kit flat blade screwdriver phillips head screw driver 7mm wrench small pick brass cleaner dremel with wire wheel NOTE - this is just the rebuild of the later "big" heater valves and does not include the removal or install of a valve. the kit and the broken valve remove two screw with flat blade, take cover off. now use 7mm wrench to unbolt control arm from back remove broken guts old and new guts. new looks much stronger. very important part here. main reason these valve fail (at least from all the ones i have taken apart) is that the inside of the valve corrodes in one spot becoming rough. particulary true if the valve sits in one open or closed position for a long time. the plastic guts then hang up on the corroded area of the shell and break. clean the inside of the brass shell until nice smooth and shiny. i used some 600grit and a dremel wire wheel to do this, then polished with metal polish like ibis or brasso. now assemble the guts don't forget the o-ring on shaft i used a little teflon grease on all the parts. assemble now grab the cover. remove old o-ring with pick same cleaning and polish rule applies to cover install new o-ring okay now put cover on the valve. note the position and alignment of the guts and the arrow on the cover. use the new screws and lock rings to assemble (new parts are phillips heads) put the control arm back on with 7mm wrench. don't forget the little washer. note position of arm and open/closed valve. we are looking at the HEATER end of the valve in these picks. DONE! bagged up and ready for install at a later date.
  4. My rebuilt IE heater valve failed the other day. The control wire no longer rotates the internal plastic valve when the lever is activated. I must have forced the lever too much, damaging the plastic piece. I pulled the rebuilt valve and temporarily replaced it with a household water gate valve. The PO must have lost the proper drilled shank bolt to attach the control wire and instead crimped a loop fastener at the end of the wire which is also failing and needs to go away. I want to locate the proper fastener as seen in this nice photo lifted from a posting from jgerock on the forum. The proper fastener would allow me to adjust the amount of travel and hopefully save the plastic internal valve. I plan on trying another valve rebuild kit but don't want to ruin second one. Does anyone know a source for this fastener?? They look similar to ones I may have seen on air cooled VW's but would appreciate any leads. Thanks. You can see how the shoulder of the indented oval area has been worn away resulting in the failure.
  5. Heater goes cold with no warning. Engine temp also rises at same time. Sliding switch back and forth sometimes restores heat, sometimes vent still puts out cold air. Feels like the cable is connected to the valve.
  6. $50 + shipping Retails for $133.27 (see pic)
  7. I have some 2002 parts I am starting to clear out. Let me know what you are interested in and I will let you know actual cost to ship. Contact me at [email protected] or text 858-208-8449 Weber 32/36 DGAV - This came off a well running TI motor - $80 Solex 36-40 PDSI - I have two of these - $50 EA Fuel pump original old version for 1502, 1602, 1802, 2002 from 08/73 up only with pump rod 88 mm length (part number 13 31 1 255 727) - $30 EA Fuel pump 1502,1602,1802,2002 only with pump rod 108 mm length (part number 13 31 1 250 398) -$35 Chrome 13" hubcaps for Early 2002 - $80 for all 5 AC Fan Housing - 1972 BMW 2002, not tested; you will get what you see in pictures. $100 Heater Box -$85 tii brake calipers ATE right and left - SOLD
  8. How to Reuse Heater Motor Metal Fan Blades The replacement heater blower motor is no longer available as a complete assembly; only the blower motor itself. Many of us would like to keep the original metal or aluminum fan blade, but it’s almost impossible to remove the fan blade from the old/seized motor without destroying the pressed in the plastic bushing that the fan sits between. By this decade, any of these bushings have also become brittle and separated. If you have a very early metal blade that came with the set screw, then you may be able to transfer and reuse the blade if the set screw is not rusted out. PRDesignSF has been proud to offer you the plastic fan blade that adapts to the new motor. Since there is a lot less weight for the motor to turn, it puts less stress on the motor, allowing it to last longer while providing almost the same airflow. For those who would like to save and reuse the metal/aluminum blades, we have created an adapter screw from stainless steel that will work. Now you will be able to reuse the metal blade and make it look more original. Here's a quick guide to removing the blade safely without destroying it. The one thing that you do not want to do is attempt to yank the blade off the shaft; you will damage the blade. The metal shaft needs to be cut off and press out. You could reuse the plastic bushing if they are still in good condition, or if you do not want to take a chance for the bushing to become separated in the future, you can use the new adapter screw that we made. With the motor out, separate the plastic body housing by prying the tabs and they will split up. Remove the press-in clip at the end of the shaft and cut the upper support arm bearing housing. This is to create some space for you to be able to cut the shaft. Now you can pull the internal parts out, including the stator, from the housing. There is a square clip at the back of the bearing support arms; pry it with a screwdriver and the support arm will become loose, but still attached to the shaft. It’s seated in a spherical race. You should be able to move it around to create enough space to cut the shaft now. With the shaft cut off, turn the fan upside down and support it with a 14mm deep socket. Now, you can use a punch to drift the shaft out. The bushing will be separated and the fan will be free. The plastic bushing consists of two separate parts, the top half features a built-in key to lock the blade, and the bottom half to keep the upper bushing from coming off the blade by pressing into it. You can clean up the blade, but be very gentle with an aluminum blade: It’s very easy to deform the blade. The adapter screw is very easy to install. Twist the adapter through the fan center hole and tighten it with the nylock nut. Use an 8mm Allen and 14mm socket to tighten the adapter screw. Tightened to 16-18 Ft-Lb. Mark approximately 5 mm from the upper fan body to the shaft; too far out and the fan will interfere with the fresh air flap. You can also tell if you’ve put the fan at the right depth if you have the chamfered edge slightly sticking out from the adapter. Tighten the set screw using a 2mm Allen into the shaft. Because the set screw is cupped, it will bite into the shaft and secure it. Be sure to use thread locker (medium strength) on the set screw to prevent it from backing out. You could also apply a dab of paint on the top of the set screw to provide additional protection from backing out. Optionally (Recommended), you can also cut a divot into the shaft to provide a flat area for the set screw to sit in; it’s still a good idea to apply thread locker onto the set screw. To test proper blade orientation, power up the motor (Male -, Female +). When the blades are facing you, they should be turning counter-clockwise. If you feel a lot of vibration (Light vibration is acceptable), then most likely the blades were not straight. Looking from the side of the motor, check if all the blade’s center ridges are 90 degrees (perpendicular) to the shaft motor, otherwise, they are out of balance. With this, now you have the option of reusing your metal/aluminum blade or plastic blade. Either metal (Used) or plastic fan blades can be purchased from our store as well. Contact us at www.PRDesignsf.com or email [email protected] Happy ’02 motoring! View full article
  9. I just received my heater blower motor and the fan blade is quite loose. The free play is between the plastic hub and the metal fan. Is this normal? It arrived well packaged and appears to be undamaged but want to be sure. Thanks.
  10. Hi: I'm in need of a good core of a heater valve that I can rebuild. Only need the brass body and cover but they need to be in good shape. Please send PM Located in Bay Area. Thanks, Rich
  11. Price:: 325.00 Location: : richmond,ca i am selling a behr heater box it's complete and i am also including the heater control faces with knobs, the fan turns, the heater core is intact no leaks, holes or cracks, it can be used but i would recommend a good cleaning. Its getting colder out there and i do believe this is an important item to enjoy your classic ride in a warm enviroment. The blower was tested and it works without a problem!
  12. CAR: 1974 tii PROJECT: overhauling heater box and heater radiator STATUS: overhaul finished (quite a job! many hours!) and radiator rejuvenated and springtime fresh PROBLEM: The heater switch now has only two speeds: Medium, Medium, and High (rather than Low, Medium, and High). COMMENTS: I don't recall breaking anything, all wiring appears to be OK, and the Yellow, Brown, Black, and Purple wires are in the correct places behind the resistor board...I think. QUESTIONS: Where did Low speed go? How can I get it back? Any of you who have overhauled a 2002 heater box will understand this comment: I need to make SURE the speed switch functioning correctly BEFORE I put the heater box back in place. Thank you for any help you can provide. 2002#2 Larry
  13. Does anyone know whether the Bowden cable that controls the heater valve is still available new? If so, what is the part number and where can I get one? 1973 2002tii.
  14. Often overlooked on any restoration of a heater box. This article details a great upgrade. So I know that the heater valve/fresh air Bowden cable is still available but I couldn't find the two flap cables. So initially I restored my heater box with old cables because they were working. But the thought of those cables getting rusted and stuck again, was daunting. I've decided to do a research on alternative options. The oem metal wire has 1.4mm diameter and it's not so strong. The wire cover itself is made of metal spring and vinyl skin but over time, rusty metal cause friction and eventually wire or lever get stuck. I decided to search for a stainless steel wire in bigger diameter that would strengthen the lever force and basically won't rust. So I went to local hardware store and bought stainless steel wire in 1.6mm diameter. To replace the old wire cover, I chose Shmano brake line sleeve. It's made for mountain bike application with extreme brake use conditions and is much more resistant and durable than the oem cable. It's available in most colors (of course I went with inka!) for around $6 meter. The brake sleeve has 5mm external and 2mm internal diameters. Be aware of fake copies out there! After using the stainless steel wire with Shimano sleeve, I notice a complete improvement with almost no friction. Here is a comparison: The hardest part of copying the oem wire was the swirled attachment tip to the lever shaft. Stainless steel wire was really hard to bend and it came coiled under tension which made it harder to bend in opposite direction but I finally figured it out. Using a screwdriver with same diameter as the lever shaft, hold the wire with a plier over the screwdriver and use your thumb to bend it around the screwdriver. Then cut the excess with wire cutter. Once you master these, the rest is self explanatory. The lever movement has improved to better than the oem part and will last longer. I can move levers with my finger nails. I hope this help so many of members out there looking for better, more reliable and cheaper alternative. Cheers. View full article
  15. I'm in the process of rebuilding my heater box, and I'm missing the little deflector vents. See photo (credit to member 02Les from another recent thread): Are these pieces still available? I can't find them on any parts diagrams. Obviously not the end of the world if I can't find them, but getting the heater box back to stock is my goal. Thanks, Garrett
  16. Hi all, Anyone know where I can source this bit? It's the bolt and nut that clamps onto the cable that opens and closes the coolant valve into the heater core. No matter how I tried to bust the rust free first, this little bugger was frozen and finally snapped. Your guidance is greatly appreciated!!
  17. Hi Everyone, I am looking for a few parts for my 1967 2000 tilux; the heater box and air inlet channel, a restorable dash top pad, the long passenger side under dash panel, the small curved chrome piece beside the radio, both sides of the front door wood trim, old style round washer bottle and bracket, and any parts of the dual Solex PHH40 carbs and air filter casing setup. Feel free to email me at alexpaterdieATsympatico.ca Thanks.
  18. Price:: 30 Location: : WA For sale are more items from a running driving 1973 BMW 2002. Original pair of front calipers (for rebuild only): one side is perfect, one caliper missing pads, pins and has a chip on one piston: $35/shipped within the US Heater defrost tubes: no rips or tears and in actually very good condition: $20/shipped Standard BMW 2002 Jack: could use a coat of paint but is smooth and works like it should: $Sold Choke/throttle cable: $Sold Thanks, MF
  19. I am reluctantly forced to spend this Colorado winter driving my 1974 2002 due to clutch failure in my usual winter wheels, a 1991 Saab 900. I have had other 2002's through the winter months as a daily driver but its been years. Im wondering what everyone does to winterize their 2002 and make it more DRIVeABLE in the snow. -Should I throw an elephant in the trunk to compensate for the weight/traction issue? -Planning on buying some Blizzaks, any better suggestions for rubber? -My heater blows very weak and defrost is dead. Where do I begin to fix these heater issues? -The windshield wipers leave patches of wetness resembling swiss cheese, mostly cheese... How can I get them to make firm contact with the glass? -All around the side windows there is gushes of wind and thats gonna bite come freeze time. What, when, where, how to replace the strips/seals? -Any cold start tips? _Im considering pulling the door panels and stuffing insulation all in there for added heat retention! Seriously! Please, if anyone has experience with seriously winterizing there 2002 please help. Any and all tips, suggestions or anecdotes would be greatly appreciated! I hear its gonna be a DoOzY! ( I think i'll name my 2002 that, DooZy. Has a nice ring to it... yeah, Sahara Doozy. It's official. )
  20. Guest

    Heater Control Valve

    Price:: 92.00 Location: : richmond, ca Came out of a 1976 bmw, the control arm moves. this price is with free shipping. .
  21. I looked through the archives and didn't find the info I wanted. Can anyone help? 1972 2002 tii or any early model. I'm trying to save a couple of bucks and rebuild the heater valve. It is a beautiful brass valve. The two o-rings are worn out. gone. I think they were square o-rings. Here's my options. Buy at new one - $250 Buy a heater valve from another car for $25 or so Replace the o-rings in my existing heater valve One solution I thought was really cool was someone had installed a faucet/tap where the heater valve is. I don't want to stop the car, open the hood and adjust the heat. Ultra cool idea though. Especially for racing. If I use a heater valve from another car, what car do I order for. In the archives, I saw a lot of people saying they'd use a GM or Ford heater valve. What car would I order for? If I replace the o-rings in the heater valve I have, What do I order? I don't know the specs for the o-ring/gaskets. Thanks in advance.
  22. i'm a little confused about the coolant circulation in my engine bay. this is my current set up the heater hose looks to be a new one. it was a huge length and i'm not sure where it was supposed to go, but it's connected to the rear-most connection on the intake manifold and it didn't have cooling issues like that. (i bought an unfinished project and it's my first 02) what has me stumped is the size of the inlet/outlet(?) on the intake manifold that the heater hose labeled is connected to... it's a bigger size than the heater hose so i macguyvered a solution that works but looks like shit. there's an extra foot of heater hose i'd like to get rid of but it's an awkward transition and spot.
  23. Hi all, Pulled my heater box out last Friday, and upon taking it apart, noticed the insulation on the wires from the resistor to the fan motor was somewhat bumpy and where they contacted the lid of the heater box (the part the fan's mounted in) had been hot enough to go from smooth to bumpy as well. I bench tested the fan last night and it seems to work just fine, although it maybe spins a little less freely than it should - as it spins to a stop, it kind of stops hard (instead of smoothly as you'd expect). I've read the instructions on rebuilding the heater box, and I know it says to lubricate the bushings at either end of the fan motor, but is there anything else I should be suspecting here? I don't want to put this all back and then have to pull it out again.... Thanks! Chris
  24. My recently restored 02 (1972) has a heater that won't shut off. Lever, controls, fan all seem to be working, but I am always getting heat when I don't want it. I should mention that I installed FridgeKing A.C. and everything is a tight fit above the trans. tunnel; could this be interfering with a positive shut off of the heat?


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