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Found 9 results

  1. How to Reuse Heater Motor Metal Fan Blades The replacement heater blower motor is no longer available as a complete assembly; only the blower motor itself. Many of us would like to keep the original metal or aluminum fan blade, but it’s almost impossible to remove the fan blade from the old/seized motor without destroying the pressed in the plastic bushing that the fan sits between. By this decade, any of these bushings have also become brittle and separated. If you have a very early metal blade that came with the set screw, then you may be able to transfer and reuse the blade if the set screw is not rusted out. PRDesignSF has been proud to offer you the plastic fan blade that adapts to the new motor. Since there is a lot less weight for the motor to turn, it puts less stress on the motor, allowing it to last longer while providing almost the same airflow. For those who would like to save and reuse the metal/aluminum blades, we have created an adapter screw from stainless steel that will work. Now you will be able to reuse the metal blade and make it look more original. Here's a quick guide to removing the blade safely without destroying it. The one thing that you do not want to do is attempt to yank the blade off the shaft; you will damage the blade. The metal shaft needs to be cut off and press out. You could reuse the plastic bushing if they are still in good condition, or if you do not want to take a chance for the bushing to become separated in the future, you can use the new adapter screw that we made. With the motor out, separate the plastic body housing by prying the tabs and they will split up. Remove the press-in clip at the end of the shaft and cut the upper support arm bearing housing. This is to create some space for you to be able to cut the shaft. Now you can pull the internal parts out, including the stator, from the housing. There is a square clip at the back of the bearing support arms; pry it with a screwdriver and the support arm will become loose, but still attached to the shaft. It’s seated in a spherical race. You should be able to move it around to create enough space to cut the shaft now. With the shaft cut off, turn the fan upside down and support it with a 14mm deep socket. Now, you can use a punch to drift the shaft out. The bushing will be separated and the fan will be free. The plastic bushing consists of two separate parts, the top half features a built-in key to lock the blade, and the bottom half to keep the upper bushing from coming off the blade by pressing into it. You can clean up the blade, but be very gentle with an aluminum blade: It’s very easy to deform the blade. The adapter screw is very easy to install. Twist the adapter through the fan center hole and tighten it with the nylock nut. Use an 8mm Allen and 14mm socket to tighten the adapter screw. Tightened to 16-18 Ft-Lb. Mark approximately 5 mm from the upper fan body to the shaft; too far out and the fan will interfere with the fresh air flap. You can also tell if you’ve put the fan at the right depth if you have the chamfered edge slightly sticking out from the adapter. Tighten the set screw using a 2mm Allen into the shaft. Because the set screw is cupped, it will bite into the shaft and secure it. Be sure to use thread locker (medium strength) on the set screw to prevent it from backing out. You could also apply a dab of paint on the top of the set screw to provide additional protection from backing out. Optionally (Recommended), you can also cut a divot into the shaft to provide a flat area for the set screw to sit in; it’s still a good idea to apply thread locker onto the set screw. To test proper blade orientation, power up the motor (Male -, Female +). When the blades are facing you, they should be turning counter-clockwise. If you feel a lot of vibration (Light vibration is acceptable), then most likely the blades were not straight. Looking from the side of the motor, check if all the blade’s center ridges are 90 degrees (perpendicular) to the shaft motor, otherwise, they are out of balance. With this, now you have the option of reusing your metal/aluminum blade or plastic blade. Either metal (Used) or plastic fan blades can be purchased from our store as well. Contact us at www.PRDesignsf.com or email support@prdesignsf.com. Happy ’02 motoring!
  2. A few months ago, I wrote an article about repairing the heater valve bracket. You can see that article by clicking the link here. I really thank all of you for reading and all the responses received from the 2002 community. I had a tremendous request on the parts that I designed. Therefore, I decided to make some improvements to the bracket as well as additional parts that make rebuilding the heater box easier. I have gathered and made some special components/parts for those who want to rebuild the box themselves, starting with a new design heater valve bracket. I was fortunate enough to find a heater box top with an intact bracket. I was able to follow the shape of the original bracket, and because of that, the new design will be almost identical to the original bracket. The kit will also available with the other following items: • Heater valve lever with pinch bolt • Rubber grommets and delrin bushings (custom made) • Pre-cut foam kit for the flaps, heater core and perimeter box seals • Heater motor with a new fan blade Those who are interested in the parts can contact me at infous@autodynamiksf.com. This is the picture for the foam & grommet kit. On the left are foam strips for the perimeter box seal (furthest left), and then the heater core seal. In the upper middle area is the foam for the defroster and heater air flaps. Underneath that are two big rings for the heater core outlet. Below that are the flap grommets (the 7 small circular ones). Beneath that is the four relay shaft delrin bushings for the defroster and heater flaps. Beneath that is four spring clips that also go onto the flap shafts. To the right of that is the foam for the fresh air flap. To the furthest right is the foam for the outer box. Version 2 of my heater bracket reinforcement! I’ve updated it so that it looks very similar to the original bracket that was created from the factory. This time, the bracket is made in aluminum, making it lighter than the previous version. If your heater fan motor is seized or making noise, you don’t need to worry. I will show you how to get a replacement parts or you can get it from me. The heater fan motor is still available from Bosch, part # 0 130 007 002. The fan motor comes with a 6 mm shaft, or just slightly under ¼ “. If you buy a ready made fan blade with a ¼“ bore, it will be loose. The only option is to buy a plastic fan blade from Grainger, part # 5JLL6. It should be 5-9/16” Dia, CCW, with a 3/16” bore. This is the closest fan blade to the original aluminum fan blade, except that it is made of plastic and is lighter. Enlarge the bore with a 15/64” drill bit, but make sure that you drill it straight and on center, otherwise it will end up having a wobble (slight wobble is acceptable). I made a special jig to perform this job, since I do quite a bit of these repairs. Once the fan blade is done, press fit it onto the shaft with the clip facing away from the motor, and if you want, you can drop a little glue to make it more secure. You don’t need to balance it, since the blade is so light. It should provide you with plenty of CFM - I think it blows slightly stronger than the original motor. See the pictures below. These images show how I align the fan so that I can drill the fan perfectly centered. The grommets for the heater core outlets are very difficult to acquire. Even though the part is still being made by BMW, they are not available unless someone has old stock (NOS). Most of these grommets are dry, brittle, and torn after 30+ years. You can use sealer or putty to keep it together and seal the box from leaking out air, but it won’t look pretty. I found a replacement heater core outlet grommets (¾”x1/4”x1-⅝”) that were very similar/ acceptable to the original ones, and with slight modification, it would look like almost an oem part (see pictures). The rest of the parts are straightforward, except for the fan blade which was a little bit tricky to do. If you look at the pictures below. I put together a kit for what is necessary to rebuilt the heater box. This is the same kit I use to rebuild heater boxes. These are the grommets for the heater core outlets. The white area is where it is going to be trimmed - Without trimming this, the grommet won’t fit. It would need to be cut ⅜“ from the inside diameter. What you should get is this You should fit it onto the box with the flat side facing to the outside of the box, as shown. But from here, there is still some further modifications that need to be done. Unless you cut out a groove for the pipes, you will have a hard time putting the top cover onto the assembly. This is why I modified the grommets, grind the inside diameter following the outlet heater core pipes by using a die grinder or round file. It should be approximately ground at 30º - 45º. Both the top and bottom of the grommet will need to be cut, but on the opposite sides! This will help the top cover fit easier. After you grind out the groove, it should look like this: On the left side is the outer side of the box; the right image shows what it looks like on the inside. Note that both cuts are opposite from each other! This should make it a lot easier to install the top. Trust me on this. I hope this articles will help whoever wants to do their own Heater Box rebuild. If you need help, just email me on the address above. Keep yourself warm during winter season. Happy Motoring!
  3. How to Reuse Heater Motor Metal Fan Blades The replacement heater blower motor is no longer available as a complete assembly; only the blower motor itself. Many of us would like to keep the original metal or aluminum fan blade, but it’s almost impossible to remove the fan blade from the old/seized motor without destroying the pressed in the plastic bushing that the fan sits between. By this decade, any of these bushings have also become brittle and separated. If you have a very early metal blade that came with the set screw, then you may be able to transfer and reuse the blade if the set screw is not rusted out. PRDesignSF has been proud to offer you the plastic fan blade that adapts to the new motor. Since there is a lot less weight for the motor to turn, it puts less stress on the motor, allowing it to last longer while providing almost the same airflow. For those who would like to save and reuse the metal/aluminum blades, we have created an adapter screw from stainless steel that will work. Now you will be able to reuse the metal blade and make it look more original. Here's a quick guide to removing the blade safely without destroying it. The one thing that you do not want to do is attempt to yank the blade off the shaft; you will damage the blade. The metal shaft needs to be cut off and press out. You could reuse the plastic bushing if they are still in good condition, or if you do not want to take a chance for the bushing to become separated in the future, you can use the new adapter screw that we made. With the motor out, separate the plastic body housing by prying the tabs and they will split up. Remove the press-in clip at the end of the shaft and cut the upper support arm bearing housing. This is to create some space for you to be able to cut the shaft. Now you can pull the internal parts out, including the stator, from the housing. There is a square clip at the back of the bearing support arms; pry it with a screwdriver and the support arm will become loose, but still attached to the shaft. It’s seated in a spherical race. You should be able to move it around to create enough space to cut the shaft now. With the shaft cut off, turn the fan upside down and support it with a 14mm deep socket. Now, you can use a punch to drift the shaft out. The bushing will be separated and the fan will be free. The plastic bushing consists of two separate parts, the top half features a built-in key to lock the blade, and the bottom half to keep the upper bushing from coming off the blade by pressing into it. You can clean up the blade, but be very gentle with an aluminum blade: It’s very easy to deform the blade. The adapter screw is very easy to install. Twist the adapter through the fan center hole and tighten it with the nylock nut. Use an 8mm Allen and 14mm socket to tighten the adapter screw. Tightened to 16-18 Ft-Lb. Mark approximately 5 mm from the upper fan body to the shaft; too far out and the fan will interfere with the fresh air flap. You can also tell if you’ve put the fan at the right depth if you have the chamfered edge slightly sticking out from the adapter. Tighten the set screw using a 2mm Allen into the shaft. Because the set screw is cupped, it will bite into the shaft and secure it. Be sure to use thread locker (medium strength) on the set screw to prevent it from backing out. You could also apply a dab of paint on the top of the set screw to provide additional protection from backing out. Optionally (Recommended), you can also cut a divot into the shaft to provide a flat area for the set screw to sit in; it’s still a good idea to apply thread locker onto the set screw. To test proper blade orientation, power up the motor (Male -, Female +). When the blades are facing you, they should be turning counter-clockwise. If you feel a lot of vibration (Light vibration is acceptable), then most likely the blades were not straight. Looking from the side of the motor, check if all the blade’s center ridges are 90 degrees (perpendicular) to the shaft motor, otherwise, they are out of balance. With this, now you have the option of reusing your metal/aluminum blade or plastic blade. Either metal (Used) or plastic fan blades can be purchased from our store as well. Contact us at www.PRDesignsf.com or email support@prdesignsf.com. Happy ’02 motoring! View full article
  4. A few months ago, I wrote an article about repairing the heater valve bracket. You can see that article by clicking the link here. I really thank all of you for reading and all the responses received from the 2002 community. I had a tremendous request on the parts that I designed. Therefore, I decided to make some improvements to the bracket as well as additional parts that make rebuilding the heater box easier. I have gathered and made some special components/parts for those who want to rebuild the box themselves, starting with a new design heater valve bracket. I was fortunate enough to find a heater box top with an intact bracket. I was able to follow the shape of the original bracket, and because of that, the new design will be almost identical to the original bracket. The kit will also available with the other following items: • Heater valve lever with pinch bolt • Rubber grommets and delrin bushings (custom made) • Pre-cut foam kit for the flaps, heater core and perimeter box seals • Heater motor with a new fan blade Those who are interested in the parts can contact me at infous@autodynamiksf.com. This is the picture for the foam & grommet kit. On the left are foam strips for the perimeter box seal (furthest left), and then the heater core seal. In the upper middle area is the foam for the defroster and heater air flaps. Underneath that are two big rings for the heater core outlet. Below that are the flap grommets (the 7 small circular ones). Beneath that is the four relay shaft delrin bushings for the defroster and heater flaps. Beneath that is four spring clips that also go onto the flap shafts. To the right of that is the foam for the fresh air flap. To the furthest right is the foam for the outer box. Version 2 of my heater bracket reinforcement! I’ve updated it so that it looks very similar to the original bracket that was created from the factory. This time, the bracket is made in aluminum, making it lighter than the previous version. If your heater fan motor is seized or making noise, you don’t need to worry. I will show you how to get a replacement parts or you can get it from me. The heater fan motor is still available from Bosch, part # 0 130 007 002. The fan motor comes with a 6 mm shaft, or just slightly under ¼ “. If you buy a ready made fan blade with a ¼“ bore, it will be loose. The only option is to buy a plastic fan blade from Grainger, part # 5JLL6. It should be 5-9/16” Dia, CCW, with a 3/16” bore. This is the closest fan blade to the original aluminum fan blade, except that it is made of plastic and is lighter. Enlarge the bore with a 15/64” drill bit, but make sure that you drill it straight and on center, otherwise it will end up having a wobble (slight wobble is acceptable). I made a special jig to perform this job, since I do quite a bit of these repairs. Once the fan blade is done, press fit it onto the shaft with the clip facing away from the motor, and if you want, you can drop a little glue to make it more secure. You don’t need to balance it, since the blade is so light. It should provide you with plenty of CFM - I think it blows slightly stronger than the original motor. See the pictures below. These images show how I align the fan so that I can drill the fan perfectly centered. The grommets for the heater core outlets are very difficult to acquire. Even though the part is still being made by BMW, they are not available unless someone has old stock (NOS). Most of these grommets are dry, brittle, and torn after 30+ years. You can use sealer or putty to keep it together and seal the box from leaking out air, but it won’t look pretty. I found a replacement heater core outlet grommets (¾”x1/4”x1-⅝”) that were very similar/ acceptable to the original ones, and with slight modification, it would look like almost an oem part (see pictures). The rest of the parts are straightforward, except for the fan blade which was a little bit tricky to do. If you look at the pictures below. I put together a kit for what is necessary to rebuilt the heater box. This is the same kit I use to rebuild heater boxes. These are the grommets for the heater core outlets. The white area is where it is going to be trimmed - Without trimming this, the grommet won’t fit. It would need to be cut ⅜“ from the inside diameter. What you should get is this You should fit it onto the box with the flat side facing to the outside of the box, as shown. But from here, there is still some further modifications that need to be done. Unless you cut out a groove for the pipes, you will have a hard time putting the top cover onto the assembly. This is why I modified the grommets, grind the inside diameter following the outlet heater core pipes by using a die grinder or round file. It should be approximately ground at 30º - 45º. Both the top and bottom of the grommet will need to be cut, but on the opposite sides! This will help the top cover fit easier. After you grind out the groove, it should look like this: On the left side is the outer side of the box; the right image shows what it looks like on the inside. Note that both cuts are opposite from each other! This should make it a lot easier to install the top. Trust me on this. I hope this articles will help whoever wants to do their own Heater Box rebuild. If you need help, just email me on the address above. Keep yourself warm during winter season. Happy Motoring! View full article
  5. One brush in each set is an open circuit, one brush in each set has continuity. These parts could be combined with a little soldering and crimping to make one good brush set for the later style heater blower. One of the plastic bearing covers is sold. Asking $24 shipped to lower 48 w paypal friends
  6. Wanted. Heater box unit with fan and valve assembly in good condition.
  7. Lacking a cap or clip to hold the fan on a heater motor, I'm looking for an effective substitute. Suggestions? Fran Ferrance 1972 2002 Ferrance@aol.com
  8. So my heater fan routinely makes the most annoying high pitched sound that's only remedied by turning it off. I've been told that you can lube the fan, but am struggling to find the exact spot to point my Tri-Flow's nozzle to lube. Anyone have a good picture showing where exactly to lube it? I've searched and only found vague references, not an actual picture showing where. Thanks.
  9. my winter project is to fix the heater fan which doesn't spin. That means removing the heater box. The problem is that the car ('72 2002) has AC, so unless I'm mistaken, I need to remove the AC unit from the console before I can get to the heater box and remove that. Does anyone have experience removing the AC from the console - can I just undo the hoses at the compressor end of the system and just pull it out? (I have already disconnected all the switches, etc, its just plumbing from here on) The AC hasn't worked in a while (so the previous owner told me), so can I assume that the system is dry and there won't be some environmental consequence when I loosen those hose clamps? Any advice would be appreciated! Kenny
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