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Found 30 results

  1. getrag 235/5 close-ratio 5-speed selector rod brand new, never used Part # 25111200818 NLA $120 shipped
  2. Getrag 240.0.0132.90 pulled from an early E30 318i with the M10 motor. I'm an E21 / E30 guy. I pulled this transmission thinking it would be a spare for my E21 but this is the shorter 2 piece 5-speed, not the usual 3 piece and the one my E21 has. I believe this came on the last year of the E21s (1983) and was used for the E30's that came with an M10. Price is firm as thats pretty much what the Pick N Pull charges. $99.99 for the transmission + $29.99 for core + taxes and other CA environmental fees. Prefer someone local and would rather not have to deal with shipping this.
  3. Original Authors: Trent Tilton and Rob Shisler Transmission seals kit Shifter rebuild kit New six- or eight-bolt guibo with new nuts and bolts Center bearing Exhaust flex-sealing ring Clutch kit (including e21 323 throwout bearing) New copper exhaust downpipe nuts (3 of them) Downpipe gasket Slave cylinder Slave cylinder extension hose New set of flywheel/pressure plate bolts We are working on getting part numbers for all these parts. Probably one of the most "transforming" bits of work you can do to an '02 is to remove the standard Getrag 232 four-speed transmission and convert the car to accept a G-245 five speed overdrive transmission from the later '80-83 e21 320i. The overall operation is not that difficult, although it may seem daunting at first. It is a task that can be done by someone with basic mechanical skills in their driveway (although it is preferable to do it on a level surface). For this article, Trent used a kit he got from Dave Varco at www.2002parts.com. Dave is a great guy, and the kit was complete with all the parts listed above without the need to do any fabrication. There are other suppliers who provide kits, or you can make your own kit, but Trent chose Varco's kit because it is complete, priced right, and he happens to be a friend of Trent's. Rob, on the other hand used a DIY setup he pulled from an already-converted parts car, adding some of his own modifications (more on this later). In terms of sourcing a good candidate five speed tranny, the best bet is to just head off to a local boneyard. There are no guarantees with a junkyard tranny, but when compared to the cost of a rebuilt one (at least $600-800 in parts and tools to rebuild yourself or at least twice to 3x that for a pro-built box.) Reputable '02 shops will sell you a known good box for around $350, but Trent chose to roll the dice on a boneyard tranny. He found one at a local yard on a "Half Price Day" for only $75. Even if it is junk, and he has to try again, I'm still saving a little bread for the trade-off of uncertainty and hassle of swapping in a second five-speed, but only if needed. Check to make sure that the seals on your boneyard box are not "ovalized" as this is transferred into the metal housings. This will make it impossible to change the seals with out the new ones leaking. When you get the "new" tranny home, clean it thoroughly with your favorite solvent or degreaser, and order a complete seals kit for it from your favorite parts vendor. You will also want to get a shifter rebuild kit ordered, as well as a new guibo and center bearing. In addition, you will need a new exhaust flex-sealing ring, clutch kit, e21 323 throwout bearing, new copper downpipe nuts, gasket, and possibly a new speedo cable, slave cylinder, and slave cylinder extension hose. [unfortunately, we do not have these part numbers right now, but a call to a knowledgeable parts house should give you the right parts. -Rob] It might also be a good idea to use new guibo nuts and bolts, as these can be subjected to some flexing and metal fatigue over the years. A new set of large flywheel bolts (the ones that hold the flywheel to the crank) is also recommended, but make sure you get the right kind for the size of your flywheel (either 215mm or 228mm). Drain the tranny with a 17mm hex tool or with one you made out of an old VW or similar lug bolt with a nut welded on the other end or a pair of nuts jammed together. You will definitely want to change all the seals on the tranny itself. The fact is they tend to leak after so many years. This includes the rear main seal which requires a thin wall 30mm socket (use an impact wrench to air it off -- or have a shop do it) and change out the seal with a seal puller (or just have the shop do it). Be very careful with the new seals. Put a thin layer of RTV on the outside and some moly grease on the inside edge for starter lubrication. When refilling it, there are a few options. Some prefer the standard GL-4 (non-hypoid) gear oil while others prefer synthetic gear oil like Redline MTL. There is some controversy over synthetics, but rest assured MTL is a good choice, especially if you've gone to the trouble of using new seals. Even ATF can be used with good results. Be aware that some have reported new leaks with synthetics because they can actually clean out gunk that might have been stopping or slowing down leaking spots. Either way, fill the tranny to the point where it begins to come out of the fill hole, then put the plug back in. (Do this with the car or transmission leveled. This is also a good time to rebuild the shifter linkage. All the plastic washers and joints should be replaced. (Check the FAQ Index for this one.) Remember to put back in the exact number in the exact location. This will give your shifter a nice tight feeling. These parts are shared on most BMWs and a good independent shop or dealer should stock them. In terms of the conversion itself, the first thing you need to do is SAFELY elevate the car and put it on jackstands. Ideally you would pick a flat hard surface in a level location (such as inside your garage). If this is unavailable you can do it in the driveway, but make sure the e-brake is on (and working) and/or you have securely chocked up the rear wheels. Start by putting a 2x4 across the cradle of your floor jack to spread the weight a little and lift the car at the center of the front subframe. If you are on a soft surface (NOT RECOMMENDED!), use thick plywood or equivalent to keep the jack and stands from digging into the surface. Place the a couple more 2x4s on top of the stands and then position them under the stamped steel frame rails attached to the front floors of the car. Then, if you are on a flat surface, you can raise the rear of the car in similar fashion, placing the stands under each end of the rear subframe, just next to the mounts. Make sure the whole thing is rock-steady before crawling underneath! Use good quality stands and/or ramps because cheap ones can collapse! Remember: Safety First! Once the car is safely in the air, the first thing to attack is the exhaust system. There are three bolts at the bottom of the exhaust downpipe that will allow you to move the exhaust out of the way. When you remove the down pipe from the manifold, you will need a new gasket. Trent didn't need to totally remove his because it is a custom job that runs under his rear subframe, but on stock cars you will need the room. If your downpipe nuts are rusted on try soaking them with Liquid Wrench and/or blasting them with a torch. If they are REALLY bad, you might need to cut the nuts off (ouch!) with a Dremel or similar tool. Then remove the four Guibo nuts and bolts. Remember to note their direction for reinstallation. Then remove the four bolts that bolt the driveshaft to the differential. Next, remove the two 13mm bolts that hold the center bearing to the tunnel. Watch your head because at this time the driveshaft might fall on it! Next, remove the bolts that hold the transmission to the engine block. Don't forget the stamped metal shield at the bottom of the bell housing, otherwise the tranny wont slide off the flywheel/clutch assembly. Support the rear of the transmission with a jackstand, and then remove the bolts holding the tranny crossmember to the tunnel. Having an assistant at this point is very handy. Next, unhook the linkage at the bottom of the shifter. Finally, carefully slide the tranny off and let it thud to the ground. (Maybe put a stack of magazines under it just to avoid chipping the garage floor-the tranny itself is resaleable if the synchros are still good. Or there is always fleaBay!) Next, remove the old clutch/pressure plate by removing the bolts holding them to the flywheel. You may also want to have the flywheel resurfaced at a machine shop, while you're in there replacing things. Make sure the shop knows to put a .020" "step" on the perimeter of the flywheel so that the pressure plate holds the clutch tight and centered with the intended amount of pressure. While the flywheel is being done, test fit the new tranny to the engine to determine how much and exactly where you need to clearance the tunnel for the slave cylinder. In most cases, a couple good whacks with a big hammer (try to use a non-marring "dead-blow" version) will move the sheet metal enough to make room for the new slave cylinder. Remember that motors move around during spirited driving, so a little "elbow room" is needed. Some kits (like the one from Varco) recommend that you put the slave on after the tranny is already in the car, but the opposite actually appears to be the easier way to do it. Make sure the bleeder valve is pointing down when you install the new slave! At this point we recommend that you make or buy a tranny cradle for your floor jack. It will make your life a hell of a lot easier during the next stage of the conversion. One way is to take a piece of 2x6 wood and then screw or nail a couple of pieces of angle-cut 2x2 on each edge to create a kind of V shape that will steady the tranny enough for you to jack it into position. It is also very helpful to have a friend man the jack while you guide the tranny itself into position. The five speed tranny is exactly 3.6" longer than the four speed it is replacing, which means we need to move the crossmember mounting tabs back in the tunnel exactly that amount. You will also need to shorten the driveshaft by this amount, or buy a kit with a shortened driveshaft in it. The Varco kit I used came with a new set of bolt-on tabs for moving the crossmember and also the shortened driveshaft. You can also cut the mounting tabs out of a donor car (e21 or 02 - it doesn't matter), then grind the tunnel metal off them and then either weld or bolt them to the tunnel in the correct spot. Remember that the elevation is as important as how far back you place the new tabs. To place the tabs with bolts, bolt the transmission to the motor with a couple of bolts and then attach the driveshaft by just snugging up a couple of those bolts too. Put a level on the bottom of the driveshaft on each side of the center bearing to make sure the angles are the same and the transmission is not positioned too high or too low. Take your time at this point because it is critical Drill the holes and bolt the brackets up. Another way to solve the move-the-mounting-tabs problem is to do what Rob did and make a set of rails from some 1" angle iron from a hardware store (or old bedframe) and cut them to fit between the original four-speed mounting tabs and the center bearing mounting tabs further back in the tunnel. Then the cross member just attaches to the rails in the correct spot, while the elevation is just about spot-on perfect just by attaching the cross member directly to the bottom of the rails. If you need to, you can adjust the rear of the tranny down by using some big washers in between the crossmember and the rails, or even up with a little by stacking a (big) washer or two on top of the rubber tranny mount itself. In Trent's case, drilling the holes for the new mounting tabs required pulling back the carpet inside and obviously drilling new holes in the tunnel. The rail method eliminates this alteration of the car's sheetmetal but requires more fabrication of the rails themselves from blank angle iron, as well as some grinding for clearancing the speedo cable. You may also need a little more hammering on the tunnel where the rails run from original crossmember mounting points and the center bearing mounts. Finally, the rails will not hit the original tabs "square" due to the change in elevation from original tranny mounts to center bearing mounts, but this is curable by either cutting the "L" of the angle iron to allow it to bend to fit, or just by tightening the bolts down really hard to force the mounting tabs to bend a little to meet the rails squarely. Its your call on what to do here, but since part of the point of the rail method is to avoid altering the car too much, Rob recommends bending the rails themselves. Once everything is fitted correctly, disassemble everything and remount the flywheel and clutch. The flywheel bolts must be changed with new ones and then torqued to 75 lb.ft. Use a small amount of red locktite on the threads just for luck. Don't put too much because it affects the torque number you need to use due to its lubricating effect during installation. If your new clutch kit didn't come with a centering tool, you can cut the old input shaft off the four speed box and use that. Center the clutch, then carefully bring the new tranny into position. Spin the output flange while engaging the clutch splines to make it easier to engage them. Once all lined up, the tranny should just slide home and fit tight against the block. If it wont slide all the way home, pull it off and check for something in the way or not aligned correctly and try again. After the transmission is bolted up, it is time to just finish up all the little things. The new speedo cable, wire up the reverse lights, bolt the driveshaft back up, re-install the shifter, put the carpet back (if needed), then take for test drive! If you have any questions don't hesitate to post them to the Forum. Trent would like to thank his dad for his help, and Dave @ www.2002parts.com for the kit and great advice!
  4. https://www.ebay.com/itm/142791367362?ul_noapp=true But the shipping is only $590!
  5. I have a 245 Getrag 5-speed Transmission. Has been stored inside garage. I think i even have a new clutch slave cylinder and throw out bearing that will go with it if I can find them. I would prefer pick up but will ship out at buyers expense. May package up and place trans in a plastic tub. I will charge only actual costs. Call/Text me at 858-208-8449 or email colletti.charles@yahoo.com
  6. I purchased this car last month from owner of 12 years to remove the 5-speed and driveshaft to trade out with the 4-speed from my tii resto. Figured I could tool around in until my restoration is complete. After receiving the car and driving it and seeing how original and clean it is; I just couldn't do it. Made it easier when I was able to find a 5-speed here on the FAQ. I purchase in Maryland from a very nice older man; where it was stored in a garage and well taken care of. The car is originally from California and the owner mentioned the engine was a factory replacement but I found a notebook of all repairs and it lists a low mile (55,000) tii motor being installed in car with a carb set up instead of fuel injection. The Pastellblau paint is nice on the car except the hood, will polish up very nice. The Sunroof needs some adjustment, I was able to open and lube up but still won't move with crank. Here is what he lists in his ad about the car. It has some nice enhancements: BMW 2002 tii engine - factory replacement with very low miles (reported to be less than 5000 - I've driven less than 50 miles); BMW 5 speed manual transmission from a BMW E21 320i with short shifter kit - very nice feel BMW E30 325 Lemmerz wheels in basketweave pattern with proper offset ET30 with 4 original BBS center caps (plus 1 spare with no cap); Original Behr radiator upgraded from a BMW 320i; Stahl headers and Ansa exhaust; Has A/C but not used; I think everything is there to get working. Mileage on the chassis is estimated to be about 129,000 (odometer has stopped at 110,992). The interior is in good condition with older style BMW 2002 steering wheel and aftermarket Flofit seats in good shape with no rips but 2 small burn like circles on the upper back left side of the driver side. The dash is in excellent condition with no major cracks (a couple of small splits at the base where the dash rises to fit the instrument speedometer cluster). It starts and drives and stops and all lights work inside and outside. The picture of the engine compartment was taken when it was running - no smoke visible. The Stahl long headers to Ansa free flow exhaust sounds good and noticeable. The radiator and cooling system were flushed in the spring and oil was changed. It was repainted 15 years ago and looks decent (hood paint has dulled and appears to have been replaced, not original as you can see green paint). The hood has rust along the edges on the underside by hinges but does not affect opening and closing or is noticeable from outside . The trunk floor and shock towers are solid with no rust. The seat floor pans are decent with very small rust on the passenger front one. The front windshield needs the lockstrip (included) installed. Windows roll up and down. The driver side inside door panel is loose from the door and just needs new fittings. Tires hold air but are old and should be replaced. I noticed after receiving that the exhaust rattles against the frame as the muffler rubber brackets have broken. I wired up temporarily until I can get to a muffler shop. As is always the problem here in Southern California; I cannot provide a SMOG certificate so it will be sold as a PARTS Car if purchased by someone here and the clean Maryland title provided. I will take better pictures of the car tomorrow. Call/Text at 858-208-8449 or email colletti.charles@yahoo.com
  7. new & original OEM 5-speed mounting brackets Part number 41121808830 NLA message if interested
  8. Original Authors: Trent Tilton and Rob Shisler Transmission seals kit Shifter rebuild kit New six- or eight-bolt guibo with new nuts and bolts Center bearing Exhaust flex-sealing ring Clutch kit (including e21 323 throwout bearing) New copper exhaust downpipe nuts (3 of them) Downpipe gasket Slave cylinder Slave cylinder extension hose New set of flywheel/pressure plate bolts We are working on getting part numbers for all these parts. Probably one of the most "transforming" bits of work you can do to an '02 is to remove the standard Getrag 232 four-speed transmission and convert the car to accept a G-245 five speed overdrive transmission from the later '80-83 e21 320i. The overall operation is not that difficult, although it may seem daunting at first. It is a task that can be done by someone with basic mechanical skills in their driveway (although it is preferable to do it on a level surface). For this article, Trent used a kit he got from Dave Varco at www.2002parts.com. Dave is a great guy, and the kit was complete with all the parts listed above without the need to do any fabrication. There are other suppliers who provide kits, or you can make your own kit, but Trent chose Varco's kit because it is complete, priced right, and he happens to be a friend of Trent's. Rob, on the other hand used a DIY setup he pulled from an already-converted parts car, adding some of his own modifications (more on this later). In terms of sourcing a good candidate five speed tranny, the best bet is to just head off to a local boneyard. There are no guarantees with a junkyard tranny, but when compared to the cost of a rebuilt one (at least $600-800 in parts and tools to rebuild yourself or at least twice to 3x that for a pro-built box.) Reputable '02 shops will sell you a known good box for around $350, but Trent chose to roll the dice on a boneyard tranny. He found one at a local yard on a "Half Price Day" for only $75. Even if it is junk, and he has to try again, I'm still saving a little bread for the trade-off of uncertainty and hassle of swapping in a second five-speed, but only if needed. Check to make sure that the seals on your boneyard box are not "ovalized" as this is transferred into the metal housings. This will make it impossible to change the seals with out the new ones leaking. When you get the "new" tranny home, clean it thoroughly with your favorite solvent or degreaser, and order a complete seals kit for it from your favorite parts vendor. You will also want to get a shifter rebuild kit ordered, as well as a new guibo and center bearing. In addition, you will need a new exhaust flex-sealing ring, clutch kit, e21 323 throwout bearing, new copper downpipe nuts, gasket, and possibly a new speedo cable, slave cylinder, and slave cylinder extension hose. [unfortunately, we do not have these part numbers right now, but a call to a knowledgeable parts house should give you the right parts. -Rob] It might also be a good idea to use new guibo nuts and bolts, as these can be subjected to some flexing and metal fatigue over the years. A new set of large flywheel bolts (the ones that hold the flywheel to the crank) is also recommended, but make sure you get the right kind for the size of your flywheel (either 215mm or 228mm). Drain the tranny with a 17mm hex tool or with one you made out of an old VW or similar lug bolt with a nut welded on the other end or a pair of nuts jammed together. You will definitely want to change all the seals on the tranny itself. The fact is they tend to leak after so many years. This includes the rear main seal which requires a thin wall 30mm socket (use an impact wrench to air it off -- or have a shop do it) and change out the seal with a seal puller (or just have the shop do it). Be very careful with the new seals. Put a thin layer of RTV on the outside and some moly grease on the inside edge for starter lubrication. When refilling it, there are a few options. Some prefer the standard GL-4 (non-hypoid) gear oil while others prefer synthetic gear oil like Redline MTL. There is some controversy over synthetics, but rest assured MTL is a good choice, especially if you've gone to the trouble of using new seals. Even ATF can be used with good results. Be aware that some have reported new leaks with synthetics because they can actually clean out gunk that might have been stopping or slowing down leaking spots. Either way, fill the tranny to the point where it begins to come out of the fill hole, then put the plug back in. (Do this with the car or transmission leveled. This is also a good time to rebuild the shifter linkage. All the plastic washers and joints should be replaced. (Check the FAQ Index for this one.) Remember to put back in the exact number in the exact location. This will give your shifter a nice tight feeling. These parts are shared on most BMWs and a good independent shop or dealer should stock them. In terms of the conversion itself, the first thing you need to do is SAFELY elevate the car and put it on jackstands. Ideally you would pick a flat hard surface in a level location (such as inside your garage). If this is unavailable you can do it in the driveway, but make sure the e-brake is on (and working) and/or you have securely chocked up the rear wheels. Start by putting a 2x4 across the cradle of your floor jack to spread the weight a little and lift the car at the center of the front subframe. If you are on a soft surface (NOT RECOMMENDED!), use thick plywood or equivalent to keep the jack and stands from digging into the surface. Place the a couple more 2x4s on top of the stands and then position them under the stamped steel frame rails attached to the front floors of the car. Then, if you are on a flat surface, you can raise the rear of the car in similar fashion, placing the stands under each end of the rear subframe, just next to the mounts. Make sure the whole thing is rock-steady before crawling underneath! Use good quality stands and/or ramps because cheap ones can collapse! Remember: Safety First! Once the car is safely in the air, the first thing to attack is the exhaust system. There are three bolts at the bottom of the exhaust downpipe that will allow you to move the exhaust out of the way. When you remove the down pipe from the manifold, you will need a new gasket. Trent didn't need to totally remove his because it is a custom job that runs under his rear subframe, but on stock cars you will need the room. If your downpipe nuts are rusted on try soaking them with Liquid Wrench and/or blasting them with a torch. If they are REALLY bad, you might need to cut the nuts off (ouch!) with a Dremel or similar tool. Then remove the four Guibo nuts and bolts. Remember to note their direction for reinstallation. Then remove the four bolts that bolt the driveshaft to the differential. Next, remove the two 13mm bolts that hold the center bearing to the tunnel. Watch your head because at this time the driveshaft might fall on it! Next, remove the bolts that hold the transmission to the engine block. Don't forget the stamped metal shield at the bottom of the bell housing, otherwise the tranny wont slide off the flywheel/clutch assembly. Support the rear of the transmission with a jackstand, and then remove the bolts holding the tranny crossmember to the tunnel. Having an assistant at this point is very handy. Next, unhook the linkage at the bottom of the shifter. Finally, carefully slide the tranny off and let it thud to the ground. (Maybe put a stack of magazines under it just to avoid chipping the garage floor-the tranny itself is resaleable if the synchros are still good. Or there is always fleaBay!) Next, remove the old clutch/pressure plate by removing the bolts holding them to the flywheel. You may also want to have the flywheel resurfaced at a machine shop, while you're in there replacing things. Make sure the shop knows to put a .020" "step" on the perimeter of the flywheel so that the pressure plate holds the clutch tight and centered with the intended amount of pressure. While the flywheel is being done, test fit the new tranny to the engine to determine how much and exactly where you need to clearance the tunnel for the slave cylinder. In most cases, a couple good whacks with a big hammer (try to use a non-marring "dead-blow" version) will move the sheet metal enough to make room for the new slave cylinder. Remember that motors move around during spirited driving, so a little "elbow room" is needed. Some kits (like the one from Varco) recommend that you put the slave on after the tranny is already in the car, but the opposite actually appears to be the easier way to do it. Make sure the bleeder valve is pointing down when you install the new slave! At this point we recommend that you make or buy a tranny cradle for your floor jack. It will make your life a hell of a lot easier during the next stage of the conversion. One way is to take a piece of 2x6 wood and then screw or nail a couple of pieces of angle-cut 2x2 on each edge to create a kind of V shape that will steady the tranny enough for you to jack it into position. It is also very helpful to have a friend man the jack while you guide the tranny itself into position. The five speed tranny is exactly 3.6" longer than the four speed it is replacing, which means we need to move the crossmember mounting tabs back in the tunnel exactly that amount. You will also need to shorten the driveshaft by this amount, or buy a kit with a shortened driveshaft in it. The Varco kit I used came with a new set of bolt-on tabs for moving the crossmember and also the shortened driveshaft. You can also cut the mounting tabs out of a donor car (e21 or 02 - it doesn't matter), then grind the tunnel metal off them and then either weld or bolt them to the tunnel in the correct spot. Remember that the elevation is as important as how far back you place the new tabs. To place the tabs with bolts, bolt the transmission to the motor with a couple of bolts and then attach the driveshaft by just snugging up a couple of those bolts too. Put a level on the bottom of the driveshaft on each side of the center bearing to make sure the angles are the same and the transmission is not positioned too high or too low. Take your time at this point because it is critical Drill the holes and bolt the brackets up. Another way to solve the move-the-mounting-tabs problem is to do what Rob did and make a set of rails from some 1" angle iron from a hardware store (or old bedframe) and cut them to fit between the original four-speed mounting tabs and the center bearing mounting tabs further back in the tunnel. Then the cross member just attaches to the rails in the correct spot, while the elevation is just about spot-on perfect just by attaching the cross member directly to the bottom of the rails. If you need to, you can adjust the rear of the tranny down by using some big washers in between the crossmember and the rails, or even up with a little by stacking a (big) washer or two on top of the rubber tranny mount itself. In Trent's case, drilling the holes for the new mounting tabs required pulling back the carpet inside and obviously drilling new holes in the tunnel. The rail method eliminates this alteration of the car's sheetmetal but requires more fabrication of the rails themselves from blank angle iron, as well as some grinding for clearancing the speedo cable. You may also need a little more hammering on the tunnel where the rails run from original crossmember mounting points and the center bearing mounts. Finally, the rails will not hit the original tabs "square" due to the change in elevation from original tranny mounts to center bearing mounts, but this is curable by either cutting the "L" of the angle iron to allow it to bend to fit, or just by tightening the bolts down really hard to force the mounting tabs to bend a little to meet the rails squarely. Its your call on what to do here, but since part of the point of the rail method is to avoid altering the car too much, Rob recommends bending the rails themselves. Once everything is fitted correctly, disassemble everything and remount the flywheel and clutch. The flywheel bolts must be changed with new ones and then torqued to 75 lb.ft. Use a small amount of red locktite on the threads just for luck. Don't put too much because it affects the torque number you need to use due to its lubricating effect during installation. If your new clutch kit didn't come with a centering tool, you can cut the old input shaft off the four speed box and use that. Center the clutch, then carefully bring the new tranny into position. Spin the output flange while engaging the clutch splines to make it easier to engage them. Once all lined up, the tranny should just slide home and fit tight against the block. If it wont slide all the way home, pull it off and check for something in the way or not aligned correctly and try again. After the transmission is bolted up, it is time to just finish up all the little things. The new speedo cable, wire up the reverse lights, bolt the driveshaft back up, re-install the shifter, put the carpet back (if needed), then take for test drive! If you have any questions don't hesitate to post them to the Forum. Trent would like to thank his dad for his help, and Dave @ www.2002parts.com for the kit and great advice! View full article
  9. Up for sale is a 320is donor car that I bought for my next 2002 build. I would prefer to sell whole, but will part it if I have to. 204,XXX, 5 speed, recaros, 3.91 LSD, sport steering wheel etc. Located an hour south of Portland, Oregon. I purchased the car out of a driveway, it had been left in his mothers driveway when the owner moved to California after college. After talking to him he has owned it for 22 years, and had the head completely rebuilt in 2009. In it's current state it will start and run enough to get it on a trailer, but it's not road worthy. I have driven it around my property enough to know that it shifts good, no weird noises from the rear end etc. if it doesn't sell in the immediate future I plan on cleaning/repairing the fuel system and will update this ad. Brand new in tank e21 fuel pump, cap, rotor, and plugs in the last month. Open to offers on parts, if I get enough interest I'll consider a part out. kodyroth@gmail.com
  10. Hi All, I would like to purchase a 5-speed close ratio shift knob like the one pictured. Let me know if you have one available. Thank you.
  11. WTB: Getrag 245/5 Transmission Please reply here or PM with: Info, Picture, Condition/Description, Location, Willingness to Pack and Ship and Asking Price Thank you!
  12. Price:: 1.00 Location: : Woodland Park, Co 80863 I have the following NOS Genuine BMW parts. 2-NOS part# 34 21 1 117 104 FAG rear wheel cylinders $50.00 pair NOS GK water pump bmw part #11 51 1 256 600 $35.00 NOS ATE Clutch Slave cylinder BMW part #21 52 1 116 300 $30.00 NOS Crank Sprocket bmw part # 11 21 1 260 571 fits 4cyl 1969-78 $25.00 NOS Drive shaft Center support bearing part# 26 11 1 206 502 $10.00 4-NOS 2002 rear wheel seals $10.00 NOS Wood gear shift knob part# 82 11 9 413 989 $40.00 NOS Repco front brake pads part #34 11 1 150 527r all 320 $30.00 5 NOS BMW wheel emblems 2-1/2” dia part #36 13 1 117 648 $10.00 each 4 NOS BMW wheel emblems 2-3/4” dia part #36 13 1 122 648 $10.00 each NOS Elring Timing case gasket set part #11 14 1 727 986 $15.00 NOS Dietz Drive shaft flex joint part #26 11 1 106 116 $20.00 NOS Elring FT case seal kit part #11 14 1 709 632 $10.00 NOS Cam Sprocket 4 cyl to ’79 part#11 31 0 631 105 $40.00 NOS Trunk Seal part # 51 71 5 476 161 $ 30.00 Also have 10 new boge bushingspart #2-31-003271-03 e15 not sure where they go but they are labeled for a 2002. The following are used parts 5-speed train 3 bolt spline with drive shaft $500.00 Complete engine out of my 76 ran when removed 2 years ago $500.00 Pair of doors off my 1976 2002 the bottoms are rusted but the chrome and glass and all are in great shape Make an offer New IE silicone hose set black $70.00 Rear glass make offer Pedal box $25.00 Set of steel wheels 75.00 Pair of tail lights from my 76 small crack in lens but can hardly be seen $150.00 Other parts to be listed soon let me know what you may need.
  13. I'm slowly working through my 5-speed shifter set up, using an IE shift plate, DSSR and Nardi gearknob. I also have an IE "short shifter" I won't be using, so I'm thinking about customising the old E21 shift lever to give the reduced throw and angles I'd prefer. The squishiness of the rubber insulated shift lever feels quite odd to me, is this supposed to remove the feel of engine vibrations? Are they especially bad for some reason? (i've never driven a manual 2002) What other products will give me precise, firm, somewhat notchy shift feel?
  14. I bought the drivetrain from an '82 318i, diff and driveshafts included, and wonder if its really worth doing when i swap in the 5speed. I'll probably want an LSD down the track but not for a while. will a custom 5-speed tailshaft work with both diffs or are the forward lengths or input flanges different between a 12/'75 2002 and a E21 318i?
  15. Hello everybody, I'm undertaking a 5-speed swap on my '75. Most things are going fine, but I can't figure out how to stop a small but bothersome oil leak from the input side of my Getrag 245. I've replaced all the seals listed in the 5 speed swap guide, but oil is seeping from the mating point of the flange for that tubular part the throwout bearing slides on (23111224420, "housing cover") and the face of the transmission, inside the bellhousing. It looks like the input shaft seal is the only sealing part in this assembly, which surprises me since it seems there is nothing to stop oil from leaking from the flange of that tubular piece. The parts diagrams don't show any gasket, so I'm at a loss. Also, what is correct direction to install the input shaft seal? It isn't obvious to me since it seems housing cover would orient the seal backwards on the input shaft if I were to install it with the front facing out of the back of the housing cover. Initially I suspected that big black plug (23111606108) was the culprit, but I don't think that's the case (but I'm still not sure). Any suggestions?
  16. Can anyone give me a little clarity about the differences in between the different stock and aftermarket downpipes that are available? I have searched the forums, and clearly there are differences, but I am looking for some more quantitative information, particularly about whether any of them result in a different position for the position of the flange to the resonator As background, I have a 1969 '02 which originally was a 4-speed manual. When I got it, it had a rusted out exhaust system. I replaced what was there with a Tii exhaust manifold and an IE stainless system (their earlier style with two resonators), and kept the downpipe that was on the car that I assume was original. The sound was great, but fitment was finicky (it was very tight to the underside of the car) and it took a lot of futzing to get things to line up without part of the resonator knocking on one thing or another, but I eventually did... Fast forward to a recent 5-speed conversion. After much knocking out of the tranny tunnel for the clutch slave, carefully placing the cross-member support, etc., I was happy with the positioning. I don't think the final alignment of the tranny moved the engine position much, but it might be tilted very slight up as the back of the downpipe seems a little closer to the bottom of the passenger compartment by perhaps an 1/8 of an inch. Unfortunately, there isn't much clearance and that 1/8th or so is looking critical. Equally a problem is that the back of the downpipe is almost directly below the passenger side tranny cross member mount and there isn't much clearance between the bolt and nut holding the cross member on that side and the downpipe..... It is also tight below the center bearing and driveshaft... Ideally, I would like to get the output flange down a little lower... As best I can tell, the motor mounts are OK and the engine itself is sitting where it should... Soooo: This is what I think I have figured out from searching and diagrams... 1. Stock downpipe is PN 18111104684 2. Automatic downpipe is PN 18111104922. From other posts, this is said to swing out wider to clear the wider automatic tranny. Are there other differences and where does this move the output flange? 3. IE stainless downpipe. Alleged to be somewhat more like the automatic downpipe. Where does this move the output flange? 4. Other aftermarket? Right now I am debating between buying a new downpipe and seeing if I can get more clearance by making some judicious pie cuts on the existing downpipe just behind where the two pipes fuse into one in order to bend/route it slightly downward. Thoughts and advice?
  17. I bought what was ostensibly a cut from the front of an E21 driveshaft with the 3-bolt flange yoke to use with my Getrag 245 5-speed swap. I've noticed that the holes on the 3-bolt flange yoke are threaded, but in all of the photos I've seen online the holes are through and a lock nut is used. I've perused realoem trying to figure out what I've got, but I can't seem to figure it out. It appears to fit the 28 mm thick 6-bolt guibo. I don't anticipate any problem using a flange yoke that has threads as long as I liberally apply Loctite, so I had my old driveshaft modified to use it, but I'm still curious what it might be from. Any ideas?
  18. My '73 2002tii recently blew the head gasket internally and I've decided due to high wear on the rings and bottom end, I'm going to go all in and have the motor rebuilt. I'm shipping the car off the Jim Rowe at Metric Mechanic to have the motor built and have a 5-speed conversion done using a Getrag 245 5-speed trans. I'm investing a lot in the motor, so to keep the total cost of the project within reason, I'm contemplating having the 5-speed conversion done using an inspected, bench tested, and re-sealed trans, vs. paying the extra $2k for a full rebuild. From the research I'v done, I know the 245 is a pretty bullet proof box, and a good used one will probably be fine for my application (weekend fun car). Jim thinks this is a good approach since I won't be racing our autocrossing the car. On the other hand, I know if I invest the extra cash in a full rebuild it will be a much better trans that will probably shift smoother, will take any beating I can give it, and will last the life of the car. I'm interested in feedback from anyone who has gone thru this with a 245 used for a conversion. In particular, if you worked with Metric Mechanic to have your conversion done, you inputs would be much appreciated. Thanks all for your consideration.
  19. I'm in the process of doing a 5-speed conversion to my 2002. As part of this process I'm resealing the 245 5-speed that is going into the car. When I removed the input shaft guide sleeve this is what I found: I consulted the manual and found this procedure for calculating the proper shim thickness: I also set up a dial indicator to measure front-to-back movement with everything installed: The manual say adjust shim thickness until there is no front-to-back play. What advise do you have? Where can I get these shims? What would have caused the shim to be damaged like this? I will be resealing the rear seal as soon as I can find/make a socket to remove the nut. As usual, any/all helpful advise is much appreciated.
  20. Hey everyone, noob here with a question about tranny swapping and distributor details... First off I'd like to introduce myself, My name is Peter and I have just bought my 1976 2002 automatic here in the Bay Area, CA. This is my first one, Ive owned 2 E28's, a 325is E30, and a bulletproof but junky E36. Anyways, It's just me and my '02 now...beside one E28 that is for sale. I wanted to do the 5-speed swap and am already sourcing parts that I need. The car needs a few essential things beforehand, such as a new front end seal and maybe a few other seals...it sure is wet down there. Also new suspension bushings all around, followed by an alignment. So the problem is, I also need a distributor assembly but when I called BMW they say that they no longer manufacturer them. So I go check for remaned ones and I can only find standard trans parts. Now I can always send my broken one out to be fixed but here is my dilemma... Should I spend all that money fixing an auto distributor when I plan on doing the swap sometime in the near future or should I just hold off and get the part I need when I swap over? And secondly, if I switch to the 5speed from the 320i would I just use the distributor for the '76 2002 standard trans? Or would I need one from a 320i?... I know this might be a dumb question, just wondering if anyone out there can help. Much appreciated, thanks Peter
  21. Not mine, no affiliation, etc... Perfect donor car to upgrade to a 5 speed for your 2002. Ad is two weeks old so car may be gone by now. E21 5 speed donor cars are getting harder to find, if you see one, jump on it because it may be gone the next time you go look at it. http://atlanta.craigslist.org/wat/cto/4796634491.html G-Man
  22. A freshly rebuilt BMW 235 Getrag Close Ratio "Dog Leg" 5 Speed Transmission. This transmission was factory installed in a 71 BMW 2002 I acquired. It had a bad output shaft, (worn splines), so I acquired a NOS output shaft from Uraguay and took the whole kit to Bavarian Rennsport in Ramona, CA. Bill Holmes disassembled everything, replaced everything that was showing any wear, (shift rack mounts, shift knuckles, pivot bushings, pins, etc.), cleaned and polished all bearing surfaces and installed the new main shaft. Synchros and bearings looked great and everything was reassembled and sealed with new seals and gaskets. Now you can find these rare transmissions for around $2K in unknown condition, or you can buy mine with the knowledge that it was rebuilt correctly with all new OEM parts. This sale includes everything you need to install it in your BMW 2002 (228mm flywheel), you will need to trade-in the throwout bearing for cars equipped with a 215mm flywheel. It includes the shortened shift platform and shortened driveshaft with a new installed center bearing. It also includes a new slave cylinder. I am willing to ship, but I work full time, so it won't be expedited, or you can come pick it up. Feel free to e-mail or PM me with any questions. Now on ebay, no reserve... http://www.ebay.com/itm/121759960113?item=121759960113&viewitem=&vxp=mtr Thanks, Mark92131
  23. Price:: 300 Location: : San Jose, CA SHORTENED DRIVESHAFT FOR A BMW 2002 WITH A 5 SPEED, 4 BOLT FLANGE FLANGE TO FLANGE LENGTH IS 59 3/4" NEW U-JOINTS AND CENTER BEARING, BALANCED WORK DONE BY SOUTHBAY DRIVELINE IN SAN JOSE, CA. PREFER LOCAL SALE BUT WILL SHIP AT BUYERS EXPENSE FROM 95136
  24. Price:: 3500.00 Location: : San Diego, CA Just a heads up that the sale of my rebuilt BMW Getrag 235/5 Close Ratio "Dog Leg" 5-Speed Transmission is coming to a close. These don't come up for sale very often and parts are getting expensive and hard to find. This box was expertly rebuilt by Bill Holmes of Bavarian Rennsport in Ramona, CA. Every component was inspected and everything that was suspect or worn was replaced. Includes a factory shortened drive shaft with new center bearing, slave cylinder and throwout bearing for a 228mm flywheel. All you need is an 8-bolt Guibo and transmission support bracket, (you could probably use the U-shaped one for the 245/5 Getrag and adjust the holes for the difference in transmission length). Any questions, just ping me. Thanks, Mark92131 Ebay Auction Link... http://www.ebay.com/itm/121759960113?item=121759960113&viewitem=&vxp=mtr&rmvSB=true
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