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Found 37 results

  1. Hey, so a friend of mine has sold off his auto junk yard after 45 years. he is getting rid of a lot of parts. one guy was there on his third trip and all he is taking is British stuff, don't ask me why. maybe he likes warm beer too. anyway i am rounding up just 2002 stuff and bring it home to the warehouse building. 2002's were some of his best selling stuff back in his hay day. at one point he employed 18 people. now he is lucky if he gets one call a day for any kind of parts. so he gives me a holler and hauls this out and now the only marking on the entire unit. and now a full view. so for all you old timers, does anyone have a guess as to who made this. as for the unit i like it because it really is not wider than a standard console except for the bump outs. i will be opening it up to investigate the guts in the next few days. sorry about the picture orientation. thanks, stone
  2. Hi all, I'm getting ready to install A/C on my '75 and I need to replace the expansion valve on my Frigiking evaporator. Does anyone know where to get a new valve? I've looked at a few other topics on this but can't find any definitive answers, just the advice to get a new one. Here are some photos: This this one from Nostalgic A/C looks close - will it work? http://nostalgicac.com/driers-valves/expansion-valves/oring-expansion-valve.html thanks, Garrett
  3. Price:: 1000 Location: : Boulder, CO Edit: System is sold! I have a complete Behr A/C system that I just removed from my '72 2002. The system was 100% operational and blowing cold when I removed it from the car. Includes the following: 1. Center console unit with both control knobs, hazard switch, ash tray, and side panels. 2. Compressor, compressor bracket for M10, belt and tensioner for compressor. (bracket and tensioner/belt are not pictured but are included) 3. Condensor/fan unit. 4. All wiring and relays needed for installation. 5. All hoses needed for installation. 6. 95% of the hardware needed, except for the few nuts/washers that invariably get dropped and roll under the toolbox every time I work on the car. This is as complete a system as you will find. Condition is as pictured. Clean it up, install, and go! Will ship at buyer's expense if necessary.
  4. Anybody have an A/C Line Crimp tool? I'd hate to drop $150 on something for a 1 time use. (As if I don't have enough specialty tools already!) http://www.amazon.com/Mastercool-71550-Conditioner-Hose-Crimper/dp/B000WBQ4U2/ref=pd_sim_sbs_hi_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=1SF52J96CCB8MJD2BA1Z
  5. my winter project is to fix the heater fan which doesn't spin. That means removing the heater box. The problem is that the car ('72 2002) has AC, so unless I'm mistaken, I need to remove the AC unit from the console before I can get to the heater box and remove that. Does anyone have experience removing the AC from the console - can I just undo the hoses at the compressor end of the system and just pull it out? (I have already disconnected all the switches, etc, its just plumbing from here on) The AC hasn't worked in a while (so the previous owner told me), so can I assume that the system is dry and there won't be some environmental consequence when I loosen those hose clamps? Any advice would be appreciated! Kenny
  6. Having recently completed my air conditioning system, i thought i would layout what it takes to install your own modern air conditioning system. Air conditioning is one of those mysterious things that everyone is afraid of when in actuality its not much more complicated that the coolant system on an M10. There is a liquid that gets pumped around a sealed system and as it expands it cools and then we compress it again through the compressor, lower its temperature though the condenser and then repeat the process. A basic air conditioning system is made up of the following components. Evaporator (The unit that mounts in the vehicle and has your AC controls and vents) Compressor and mounting bracket Condenser (The radiator that mounts at the front of the car in the engine bay) Electric push fan Hoses and dryer I will discuss what you need to know about each component: EVAPORATOR This is going to be the toughest component to track down because you cannot buy a new unit. 2002 did not come with air conditioning from factory and so you have to track down an aftermarket unit from the 70's that was installed into the cars by the dealer. You need to source a used Clady, Behr or Fridgeking evaporator / center console though the for sale forums. Any unit you get should be pressure tested and the expansion valve replaced. This is my Behr system. The systems all look different and different people prefer the looks of different systems. The evaporator produces a large amount of water when it operates and the evaporators have a water drain hole in the bottom. You will need to drill a hole through the top of the transmission tunnel to install a rubber drain hose so that the water doesn't flood your interior. The switches for the evaporator should be cleaned, checked for electrical function. Remember old evaporators use flare fittings. Modern hose kits are O ring kits. You will need flare to O ring adapters that are used with flare fittings in order to convert the flare fittings to O ring fittings. #6 and #10 flare adapters. https://nostalgicac.com/fittings-hose-kits/flare-adapters/6-flare-to-o-ring-fitting-adapter.html https://nostalgicac.com/fittings-hose-kits/flare-adapters/10-flare-to-o-ring-fitting-adapter.html You can also buy copper crush washers which go into the flare adapters to help with the seal if your flare ends aren't in pristine condition. COMPRESSOR AND BRACKET We will keep this simple. The old system compressors are much larger and heavier than modern rotary style compressors. Dont even bother with an old compressor. Buy a modern Sanden 508 compressor. You can buy genuine Sanden for $250 or a chinese knockoff for $130-$150. You will need a V belt model and these can be gotten from Ebay or http://nostalgicac.com/. Very important. The Compressors must be filed with oil. There are different types of oil and some oils are compatible with old style freon (R12) and some are compatible with new style freon (R134a). Since R12 can no longer be obtained you might as well plan on using R134a freon which mean Pag or Ester oil. Compressor uses 6oz of oil after you fully drain all the shipping oil from the unit. The bracket is easy. The Clardy system came with a bracket that fits the Sanden 508 compressor but also luckily a 2002faq member is now making an excellent bracket which can be bought from hobiedave. http://www.bmw2002faq.com/topic/82340-custom-made-ac-compressor-brackets-sold-out/?hl=hobiedave Blunttech now also sells a Sanden 508 bracket https://www.blunttech.com/shop/replacement-parts/climate-control/1448btkt CONDENSER The condenser is simply a matter of size. The bigger the better but you need to factor in how big can you fit into the nose of the 2002 and whether or not you are willing to cut the support bars to fit a larger condenser. A 9" x 12" condenser fits perfectly with no cutting however that is definitely considered on the small size. They make 10" x 18" condensers which might just fit without cutting but i have not tested this. You will need to decide how big you want to go here. You will need to mount this to the front of the nose, there are condenser mounting straps or you can zip tie it in depending on how much drilling and modifying you want to do. FAN You will need an electric fan on a relay kit to blow air through the condenser. The fan should be sized appropriately to fit into the nose of the 2002. I used a 10 inch fan which in my opinion fit perfectly. Don't forget to power the fan directly from the battery with a relay kit since it draws a lot of amps. HOSES AND DRYER People get scared by the plumbing of the AC system, but its actually very simple. There are standard AC hose sizes and certain sizes go between certain components. You will use #10, #8 and #6 size hose in your install. The #10 runs from the evaporator to the compressor. The #8 runs from the compressor to the Condenser. The #6 runs from the condenser to the dryer and then back to the evaporator. Ebay and http://nostalgicac.com/ sell "Hose Kits" which include the hoses, connections, safety switch and the dryer. Buy a universal kit and it should have everything you need! The safety switch measures freon pressure levels and cutoff the system if levels get too high or too low. It gets wired in series with the AC controls and compressor. To make your own AC lines you will need a crimper tool. I used this one and it worked great. I also used a substance called Nyloc with all my o ring fittings. Its a type of AC sealant and you coat the O rings in it before tightening and it helps to minimize any leaks. This stuff is option but recommended. Once everything is installed you will need to have the system charged with freon by a professional AC shop. But if everything goes to plan you will have good cold AC for under $1000. EDIT: If you wish to charge the system your self, you will need a proper 3 line gauge set ($35 on ebay) and a vacuum pump ($50 on ebay) Attach the low and high pressure lines to the AC system, attach vacuum pump to yellow line and start vacuuming. Open low pressure side valve on gauge and allow pressure to drop to -30psi. Vacuum for 30 minutes to remove moisture and air from system. Close low pressure valve and remove pump. Make sure system holds negative pressure for 30 minutes to ensure no leaks. Afterwards attach a can of Freon to yellow line. Start car and turn on AC to max. Open low pressure valve and let Freon into system. Low pressure should jump up to 60 psi but then the compressor should kick on and pressure will drop down to below 20. Note that the compressor pulley always spins but only when the clutch kicks in and the center part of the pulley is spinning is Freon being pumped! System will likely need 2 cans of R134a Freon (Maybe a little more. 3 cans is too much). We want low pressure of about 30-35 psi and high pressure around 250 on a nice day. (Pressures vary by day time temperatures). Remember to close the low pressure valve when switching Freon cans. Also the gauges pressures sometimes take a while to settle so add the 2 cans and then rev the motor up and let the system cycle a bit before deciding if pressures are right or if more is needed. A system with too much Freon will not cool! More is not better! View full article
  7. A fantastic way to modernize your BMW 2002 and get rid of problematic old heater box and revamped AC evaporators. Specially engineered to fit precisely in OEM space and for center console to remain stock in size or smaller ! We have installed in several cars works famously including ability to run vents to sides of dash for better air flow. A BIG upgrade for your BMW 2002. Installation requires no special skills but do need to have basic AC skills to charge unit with freon. http://www.dtechparts.com/bmw-2002-heat-and-ac-evaporator-new-redesigned-as-modern-car/ Installed is less weight then original heater box and AC, works with existing heat / ac setup under hood or we also provide complete kit to modernize under hood AC components as well. This kit will modernize your existing AC evaporator (Fridgking, Behr, Clarty, or aftermarket) http://www.dtechparts.com/bmw-2002-complete-a-c-kit/ We can offer consoles designed and covered in your choice of leather, vinyl, stitch etc. for slight up-charge. Based unit comes with console sides covered in black vinyl. Can use an OEM Behr front face plate for true original look or we can provide center piece you can use to cut in your choice of radio, flasher button, controls. We suggest using a double DIN low profile stereo / monitor like pictured We can also do install for you we are in Dallas TX. We will provide phone support to assist you remotely as best we can. Pictured here with optional backup camera
  8. Has anyone every built an M10 turbo motor (top mount turbo/manifold) with an A/C compressor/bracket from the early E30 318i? I'm turbo'ing my M10 but I want to put a Sanden AC compressor on it using some sort of adapter bracket. My concern is the manifold interfering with the compressor.
  9. I installed a Clardy air conditioning unit in my '76 when the car was new and it's actually worked great ever since -- for '02 air conditioning, which is, to say, well below the air conditioning standards of Detroit in '76. But among the unit's "design quirks," the right console panel is partially secured by a 1 1/8" screw through the panel and directly into the A/C's blower, which intrudes noticeably into the passenger foot well. Over the last 39 years, I'm confident I've removed and replaced that panel 25 times -- to futz with the radio, look for the dropped tii clock thumbscrews, etc. And I always wondered why I never "stabbed" the blower fan with that 1 1/8" screw through its heart. Mind you, the factory instructions told me to put this screw exactly there and I never considered using a different fastener or a different location. Two months ago, however, while planning the installation of a Becker Grand Prix Stereo in the car -- its first radio was a Europa II Stereo -- I managed to "stab" the blower wheel with that 1 1/8" screw! I didn't realize it until I turned on the A/C and the blower wheel made a frightening "this is my last revolution" noise, followed by utter silence. And that...mishap, led me to discover that both the original blower housing and blower wheel remain in production by the original manufacturer, American Plasti-Plate of Tyler, Texas. The housing is their part number BH 4500 and the wheel is their part number BW 45-325. American Plasti-Plate doesn't sell retail, but Arizona Mobile Air Inc. (ACKits.com) handles American Plasti-Plate parts. Arizona Mobile Air refers to the housing as part number 28-91496 (Blower Housing w/Flange BH 4500), $17.36 currently, and the wheel as part number 28-01716 (Blower Wheel ABS with Clip), $12.76 currently. The housing is back ordered for 4 months but the wheel is in stock. I'm looking for a more-or-less exact replacement for the electric blower motor but I haven't yet identified the best candidate! Regards, Steve
  10. Having recently completed my air conditioning system, i thought i would layout what it takes to install your own modern air conditioning system. Air conditioning is one of those mysterious things that everyone is afraid of when in actuality its not much more complicated that the coolant system on an M10. There is a liquid that gets pumped around a sealed system and as it expands it cools and then we compress it again through the compressor, lower its temperature though the condenser and then repeat the process. A basic air conditioning system is made up of the following components. Evaporator (The unit that mounts in the vehicle and has your AC controls and vents) Compressor and mounting bracket Condenser (The radiator that mounts at the front of the car in the engine bay) Electric push fan Hoses and dryer I will discuss what you need to know about each component: EVAPORATOR This is going to be the toughest component to track down because you cannot buy a new unit. 2002 did not come with air conditioning from factory and so you have to track down an aftermarket unit from the 70's that was installed into the cars by the dealer. You need to source a used Clady, Behr or Fridgeking evaporator / center console though the for sale forums. Any unit you get should be pressure tested and the expansion valve replaced. This is my Behr system. The systems all look different and different people prefer the looks of different systems. The evaporator produces a large amount of water when it operates and the evaporators have a water drain hole in the bottom. You will need to drill a hole through the top of the transmission tunnel to install a rubber drain hose so that the water doesn't flood your interior. The switches for the evaporator should be cleaned, checked for electrical function. Remember old evaporators use flare fittings. Modern hose kits are O ring kits. You will need flare to O ring adapters that are used with flare fittings in order to convert the flare fittings to O ring fittings. #6 and #10 flare adapters. https://nostalgicac.com/fittings-hose-kits/flare-adapters/6-flare-to-o-ring-fitting-adapter.html https://nostalgicac.com/fittings-hose-kits/flare-adapters/10-flare-to-o-ring-fitting-adapter.html You can also buy copper crush washers which go into the flare adapters to help with the seal if your flare ends aren't in pristine condition. COMPRESSOR AND BRACKET We will keep this simple. The old system compressors are much larger and heavier than modern rotary style compressors. Dont even bother with an old compressor. Buy a modern Sanden 508 compressor. You can buy genuine Sanden for $250 or a chinese knockoff for $130-$150. You will need a V belt model and these can be gotten from Ebay or http://nostalgicac.com/. Very important. The Compressors must be filed with oil. There are different types of oil and some oils are compatible with old style freon (R12) and some are compatible with new style freon (R134a). Since R12 can no longer be obtained you might as well plan on using R134a freon which mean Pag or Ester oil. Compressor uses 6oz of oil after you fully drain all the shipping oil from the unit. The bracket is easy. The Clardy system came with a bracket that fits the Sanden 508 compressor but also luckily a 2002faq member is now making an excellent bracket which can be bought from hobiedave. http://www.bmw2002faq.com/topic/82340-custom-made-ac-compressor-brackets-sold-out/?hl=hobiedave Blunttech now also sells a Sanden 508 bracket https://www.blunttech.com/shop/replacement-parts/climate-control/1448btkt CONDENSER The condenser is simply a matter of size. The bigger the better but you need to factor in how big can you fit into the nose of the 2002 and whether or not you are willing to cut the support bars to fit a larger condenser. A 9" x 12" condenser fits perfectly with no cutting however that is definitely considered on the small size. They make 10" x 18" condensers which might just fit without cutting but i have not tested this. You will need to decide how big you want to go here. You will need to mount this to the front of the nose, there are condenser mounting straps or you can zip tie it in depending on how much drilling and modifying you want to do. FAN You will need an electric fan on a relay kit to blow air through the condenser. The fan should be sized appropriately to fit into the nose of the 2002. I used a 10 inch fan which in my opinion fit perfectly. Don't forget to power the fan directly from the battery with a relay kit since it draws a lot of amps. HOSES AND DRYER People get scared by the plumbing of the AC system, but its actually very simple. There are standard AC hose sizes and certain sizes go between certain components. You will use #10, #8 and #6 size hose in your install. The #10 runs from the evaporator to the compressor. The #8 runs from the compressor to the Condenser. The #6 runs from the condenser to the dryer and then back to the evaporator. Ebay and http://nostalgicac.com/ sell "Hose Kits" which include the hoses, connections, safety switch and the dryer. Buy a universal kit and it should have everything you need! The safety switch measures freon pressure levels and cutoff the system if levels get too high or too low. It gets wired in series with the AC controls and compressor. To make your own AC lines you will need a crimper tool. I used this one and it worked great. I also used a substance called Nyloc with all my o ring fittings. Its a type of AC sealant and you coat the O rings in it before tightening and it helps to minimize any leaks. This stuff is option but recommended. Once everything is installed you will need to have the system charged with freon by a professional AC shop. But if everything goes to plan you will have good cold AC for under $1000. EDIT: If you wish to charge the system your self, you will need a proper 3 line gauge set ($35 on ebay) and a vacuum pump ($50 on ebay) Attach the low and high pressure lines to the AC system, attach vacuum pump to yellow line and start vacuuming. Open low pressure side valve on gauge and allow pressure to drop to -30psi. Vacuum for 30 minutes to remove moisture and air from system. Close low pressure valve and remove pump. Make sure system holds negative pressure for 30 minutes to ensure no leaks. Afterwards attach a can of Freon to yellow line. Start car and turn on AC to max. Open low pressure valve and let Freon into system. Low pressure should jump up to 60 psi but then the compressor should kick on and pressure will drop down to below 20. Note that the compressor pulley always spins but only when the clutch kicks in and the center part of the pulley is spinning is Freon being pumped! System will likely need 2 cans of R134a Freon (Maybe a little more. 3 cans is too much). We want low pressure of about 30-35 psi and high pressure around 250 on a nice day. (Pressures vary by day time temperatures). Remember to close the low pressure valve when switching Freon cans. Also the gauges pressures sometimes take a while to settle so add the 2 cans and then rev the motor up and let the system cycle a bit before deciding if pressures are right or if more is needed. A system with too much Freon will not cool! More is not better!
  11. Below is a period brochure for Behr A/C. I’m guessing it could date roughly to the introduction of Behr A/C, which I believe was in 1971 or 1972. My attempt to date the brochure was confounded by the conflicting messages presented by the ‘02 shown on pages one and two. Let’s ignore, for now, the obviously-airbrushed wood grain dash and steering wheel rim — both of which, admittedly, look cool with the wood shift knob! The odometer shows 17K miles, so it’s not a brand new, never-been-kissed example. It’s probably someone’s baby, with a few personalized modifications. The dash appears to be a two-piece version (April 1971 through August 1973). But the top piece appears to be Euro — neither fasten-seat-belts reminder nor labels surrounding the knobs — while the bottom piece appears to be U.S. — the shift pattern. Were these features airbrushed out or in? The heater slide control fascia dates to before the fan control moved down from the cluster to the slides (mid-to-September 1972). And the face of the slide control is chromed, which may be Euro, but is definitely not U.S. at this late date. There is no lower pad on the steering column, which may also be a Euro thing. The radio is a 1969 model Blaupunkt Frankfurt Stereo US, based on the “reversed FM” scale and the AM/FM buttons, as in the fifth and sixth photos: a 1969 example of this model, which was probably manufactured for a couple years. The driver’s seat is a Recaro S. Yes? The steering wheel is the U.S. version of the (faux) leather-rimmed sport wheel, based on its indented rather than perforated spokes. The instrumentation is U.S. So.... is this car just some airbrushed creation, or is it a U.S. version that had, somehow, already acquired a Euro dash. It probably doesn’t matter much. But if was a real car, and the dash was partly replaced, why? To be clear, in the 1970’s, I saw many ‘02’s that were too rusted to be registered, but I don’t recall cracking dashes during those years. Meanwhile the wood fascia trim, emulating earlier and more expensive BMW models, if well done, could look quite cool. I wanted to distribute this inspirational brochure while you still have some time under our sheltering-in-place guidance to add some wood trim to your own dashboard! 😉 Comments always welcome! Regards, Steve
  12. Selling the complete Behr air conditioning system originally installed in my 1973 2002tii. Removed and stored since the 80's. Fan works, but that's the only component I've checked. See photo for all the components. Asking $500/OBO plus shipping. Note that if you don't want the OEM compressor that would save about 30+ lbs in shipping (and on your car).


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