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InkaSam

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InkaSam last won the day on June 24

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  1. I needed a new headliner in my project car and after seeing how much work it was going to be, I decided I might as well personalise it a bit. Having been inspired by the use of tartan design fabric in Porsches and VWs I started a search for a suitable fabric for my Inka coloured 71. I was aware of the danger of using a dark fabric for headliner which would make the interior feel small and claustrophobic. This is the fabric that I settled on: It has the orange of the car and also a complementary light blue giving it a much lighter feel than many other tartan designs. I used polyester poplin but it doesn't have much stretch so I had some difficulty when I was pressing the headliner in to install the sun visors, a more stretchy fabric might work better or the headliner could be left a bit slack where the visors go in. So with the fabric chosen, these are the steps I followed to make the headliner and the parcel shelf. First lay out the old headliner and measure it. These are the measurements that I got from my old headliner Mark the centre of the board with the holes for the clips from the old headliner and then remove it from the headliner material as we need to reused it. Cut the new fabric to 1200mm x 1800mm Turn fabric over and with a pencil, don’t use pen or anything which may show through on the on the other side, mark a centre line length-wise. Starting from the back, leave 200mm and then draw a perpendicular line to the centre line. This will be where rod #5 will sit and we need to add 2 more lines to guide us in making the loop that this rod will go through. Draw 2 lines from the last line we did, one at 20mm and another at 40mm. The idea is that we will fold the material at the middle line and then sew along line 3 which should be sitting on line 1, this creates the pocket or loop that the rod will go into. Since the rods are bent at their ends, if the loops were left uncut all the way to the end of the material, then the headliner would bunch up and cause wrinkles so the loops need to be cut at the ends to relieve the fabric. I measured the cuts on my old headliner and then marked a little bit less on the new material to leave room for adjustment, you don’t want to cut too much, better to leave some of it uncut and adjust it once it is hanging up from the rod. The slanted lines are my cutting guide lines. From the last line for rod #5 measure 280mm and then repeat the process of drawing the 3 lines for rod #4. Repeat this process for all the other rods but note that the distance between rod #1 and #2 is different, it is 230mm instead of 280mm Once all the lines are drawn, start with rod #5 markings, fold the material along the middle line, pin the material to itself and then iron along the fold. This helped me sew along a straight line, which is important if the material has lines which make it easy to spot where things don’t match up. Before doing any sewing use some cut off pieces to adjust the tension and stitch length on your machine. Now sew along the visible line from the last step. I decided to sew a 2nd line 4-5mm to the right of the 1st one just for a bit more strength. Part of the loop is then cut out, taking care not to cut the stitching. Repeat the sewing for the other loops. We need to glue the board back onto the new fabric but I found this to be quite tricky because the board is actually bent when it gets installed. So from my old headliner, I cut out the piece after rod #5 and along the curve where the old headliner was folded over the board. I then used this as a template (draw mid line on the old headliner before cutting so that it can be lined up with the mid line of the new material) for where the new material should be glued to the board. Pin the template down and draw a line around it. Cut the fabric about 50mm away from the curved line that was drawn in the previous step. Apply glue to the board Line up the edge of the board with the curved line on the fabric, you will have bend the board a little. Then fold the end of the material over and press into to the glue. The headliner is ready to be installed, now is a good time to iron it to get any wrinkles out of it. Also put the screws into roof of the car for where the handles, sun-visors and quarter window hardware get attached. This saves hours of time later when trying to find the screw holes. Temporarily install the rods into the car, move them until they are in the top most position, mark this position in the roof with some masking tape, these marks will help during installation and ensure that each rod is in the correct position before we move on to the next one. Install the board which is now glued to the headliner, into the car using the metal clips. Insert rod #5 into its loop in the headliner and then put one end of the rod into its position in the roof and with the top of the rod closer to the back of the car, bend the rod a little bit until the other end can be put into position. Then pull the headliner to the front of the car until the loop reaches the masking tape mark. Check for wrinkles around where the rod bends down, if necessary cut a little bit of the loop to relieve the fabric, go slow. Repeat the above process for all the rods, the headliner is now hanging up and looking something like this. It is not fixed at the front yet so it looks floppy. Line up the centre line of the headliner with the centre line of the car, pull the headliner tight and add a clip. Work your way to the sides, pulling the material and adding clips one clip width apart. Once the front is clipped, start clipping the sides. Then fine tune the front further by pulling and adding a clip in between the clips which are there already. Glue some foam to the pillars and tuck it under the headliner. Some vinyl will cover this up later and the foam helps hide the wires that run underneath. I used 6mm because thats what I had handy, bit thicker might be better though. Once you’re happy with the way the headliner is sitting, start at the front windscreen, remove 5 or so clips, use a brush to apply some glue to the body, wait 1 min for the glue to get tacky and then press the headliner in. Repeat all around the car. Cut off excess fabric with a sharp knife. The headliner is glued in now, but there is still lots of details left to do. The vinyl on the pillars from my car were not in very good shape so I re did them, a heavy duty sewing machine would be handy for stitching the vinyl but a standard one will just manage a fold. I think it’s better to do the rear pillars with the same material as the headliner because doing it in the dark vinyl would probably create high contrast and might be distracting in the rear view mirror. I used some paper to create a template which was then transferred to the material With the headliner in, work starts on the parcel shelf. Use the old one as a template to cut out a new one from 4.8mm masonite. Using thicker masonite might be a good idea because my staples were denting the good side of the masonite. I got around this by adding foam underneath the vinyl to hide any imperfections. Trying out the fit for the new shelf with the speakers. Cut out enough vinyl so that the edges can be folded over underneath. I sewed in a bit of the headliner material to the vinyl to go in between the speakers. Cut reliefs in the vinyl where there is a curve in the shelf, add a layer of foam under the vinyl, apply glue to the edges and around the holes for the speakers. Fold the vinyl over and then staple with an air-powered staple gun (my manual stapler didn’t cut it). With a sharp knife carefully cut out the vinyl which is hiding the speaker holes. Install the parcel shelf into the car, screw in the speakers and install the grilles. All done, ready for windscreen installation!
  2. I needed a new headliner in my project car and after seeing how much work it was going to be, I decided I might as well personalise it a bit. Having been inspired by the use of tartan design fabric in Porsches and VWs I started a search for a suitable fabric for my Inka coloured 71. I was aware of the danger of using a dark fabric for headliner which would make the interior feel small and claustrophobic. This is the fabric that I settled on: It has the orange of the car and also a complementary light blue giving it a much lighter feel than many other tartan designs. I used polyester poplin but it doesn't have much stretch so I had some difficulty when I was pressing the headliner in to install the sun visors, a more stretchy fabric might work better or the headliner could be left a bit slack where the visors go in. So with the fabric chosen, these are the steps I followed to make the headliner and the parcel shelf. First lay out the old headliner and measure it. These are the measurements that I got from my old headliner Mark the centre of the board with the holes for the clips from the old headliner and then remove it from the headliner material as we need to reused it. Cut the new fabric to 1200mm x 1800mm Turn fabric over and with a pencil, don’t use pen or anything which may show through on the on the other side, mark a centre line length-wise. Starting from the back, leave 200mm and then draw a perpendicular line to the centre line. This will be where rod #5 will sit and we need to add 2 more lines to guide us in making the loop that this rod will go through. Draw 2 lines from the last line we did, one at 20mm and another at 40mm. The idea is that we will fold the material at the middle line and then sew along line 3 which should be sitting on line 1, this creates the pocket or loop that the rod will go into. Since the rods are bent at their ends, if the loops were left uncut all the way to the end of the material, then the headliner would bunch up and cause wrinkles so the loops need to be cut at the ends to relieve the fabric. I measured the cuts on my old headliner and then marked a little bit less on the new material to leave room for adjustment, you don’t want to cut too much, better to leave some of it uncut and adjust it once it is hanging up from the rod. The slanted lines are my cutting guide lines. From the last line for rod #5 measure 280mm and then repeat the process of drawing the 3 lines for rod #4. Repeat this process for all the other rods but note that the distance between rod #1 and #2 is different, it is 230mm instead of 280mm Once all the lines are drawn, start with rod #5 markings, fold the material along the middle line, pin the material to itself and then iron along the fold. This helped me sew along a straight line, which is important if the material has lines which make it easy to spot where things don’t match up. Before doing any sewing use some cut off pieces to adjust the tension and stitch length on your machine. Now sew along the visible line from the last step. I decided to sew a 2nd line 4-5mm to the right of the 1st one just for a bit more strength. Part of the loop is then cut out, taking care not to cut the stitching. Repeat the sewing for the other loops. We need to glue the board back onto the new fabric but I found this to be quite tricky because the board is actually bent when it gets installed. So from my old headliner, I cut out the piece after rod #5 and along the curve where the old headliner was folded over the board. I then used this as a template (draw mid line on the old headliner before cutting so that it can be lined up with the mid line of the new material) for where the new material should be glued to the board. Pin the template down and draw a line around it. Cut the fabric about 50mm away from the curved line that was drawn in the previous step. Apply glue to the board Line up the edge of the board with the curved line on the fabric, you will have bend the board a little. Then fold the end of the material over and press into to the glue. The headliner is ready to be installed, now is a good time to iron it to get any wrinkles out of it. Also put the screws into roof of the car for where the handles, sun-visors and quarter window hardware get attached. This saves hours of time later when trying to find the screw holes. Temporarily install the rods into the car, move them until they are in the top most position, mark this position in the roof with some masking tape, these marks will help during installation and ensure that each rod is in the correct position before we move on to the next one. Install the board which is now glued to the headliner, into the car using the metal clips. Insert rod #5 into its loop in the headliner and then put one end of the rod into its position in the roof and with the top of the rod closer to the back of the car, bend the rod a little bit until the other end can be put into position. Then pull the headliner to the front of the car until the loop reaches the masking tape mark. Check for wrinkles around where the rod bends down, if necessary cut a little bit of the loop to relieve the fabric, go slow. Repeat the above process for all the rods, the headliner is now hanging up and looking something like this. It is not fixed at the front yet so it looks floppy. Line up the centre line of the headliner with the centre line of the car, pull the headliner tight and add a clip. Work your way to the sides, pulling the material and adding clips one clip width apart. Once the front is clipped, start clipping the sides. Then fine tune the front further by pulling and adding a clip in between the clips which are there already. Glue some foam to the pillars and tuck it under the headliner. Some vinyl will cover this up later and the foam helps hide the wires that run underneath. I used 6mm because thats what I had handy, bit thicker might be better though. Once you’re happy with the way the headliner is sitting, start at the front windscreen, remove 5 or so clips, use a brush to apply some glue to the body, wait 1 min for the glue to get tacky and then press the headliner in. Repeat all around the car. Cut off excess fabric with a sharp knife. The headliner is glued in now, but there is still lots of details left to do. The vinyl on the pillars from my car were not in very good shape so I re did them, a heavy duty sewing machine would be handy for stitching the vinyl but a standard one will just manage a fold. I think it’s better to do the rear pillars with the same material as the headliner because doing it in the dark vinyl would probably create high contrast and might be distracting in the rear view mirror. I used some paper to create a template which was then transferred to the material With the headliner in, work starts on the parcel shelf. Use the old one as a template to cut out a new one from 4.8mm masonite. Using thicker masonite might be a good idea because my staples were denting the good side of the masonite. I got around this by adding foam underneath the vinyl to hide any imperfections. Trying out the fit for the new shelf with the speakers. Cut out enough vinyl so that the edges can be folded over underneath. I sewed in a bit of the headliner material to the vinyl to go in between the speakers. Cut reliefs in the vinyl where there is a curve in the shelf, add a layer of foam under the vinyl, apply glue to the edges and around the holes for the speakers. Fold the vinyl over and then staple with an air-powered staple gun (my manual stapler didn’t cut it). With a sharp knife carefully cut out the vinyl which is hiding the speaker holes. Install the parcel shelf into the car, screw in the speakers and install the grilles. All done, ready for windscreen installation! View full article
  3. Hi @oldbimmers, the height of each loop is 20mm so an extra 40mm of material is needed to make each loop.
  4. Thanks for all the positive comments everyone! I might write a technical article while it's still fresh in mind as I edited a few things out to keep the post short.
  5. Thanks Steve! Yes I know the tartan design is not everyone's taste but I actually like it! (i'll probably be banished to the VW forum! ) 😄
  6. Hi all, The headliner on the car that I am putting together was not useable and the one in the donor car was just as crackly so I decided to have a go at making my own. I just wanted to share what I did which might help other people going down this road. Here is the plan I made by measuring the original headliner, measurements in mm. This is what the original headliner looked like with all the mold. 🤢 This is the material that I went with. It is polyester poplin, it's nice and tough but in hindsight it has very little stretch which made it hard later when installing the sun visors. Marking the back of the fabric where the loops are and about how much to cut for the bends in the rod so the headliner doesn't bunch up. I based everything on a centre line in the fabric so I could adjust things and then cut off any excess from edges at the end. Polyester upholstery thread was used in the machine, because of the lines in the fabric it is easy to see if the sewing is not done straight so I ironed the fabric first to guide me. Once all the loops were sewn up I glued the board (which clips in next to the rear windscreen) to the new headliner. Starting from the back I clipped the board in and inserted the rods one at a time, trimming the loops where necessary and finally using the little foldback clips you can see in the picture below to hold the front in position then moving on to pulling the headliner from the sides and clipping it. One thing I should have done before putting the headliner on would have been to put the screws in for where the sun-visor, sun-visor clips and the handles go, this would have saved me lot of headaches later even though I had marked on the outside of the car where these needed to go. This contact adhesive that I got from the upholstery shop is great, once I was happy with how the headliner was sitting I took 5 or so clips off brushed this stuff on both the body and the fabric and waited 1 minute or so for it to get tacky and then pressed them together Headliner with all the clips off: I had some vinyl left over so I redid the old material on the pillars too: The material on the rear pillars were done separately to the headliner, initially I was thinking to do them in vinyl but I think it is better with the matching headliner material. Onto replacing the parcel shelf: About to cut the vinyl for the shelf: I used 4.8mm masonite for the parcel shelf and the shortest staples that I had were 6mm, I found that the staples didn't poke through but dented the masonite and these dents were visible once the vinyl was stretched tight. So I used 6mm foam underneath the vinyl to pad it out bit. 6 x 9 speakers in: Backseat in too:
  7. The chrome work around the outside really helps bring out the personality of the car, the grille being the centre piece. The T-bolts holding the chrome pieces at the end points were so rusted that they were no longer usable so I had to make them up by welding little bolts to pieces of drilled metal plates. There are also 2 hooks on the side of the grilles next to the headlights which pull the grille flush, one of these was missing and the other was broken so more fabrication. The spares car is a 74 model so I couldn't raid that for these parts, looking at the parts in the different year models I came to the conclusion that for the later year models they've done things to make assembling the cars quicker but not necessarily making them stronger and longer lasting. Then I started on the doors which actually have a fair fews things on them which need to be adjusted properly. Up to now I've had this big box of all the window winder pieces, locks, door handles and quarter windows sitting in the corner of the garage and finally I've got to the stage of looking at all these pieces and trying to make some sense out of them. The previous owner of the car took it apart to restore it and that's how I got it 12 years ago and now it's all coming back together, I'm so thankful of the PO who sold me the parts car as well, so I have not only spares but also a reference to work with. This was invaluable with the doors because there is a lot going on. I started with the passenger door, mounted everything on it before mounting it on the hinges, but for the second one I put the empty door on the hinges first and then added things as that made it easier to first adjust the position of the door before all the other things go in. The window winder mechanism has a lot of adjustment points and took some fiddling to get the window to go up smoothly and stop at the right height, I should've read all the books before I started but eventually I got the passenger-side door closing and the window winder working. Thinking now that I'd done one, the second one should be easier but it wasn't to be. After mounting the driver door it became clear that no matter how I adjusted the door hinges, the door would not open properly because its edge would collide with the edge of front side panel. I was getting so frustrated that I was considering sanding down the edges of the front panel, luckily I didn't do that as I noticed that the edges were folded over and sanding them would open them up. I had a closer look at the passenger door and noticed that the door was about 1-2mm in from where the front side panel was and this allowed it to slip past the edge as the door was opened. Somehow the driver door hinge mounts had deformed over the years and the door was flush with the side panel and as soon as I tried opening it, it would collide with the side panel and not open. First thing I tried was undoing the bolts for the side panel to see if I could make it sit a mm or two out, but there didn't seem to be anyway to adjust things there so the next idea was to insert some shims between the hinges and the door mounts which would make the door sit in a bit. I used 3mm pieces of aluminium with holes drilled for the mounting bolts. This worked great and the door opened and closed properly but not before I had chipped a fair bit of the paint off the various edges and corners, so out came the brush and the touch up paint. I missing one of the door mouldings so I have to see if I can buy one locally, or I might have to go with the stick-on stuff, wonder how noticeable it would be to have different body moulding on the two sides of the car? There are still lots of things to do on the car but they are getting held up by the headlining. The headlining was unusable out of both cars so I am going down the path of making my own one! The material has been ordered but has been delayed because of all the lockdowns, might be a good time to get the sewing machine working.
  8. Some of the tasks that I thought would be easy bolt-on tasks turned out to be much more involved than I thought. The bumpers being one of them. I found that all the t bolts holding the rubber to the chrome bumper were all rusted and they would almost fall off at the sight of my spanner, of course it's really hard to find these special T-bolts where I am so I decided to make them by welding threaded rod to a cut off end of a electrical half saddle which is used for holding 20mm conduit. It was just the right size so it saved me some cutting and also had the hole drilled as a bonus. Only issue was that they were zinc-plated so I put them in a tub of muriatic acid for a few hours before starting to tig weld them. Unfortunately I didn't take any photos of the process as happens often when I get lost in a task but I managed to make 30 of the little things, just enough for doing the front and back bumper bars. The bonnet adjustment was also hours of fun! Luckily I have a spares car which I can refer to when I don't know how things go back together but I still managed to put the spring in the wrong way the first time so it actually made opening the bonnet more difficult! The trick was to mount the spring to the bonnet with the legs pointing down, when the bonnet is closed the spring needs to be under tension. The bonnet adjustments are better done with the spring supports loose as the they seem to add another variable to the already complicated mix. I had to fiddle around with it a fair bit but I think it might be best to first adjust the height of the bonnet at the front with bonnet closed, by moving the brackets at the front of the car up or down. Once the height looks even from side to side, tighten the brackets and move on the adjusting the side of the brackets which bolt to the bonnet. For this I measured the clearance of the corners of the bonnet to the base of the windscreen pillars, I adjusted the brackets until the clearance on both sides was about the same about 10mm. The final step would be to tighten the spring supports so the clearances are still good when the bonnet is locked. Here is a shot with the bonnet on and the bumper waiting to get on. Notice that I have the bumper bar supports the wrong way, it looked really funny when I went to put the bumper bar on and found that it was pointing down! The bumper bar was a pain to put on, there is probably a method to it which I don't know but I made a mental note to myself to leave the easy to reach bolts loose to the end, tightening the hard to reach bolts last means there is little play which makes the whole task more difficult. Here is the front bumper finally mounted. The hardest part with the back bumper was replacing all the rusted t-bolts in the black rubber moulding and then surprisingly the number plate light just didn't want to be woken up from their rusty slumber! Next up will be to put some of the body chrome back on and then make a start on the doors.
  9. After 12 years of the engine being dormant, I was so surprised to hear the familiar sound of the M10 engine again! Starting your first rebuilt engine is one of those one off feelings! I wasn't sure if it would work because of the poor state of the pistons although the engine still has a bit of a hiccup which I am not sure what is causing it, I tried a different distributor but it's still there. The car is not registered so I haven't taken it out of the driveway so I'm not sure how the engine will perform under some load but for now I am happy that it is running. Thanks to Covid-19 I have a lot of time to work on the other parts of the car each of which seems to expand into a big job when I get into it.
  10. Having a 121 head, I've had a hard time finding suitable pistons for my matching number engine. So I decided to use the engine out of the spares car to practice on while I search for pistons. The bearings wore pretty bad on the practice engine and the oil pump chain was too loose, the ring lands were way out of spec so I am just going to replace the bearings, new oil pump chain and put the old pistons back in and see if it will run. I lifted the car body off the subframe using a chain block and a heavy duty rack shelf, and then pulling the the subframe out using an ATV lift: Hooking up the gearbox to the engine: With the engine mounted onto the subframe, I strapped everything down to the ATV lift with an extra trolley bearing the weight of the gearbox, I slipped it all into position:
  11. I'm about to do mine from the bottom, I will pull the body up from the top using a chain block supported by heavy duty shelving racks and a beam underneath the car. Here is a shot with the subframe out:
  12. Thanks Hans, yes I did remember to give the timing cover to the machine shop with the head and they did them together. Here in Australia we have 98 fuel which seems to be equivalent to 93 in the states. I'm basing my estimates on each 0.5mm of shaved head giving an extra 0.5 of compression (i think this is from the maccartney book). Based on this I think 9.3 bathtubs would be pushed to 10.8 CR in my case which I think would be problematic. Yes I do find myself being directed back to that page, lots of good information there.
  13. Thanks for the insights Toby, always much appreciated. I wonder if I can use the Toyota 20R pistons. The original 121 with flattop pistons got 8.5:1 CR, my head is shaved 1.6mm, the 20R pistons have pin height of 1.625 (41.275mm), standard 2002 flattops had pin height 1.665 (42.291mm) so 0.04 difference (~1mm). Would I be correct that the amount shaved off the head compensates for the short pin height of the 20R and then some, so I might get CR in the high 8s?
  14. I've got my 121 head back from the machine shop and I'm getting an average of 127.9mm (5.0354331 inches) when measuring the head height at the corners. For the deck height, i'm getting about 217.77 mm (8.573622 inches) although this may be a bit over the actual value because of the thickness of the calliper jaws (I didn't want to use the sharp upper jaws as they scratch things very easily). So if the original deck height from the factory is meant to be 217.2mm then my block has not been decked. The cylinder bores measured between 89.015 --> 89.087 so I would be looking to rebore to 89.25 mm if I can get the correct pistons. This will be a standard street car, just want something reliable and convenient to drive on the weekends. With the head having been machined so much (workshop manual recommending only going to 128.5mm, although Macartney says you can take off 1.5mm when trying to raise compression), I am wondering: 1. what my options are in terms of pistons, only flat-tops? or bathtubs too (would compression get too high? I want to keep it to 9.5 max, happy to go lower. Would the bathtubs be getting close to hitting the valves? If so I wont even bother searching for them) 2. do I need to use an adjustable timing sprocket to compensate for the change in timing because of the head height? Thanks, Sam
  15. Does it happen when pressing the brake pedal?
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