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Vintageblau.com

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  1. Thank you for the input. W&N it is. Do most people butt-weld (sp?) them in or overlap the seams?
  2. Hello, the 1970 stereo model has been completely gone through and works like new on the FM band, receiving an abundance of stations with strong output and clear sound. We did not bother spending a lot of time on the AM. This radio is currently being listed at $750 with an excellent, faceplate, levers as well as BMW 2002 specific knobs. This is one of the hardest radio models to find and they do not show up very often.
  3. Hi, I'm on the East Coast in NY. Who makes the best body panels (actually floor pans) ? Actually doesn't matter if they are international or not. I just want an excellent fit, thick gauge metal. I remember when I used to work with early VW's and the replacement panels were thin, vaguely stamped horrible parts. I hope to find a supplier for my 1975 2002 who can do better than that. Thank you. Ingo Prangenberg Vintageblau.com
  4. Sure, here it is. They are in their original boxes. Here is one lined up to an NOS center console face-plate that we are currently selling on Ebay. The speaker as an NOS item is available at $139.
  5. I'm often asked about the proper wiring for the typical Blaupunkt radio in the early BMW models and am including a diagram showing the proper locations for all electrical wiring. Earlier and later radios have a slightly different configuration. If anyone has specific question please contact me through PM or through our website: Vintageblau.com I'm often asked about the proper wiring for the typical Blaupunkt radio in the early BMW models and am including a diagram showing the proper locations for all electrical wiring. Earlier and later radios have a slightly different configuration. If anyone has specific questions please contact me through PM or through our website: Vintageblau.com The wiring process for a vintage Blaupunkt radio is generally a simple procedure. Besides the antenna wire and speaker cables, the only other wires are the positive and negative wires, possibly an automatic antenna cable if it applies to your vehicle model. Where these wires attach to Blaupunkt radios changed over the years though. No matter what model vintage radio you install, it is important to ground it properly in order to ensure its proper function. Bad grounding will result in sub par performance and a lack of reception. For the typical 1970's models the rear tab (as shown in the image below as #2) is designated for attaching the ground wire. The positive (hot) wire should be attached at the +12V tab and an inline fuse is highly recommended as well. Speakers: The 1970's Blaupunkt radio shown in the diagram is a mono Porsche 911 Frankfurt unit. The two speaker holes (as shown in the diagram as #7) take typical banana/push plugs. We recommend using our original speaker plugs for correct fitment. These mono output radios are designed to run either one or two speakers. Speakers should be 8 ohm through the late 1970's. Using 4 ohm speakers will damage the radio over time. Speaker wattage should be kept relatively low and factory specs are always best. For those customers requiring a more powerful system, an amplifier can be installed, allowing for more powerful speaker installation. If you have any questions regarding the specifics for your radio application, just let us know. We are always happy to help. The speaker plugs for a vintage Blaupunkt radio can be one of two versions. The version with two equal round pins were used throughout the 50's, 60's and early 1970's. About 1974 these were changed to the "pin and spade" type that only allow you to insert the plug one way, thus specifying positive and negative output. Mono radios use one plug, while stereo units require two. Most Blaupunkt radios beginning about 1965 have an input port commonly referred to as the "DIN input". These input ports allow for external devises such as an external tape player, external short wave receiver or an external traffic decoder to easily be plugged into your vehicles stereo system. While a chrome front shortwave receiver or original equipment external tape may have a decorative quality as an optional accessory to the dash of a vintage car, they generally aren't very useful these days. The good news is that this port can be used for modern external devices as well such as MP3 players, iPod's, tablets and cell-phones. This allows you to listen to music from your external device through your vintage cars vintage stereo system. Just pull out the rear white cap and plug in the external device cable. Then plug in the small male end into your cell-phones headphone jack, you can now listen to your stored music. The cables we sell never have to be unplugged from the back of the radios and can stay in place permanently. Other companies only provide cables that have to be unplugged from the rear of the radio when not in use, which is seriously inconvenient. We also have our cables custom made with superior materials in regards to the plugs and wiring. For further information, restored radios and radio parts please contact us: Vintageblau.com View full article
  6. I'm often asked about the proper wiring for the typical Blaupunkt radio in the early BMW models and am including a diagram showing the proper locations for all electrical wiring. Earlier and later radios have a slightly different configuration. If anyone has specific questions please contact me through PM or through our website: Vintageblau.com The wiring process for a vintage Blaupunkt radio is generally a simple procedure. Besides the antenna wire and speaker cables, the only other wires are the positive and negative wires, possibly an automatic antenna cable if it applies to your vehicle model. Where these wires attach to Blaupunkt radios changed over the years though. No matter what model vintage radio you install, it is important to ground it properly in order to ensure its proper function. Bad grounding will result in sub par performance and a lack of reception. For the typical 1970's models the rear tab (as shown in the image below as #2) is designated for attaching the ground wire. The positive (hot) wire should be attached at the +12V tab and an inline fuse is highly recommended as well. Speakers: The 1970's Blaupunkt radio shown in the diagram is a mono Porsche 911 Frankfurt unit. The two speaker holes (as shown in the diagram as #7) take typical banana/push plugs. We recommend using our original speaker plugs for correct fitment. These mono output radios are designed to run either one or two speakers. Speakers should be 8 ohm through the late 1970's. Using 4 ohm speakers will damage the radio over time. Speaker wattage should be kept relatively low and factory specs are always best. For those customers requiring a more powerful system, an amplifier can be installed, allowing for more powerful speaker installation. If you have any questions regarding the specifics for your radio application, just let us know. We are always happy to help. The speaker plugs for a vintage Blaupunkt radio can be one of two versions. The version with two equal round pins were used throughout the 50's, 60's and early 1970's. About 1974 these were changed to the "pin and spade" type that only allow you to insert the plug one way, thus specifying positive and negative output. Mono radios use one plug, while stereo units require two. Most Blaupunkt radios beginning about 1965 have an input port commonly referred to as the "DIN input". These input ports allow for external devises such as an external tape player, external short wave receiver or an external traffic decoder to easily be plugged into your vehicles stereo system. While a chrome front shortwave receiver or original equipment external tape may have a decorative quality as an optional accessory to the dash of a vintage car, they generally aren't very useful these days. The good news is that this port can be used for modern external devices as well such as MP3 players, iPod's, tablets and cell-phones. This allows you to listen to music from your external device through your vintage cars vintage stereo system. Just pull out the rear white cap and plug in the external device cable. Then plug in the small male end into your cell-phones headphone jack, you can now listen to your stored music. The cables we sell never have to be unplugged from the back of the radios and can stay in place permanently. Other companies only provide cables that have to be unplugged from the rear of the radio when not in use, which is seriously inconvenient. We also have our cables custom made with superior materials in regards to the plugs and wiring. For further information, restored radios and radio parts please contact us: Vintageblau.com
  7. Just a couple of images of newly restored US models available. These are mid and late 1960's models. We do have 1970's models available as well as mono and stereo units. We just got a small batch of NOS BMW speakers in as well for the center console.
  8. I really appreciate the responses. Thank you very much. Amazing that the dealership can still locate parts these days!
  9. Hello all, I just took my rear brake drums off and the brake shoe adjusters,besides being frozen solid, the heads are completely stripped. I would like to replace them, but cannot see a way of removing them. Has anyone done this? And does anyone know where to buy these adjusters? Thanks, Ingo Prangenberg Vintageblau.com
  10. Please go ahead and contact me through our email address for specific questions or part inquiries: [email protected] Thanks, Ingo Prangenberg
  11. Your right, much better now! Ingo Prangenberg Vintageblau.com
  12. Three days ago I had my '76 2002 (not Tii) delivered. Parked for 7.5 years. I cranked the engine over by hand to make sure the valves were not stuck. I checked the oil level. I put a little gas down the carb and cranked the car over 10 seconds at a time in order to not overheat/stress the starter. After 3-4 attempts the darn thing actually started and even idled. I ran her for one minute checking oil pressure lights. I can't believe she ran great. I thought the gas would be varnish. Now I will siphon the old gas, do an oil change and check the points. I think the car was "grateful" for having been saved! I do not think this was "normal" and would not advise it either. I'm just delighted it worked. The battery even ended up holding a charge. I got into the car the next morning and she started right up. Bizarre.


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