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Pramono

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  1. If the U bracket broke at the surface of the A pillar surface, therefore the left over piece is still intact behind the A pillar. the U bracket is spot welded. That is what the offset if for, to provide clearance for the left over piece. If the existing U bracket is completely undone, the supporting bracket will still do the purpose as reinforcement for the mounting bracket.
  2. I have tried this and it works with original or updated door check. I have not have experienced it with FAQ design, but as long as the FAQ design is compatible with OEM, then it should works.
  3. How many of you out there have experienced a bent door panel or dinged up door moulding because the door doesn't stop when opened? Another annoying thing is the loud popping noise when you try closing the door after. Many of you have most likely experienced this, which is caused by a broken door check/stopper or the U-bracket at the A-pillar. However, the door check/stopper can be easily replaced - The part is still available, but the U-shaped bracket is another story. It's not easy to repair, because that bracket is welded on the inside of the A-pillar, reinforced from inside during assembly. If you try to weld a U-bracket at the surface of the pillar, it won't be strong enough; you would only be welding it to the sheetmetal. Welding it properly is an expensive process: You must remove the door weatherstrip and carpeting if you don't want to burn them, as well as requiring spot painting after. I've thought about how to repair the broken bracket and came up with a bracket design using a reinforcement plate from inside. This design makes it easy to install and is very strong. A zinc-plated bracket is mounted on the outside of where the old bracket is, and a reinforcement plate is installed with a special holder/rod through an access hole from the interior's kick panel. You won't need to cut any additional holes - There is a factory oval cutout about 2 inches by 3 inches. Left side bracket repair set shown; comes with: Reinforcement plate with mounting rod & studs, U-bracket, guide pin & 2x 6mm nuts. Available for both sides. INSTRUCTIONS To start with the installation, mock up the outer U-bracket piece as best as you can with the old holes where the door brake bracket used to be. Use a punch to find the center of the mounting holes; from there, use a drill bit that is big enough to fit a 6mm stud. Move to the inside kick panel and begin lifting the carpet away - You should be able to see an oval hole that will give you access to the sheet metal at the bracket mount. Guide the reinforcement plate with the rod holder through the access hole and mount the plate through drilled holes. The reinforcement plate has two mounted 6mm studs. The rod has a unique angle that will make it simple to install the plate. Guide the studs through the pre-drilled holes; once the stud is visible, slide the U-bracket through the studs and install & tighten both nuts. Leave the rod holder intact for now. Connect the door check/stopped to the U-bracket and secure it with the supplied pin and C-clip. After testing the door operation and everything looks well, you can remove the holder rod by twisting & rocking it back and forth. Undo the C-clip, remove the pin and any broken pieces. You should be left with two rectangular holes where the old bracket used to be. Align the bracket with where it should sit, and then mark the two holes where the studs will go through. You will need to drill out these holes to accept a 6mm stud, each. Next, pull back on the interior kick panel carpeting and begin to wiggle the reinforcement plate up and through the holes. Be sure not to separate the rod until the plate has been secured and door operation has been checked. Mate the U-shaped bracket through the studs and install the provided nuts. Align the door brake rod between the U-bracket and slide the pin through. Applying some grease on the pin would help the door stopper rotate more freely. Lastly, secure the pin by installing the C-clip at the bottom. You're done! The whole process/job will take about 30-45 minutes each side. No welding; just drilling two holes for mounting. Now there will be no more popping noise or damaged door panels and/or moldings. You can paint these in body color prior to installment. These repair kits will be available soon and will either come in sets or for individual doors (left or right). You can contact me through my email at [email protected] if you are interested. Thanks again folks for taking the time to read this, and hope this will be something that will help give you that extra peace of mind for your '02! How it breaks The original bracket was made using a stamping method, bent into the shape it needs to be and then spot welded onto the body's sheet metal. Over time, as the door is opened & closed (as well as other factors, such as exposure to the weather), the joint has become weak over 40+ years, causing the welds to crack and eventually separate/break from the sheet metal. The constant pushing & pulling of the door brake and its detents certainly don't help as well. The reason that our reinforcing plate is indented is because sometimes the old bracket may not break off cleanly. View full article
  4. How many of you out there have experienced a bent door panel or dinged up door moulding because the door doesn't stop when opened? Another annoying thing is the loud popping noise when you try closing the door after. Many of you have most likely experienced this, which is caused by a broken door check/stopper or the U-bracket at the A-pillar. However, the door check/stopper can be easily replaced - The part is still available, but the U-shaped bracket is another story. It's not easy to repair, because that bracket is welded on the inside of the A-pillar, reinforced from inside during assembly. If you try to weld a U-bracket at the surface of the pillar, it won't be strong enough; you would only be welding it to the sheetmetal. Welding it properly is an expensive process: You must remove the door weatherstrip and carpeting if you don't want to burn them, as well as requiring spot painting after. I've thought about how to repair the broken bracket and came up with a bracket design using a reinforcement plate from inside. This design makes it easy to install and is very strong. A zinc-plated bracket is mounted on the outside of where the old bracket is, and a reinforcement plate is installed with a special holder/rod through an access hole from the interior's kick panel. You won't need to cut any additional holes - There is a factory oval cutout about 2 inches by 3 inches. Left side bracket repair set shown; comes with: Reinforcement plate with mounting rod & studs, U-bracket, guide pin & 2x 6mm nuts. Available for both sides. INSTRUCTIONS To start with the installation, mock up the outer U-bracket piece as best as you can with the old holes where the door brake bracket used to be. Use a punch to find the center of the mounting holes; from there, use a drill bit that is big enough to fit a 6mm stud. Move to the inside kick panel and begin lifting the carpet away - You should be able to see an oval hole that will give you access to the sheet metal at the bracket mount. Guide the reinforcement plate with the rod holder through the access hole and mount the plate through drilled holes. The reinforcement plate has two mounted 6mm studs. The rod has a unique angle that will make it simple to install the plate. Guide the studs through the pre-drilled holes; once the stud is visible, slide the U-bracket through the studs and install & tighten both nuts. Leave the rod holder intact for now. Connect the door check/stopped to the U-bracket and secure it with the supplied pin and C-clip. After testing the door operation and everything looks well, you can remove the holder rod by twisting & rocking it back and forth. Undo the C-clip, remove the pin and any broken pieces. You should be left with two rectangular holes where the old bracket used to be. Align the bracket with where it should sit, and then mark the two holes where the studs will go through. You will need to drill out these holes to accept a 6mm stud, each. Next, pull back on the interior kick panel carpeting and begin to wiggle the reinforcement plate up and through the holes. Be sure not to separate the rod until the plate has been secured and door operation has been checked. Mate the U-shaped bracket through the studs and install the provided nuts. Align the door brake rod between the U-bracket and slide the pin through. Applying some grease on the pin would help the door stopper rotate more freely. Lastly, secure the pin by installing the C-clip at the bottom. You're done! The whole process/job will take about 30-45 minutes each side. No welding; just drilling two holes for mounting. Now there will be no more popping noise or damaged door panels and/or moldings. You can paint these in body color prior to installment. These repair kits will be available soon and will either come in sets or for individual doors (left or right). You can contact me through my email at [email protected] if you are interested. Thanks again folks for taking the time to read this, and hope this will be something that will help give you that extra peace of mind for your '02! How it breaks The original bracket was made using a stamping method, bent into the shape it needs to be and then spot welded onto the body's sheet metal. Over time, as the door is opened & closed (as well as other factors, such as exposure to the weather), the joint has become weak over 40+ years, causing the welds to crack and eventually separate/break from the sheet metal. The constant pushing & pulling of the door brake and its detents certainly don't help as well. The reason that our reinforcing plate is indented is because sometimes the old bracket may not break off cleanly.
  5. Have you found your '02 yet. I have 73 Driver. A few rust spot (Ft windshield, Spare tire well and rear left floor), the rust are not to bad, otherwise the rest of the body is great and straight. All body gaps are even. Just had a recent valve job , and e few additional things. If interested let me know, Btw, it Malaga with Recaro front seats and Nardi wheel. 4Speed.
  6. Do you still have the heater box assembly with brackets and wiring harness? Please PM me for more information. Thanks.
  7. Rich, if you still want to sell them, send me your pay pal.
  8. If you have the metal clamps that hold the cables down (2x for the heat & defrost, 1x for the heater valve/fresh air flap), then I'll consider it at that price. Thanks, - H
  9. Shipping would be to 94102; would you take an offer of $40, plus paypal fee and shipping? Thanks, - H
  10. I'm interested. Will you be at Bay Area '02? We can arrange for an exchange there. Thanks.
  11. How to Reuse Heater Motor Metal Fan Blades The replacement heater blower motor is no longer available as a complete assembly; only the blower motor itself. Many of us would like to keep the original metal or aluminum fan blade, but it’s almost impossible to remove the fan blade from the old/seized motor without destroying the pressed in the plastic bushing that the fan sits between. By this decade, any of these bushings have also become brittle and separated. If you have a very early metal blade that came with the set screw, then you may be able to transfer and reuse the blade if the set screw is not rusted out. PRDesignSF has been proud to offer you the plastic fan blade that adapts to the new motor. Since there is a lot less weight for the motor to turn, it puts less stress on the motor, allowing it to last longer while providing almost the same airflow. For those who would like to save and reuse the metal/aluminum blades, we have created an adapter screw from stainless steel that will work. Now you will be able to reuse the metal blade and make it look more original. Here's a quick guide to removing the blade safely without destroying it. The one thing that you do not want to do is attempt to yank the blade off the shaft; you will damage the blade. The metal shaft needs to be cut off and press out. You could reuse the plastic bushing if they are still in good condition, or if you do not want to take a chance for the bushing to become separated in the future, you can use the new adapter screw that we made. With the motor out, separate the plastic body housing by prying the tabs and they will split up. Remove the press-in clip at the end of the shaft and cut the upper support arm bearing housing. This is to create some space for you to be able to cut the shaft. Now you can pull the internal parts out, including the stator, from the housing. There is a square clip at the back of the bearing support arms; pry it with a screwdriver and the support arm will become loose, but still attached to the shaft. It’s seated in a spherical race. You should be able to move it around to create enough space to cut the shaft now. With the shaft cut off, turn the fan upside down and support it with a 14mm deep socket. Now, you can use a punch to drift the shaft out. The bushing will be separated and the fan will be free. The plastic bushing consists of two separate parts, the top half features a built-in key to lock the blade, and the bottom half to keep the upper bushing from coming off the blade by pressing into it. You can clean up the blade, but be very gentle with an aluminum blade: It’s very easy to deform the blade. The adapter screw is very easy to install. Twist the adapter through the fan center hole and tighten it with the nylock nut. Use an 8mm Allen and 14mm socket to tighten the adapter screw. Tightened to 16-18 Ft-Lb. Mark approximately 5 mm from the upper fan body to the shaft; too far out and the fan will interfere with the fresh air flap. You can also tell if you’ve put the fan at the right depth if you have the chamfered edge slightly sticking out from the adapter. Tighten the set screw using a 2mm Allen into the shaft. Because the set screw is cupped, it will bite into the shaft and secure it. Be sure to use thread locker (medium strength) on the set screw to prevent it from backing out. You could also apply a dab of paint on the top of the set screw to provide additional protection from backing out. Optionally (Recommended), you can also cut a divot into the shaft to provide a flat area for the set screw to sit in; it’s still a good idea to apply thread locker onto the set screw. To test proper blade orientation, power up the motor (Male -, Female +). When the blades are facing you, they should be turning counter-clockwise. If you feel a lot of vibration (Light vibration is acceptable), then most likely the blades were not straight. Looking from the side of the motor, check if all the blade’s center ridges are 90 degrees (perpendicular) to the shaft motor, otherwise, they are out of balance. With this, now you have the option of reusing your metal/aluminum blade or plastic blade. Either metal (Used) or plastic fan blades can be purchased from our store as well. Contact us at www.PRDesignsf.com or email [email protected] Happy ’02 motoring! View full article
  12. How to Reuse Heater Motor Metal Fan Blades The replacement heater blower motor is no longer available as a complete assembly; only the blower motor itself. Many of us would like to keep the original metal or aluminum fan blade, but it’s almost impossible to remove the fan blade from the old/seized motor without destroying the pressed in the plastic bushing that the fan sits between. By this decade, any of these bushings have also become brittle and separated. If you have a very early metal blade that came with the set screw, then you may be able to transfer and reuse the blade if the set screw is not rusted out. PRDesignSF has been proud to offer you the plastic fan blade that adapts to the new motor. Since there is a lot less weight for the motor to turn, it puts less stress on the motor, allowing it to last longer while providing almost the same airflow. For those who would like to save and reuse the metal/aluminum blades, we have created an adapter screw from stainless steel that will work. Now you will be able to reuse the metal blade and make it look more original. Here's a quick guide to removing the blade safely without destroying it. The one thing that you do not want to do is attempt to yank the blade off the shaft; you will damage the blade. The metal shaft needs to be cut off and press out. You could reuse the plastic bushing if they are still in good condition, or if you do not want to take a chance for the bushing to become separated in the future, you can use the new adapter screw that we made. With the motor out, separate the plastic body housing by prying the tabs and they will split up. Remove the press-in clip at the end of the shaft and cut the upper support arm bearing housing. This is to create some space for you to be able to cut the shaft. Now you can pull the internal parts out, including the stator, from the housing. There is a square clip at the back of the bearing support arms; pry it with a screwdriver and the support arm will become loose, but still attached to the shaft. It’s seated in a spherical race. You should be able to move it around to create enough space to cut the shaft now. With the shaft cut off, turn the fan upside down and support it with a 14mm deep socket. Now, you can use a punch to drift the shaft out. The bushing will be separated and the fan will be free. The plastic bushing consists of two separate parts, the top half features a built-in key to lock the blade, and the bottom half to keep the upper bushing from coming off the blade by pressing into it. You can clean up the blade, but be very gentle with an aluminum blade: It’s very easy to deform the blade. The adapter screw is very easy to install. Twist the adapter through the fan center hole and tighten it with the nylock nut. Use an 8mm Allen and 14mm socket to tighten the adapter screw. Tightened to 16-18 Ft-Lb. Mark approximately 5 mm from the upper fan body to the shaft; too far out and the fan will interfere with the fresh air flap. You can also tell if you’ve put the fan at the right depth if you have the chamfered edge slightly sticking out from the adapter. Tighten the set screw using a 2mm Allen into the shaft. Because the set screw is cupped, it will bite into the shaft and secure it. Be sure to use thread locker (medium strength) on the set screw to prevent it from backing out. You could also apply a dab of paint on the top of the set screw to provide additional protection from backing out. Optionally (Recommended), you can also cut a divot into the shaft to provide a flat area for the set screw to sit in; it’s still a good idea to apply thread locker onto the set screw. To test proper blade orientation, power up the motor (Male -, Female +). When the blades are facing you, they should be turning counter-clockwise. If you feel a lot of vibration (Light vibration is acceptable), then most likely the blades were not straight. Looking from the side of the motor, check if all the blade’s center ridges are 90 degrees (perpendicular) to the shaft motor, otherwise, they are out of balance. With this, now you have the option of reusing your metal/aluminum blade or plastic blade. Either metal (Used) or plastic fan blades can be purchased from our store as well. Contact us at www.PRDesignsf.com or email [email protected] Happy ’02 motoring!
  13. That is wonderfull, im glad that you able to reproduce the cables. How about the double bowden cable, if the dia to big, it may not be able to go through the valve lever pinch bolt.
  14. I don't use nylon lock. With 15/64 shaft core, its gonna be pretty tight fit. You can add a drop of glue to secure it, but even without the glue, I don't think it's going anywhere. It hardly have any weight to go against any centrifugal force.
  15. I have checked the physical property of the fan blades, It's made of Polycarbonate. It can withstand up to 124 Deg Celcius (Deflection temp under load), Heat resistance up to 136 Deg Cel, and a melting point of 280-320 Deg Cel. I don't have the breakage freezing temperatures info. Weight is 1 oz. Hope it answer some questions.
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