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duckdudess

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  1. Giving a nod to the 70’s Volkswagen repair manual that spawned countless others, my post is a distillation of several other posts on how to construct half shafts that work with the installation of an e21 LSD in your ’02. In all cases, the e21 parts referenced are the “later” e21 parts. In my case, I believe that they came from a 1980 320is. Other posts and reference material cite differences in dimensions of “early” half shafts, CV joint bolts and differential widths. See the end of this article. Primary problem: stock 2002 half shafts (CVs plus axle) are too short with a e21 LSD installed. Why: the LSD is ~10mm narrower. Secondary problem: the inner 2002 CV won’t bolt to the later LSD. Why: because the LSD uses 10mm bolts and the 2002 CV uses 8 mm bolts. Solution: Use later e21 half shafts, replacing the outer e21 CV with a 2002 CV. This allows the inner CV to bolt directly to the LSD output shafts and the outer CV to bolt directly to the wheel input shaft. The 2002 CV is used without the cupped washer that comes on the stock half shaft. The inner CV has a ¼” (6.5mm) spacer between it and the LSD output shaft. That’s it. Of course, you should take everything apart, clean and inspect the CVs and re-grease them. New CV boots and clamps finish off the project. The taking apart can be facilitated if you have a hydraulic press. A couple of the CVs nearly fell off with a light tapping, but a couple needed persuasion. I found a friend with a press which reduced the stress on the axle shaft ends that results from banging on it. Just make sure the circlips are removed first. Details I took a number of measurements of the e21 and 2002 parts. I also took some photos. What I learned was that the stock 2002 half shaft and the hybrid shaft described above are exactly the same length (see photo), yet the e21 LSD is 10mm narrower than the stock 2002 differential. This can be seen in the photo of the two differentials sitting side by side with a level on top to the 2002 output shaft. It’s sitting on a shoulder that is ~1mm-~2mm higher than the mounting surface, but you get the idea. The spacer mentioned above closes this gap. I had spacers that were 6.5mm each (1/4”), so I used them. I would have preferred to use 3/16” or 5mm, but I couldn’t find any, so I went with what I had. The ¼” variety are readily available from all of the well know ’02 suppliers. More details The cages and balls in the e21 and 2002 CV were identical. The axle shafts were not. The 2002 shafts were shorter end to end (top shaft in photo), but interestingly also had longer splined ends which I surmise is why they used the cupped washers to take up the space required to secure the CV with the circlip on the end of the half shaft. If you try to use the cupped washer on the shorter splined 320i axle, there is no way to install the circlip. I tried. Extraneous stuff I wanted to use Oetiker clamps on the dust boots which came with a prior rebuild kit. These are single use items, but low profile and very secure. I couldn’t find them at any of the local auto parts shops, so I ordered them from a metric parts house: Belmetric.com. Part # 16300029 on the CV end of the dust boot and # 16700042 on the axle end of the dust boot. These require special pliers to install and given that the local auto parts store no longer carried the clamps, they also no longer loaned out the pliers required to install them. Instead, I borrowed a pair of my friend’s pricey Pex clamp pliers which worked perfectly. The $12 Home Depot variety didn’t work (well). I also ordered conical lock nuts for the 8mm outer 2002 CV bolts. They’re called stover nuts and have oblong looking holes. These are lower profile than conventional nylock nuts and are what were used on the stock 2002 drive shaft flanges. They are <1/2 the price of the BMW versions. Bel-Metric’s parts were shipped express, so I had them in 2 days. Pretty good service and the parts were just as expected. The back story I started all of this because I wanted to fix a leaking LSD rear cover. When I originally did this conversion 10 years ago, I used a conventional gasket which always leaked, so I decided to use Permatex Ultra Black on the do over. While preparing to remove the LSD, with the car on jack stands, I noticed that the differential output shaft on one side was pulled out of the differential by 1/2”. There was a huge gap between the output shaft dust cover and the differential which kind of freaked me out. This only seemed to occur when the wheels were up in the air and their weight pulled the output shafts part way out the differential. The same thing might happen if an energetic driver got the car airborne, which it turned out my son had. It explained the splatter of Redline dripping off the differential onto my garage floor. What was most amazing about this was the discovery that when I originally did the LSD install and the half shaft conversion, I used the 2002 half shafts, which from the photos above, are much shorter. And yet the car ran around for 10,000 miles without any (obviously) adverse effects. Is there a lesson here? Just do it whatever and it will probably work? Maybe, but the great news with this site is that after I did the conversion the first time, a lot more intelligent questions were asked, with knowledgeable answers given, which helped me to get this done right the second time around. So, thanks to the FAQers who preceded me in answering questions and documenting their projects. I’m happy to add my story to the list. Parts List Quantity Description 1 2002 half shaft – only need the 2 CV joints, save cupped washers for another project 2 e21 half shafts – need 2 axles and 2 CV joints from later year 2 3/16” or ¼” spacers 12 10mm x 65mm Allen head bolts 2 Half shaft rebuild kits (2 dust boots, 2 large and 2 small Oetiker clamps, 1 tubes grease) Good references, with more detail, are : Ireland Engineering Differentials article: http://www.bmw2002.com/documents/bmw-2002-differentials.pdf 2002 FAQ post (see “Gil by the way of Gary” text): 2002 FAQ post, e21 Diff Install with 320i Inner CV Joints: 2002 FAQ Post, How to Replace a Differential: View full article
  2. Giving a nod to the 70’s Volkswagen repair manual that spawned countless others, my post is a distillation of several other posts on how to construct half shafts that work with the installation of an e21 LSD in your ’02. In all cases, the e21 parts referenced are the “later” e21 parts. In my case, I believe that they came from a 1980 320is. Other posts and reference material cite differences in dimensions of “early” half shafts, CV joint bolts and differential widths. See the end of this article. Primary problem: stock 2002 half shafts (CVs plus axle) are too short with a e21 LSD installed. Why: the LSD is ~10mm narrower. Secondary problem: the inner 2002 CV won’t bolt to the later LSD. Why: because the LSD uses 10mm bolts and the 2002 CV uses 8 mm bolts. Solution: Use later e21 half shafts, replacing the outer e21 CV with a 2002 CV. This allows the inner CV to bolt directly to the LSD output shafts and the outer CV to bolt directly to the wheel input shaft. The 2002 CV is used without the cupped washer that comes on the stock half shaft. The inner CV has a ¼” (6.5mm) spacer between it and the LSD output shaft. That’s it. Of course, you should take everything apart, clean and inspect the CVs and re-grease them. New CV boots and clamps finish off the project. The taking apart can be facilitated if you have a hydraulic press. A couple of the CVs nearly fell off with a light tapping, but a couple needed persuasion. I found a friend with a press which reduced the stress on the axle shaft ends that results from banging on it. Just make sure the circlips are removed first. Details I took a number of measurements of the e21 and 2002 parts. I also took some photos. What I learned was that the stock 2002 half shaft and the hybrid shaft described above are exactly the same length (see photo), yet the e21 LSD is 10mm narrower than the stock 2002 differential. This can be seen in the photo of the two differentials sitting side by side with a level on top to the 2002 output shaft. It’s sitting on a shoulder that is ~1mm-~2mm higher than the mounting surface, but you get the idea. The spacer mentioned above closes this gap. I had spacers that were 6.5mm each (1/4”), so I used them. I would have preferred to use 3/16” or 5mm, but I couldn’t find any, so I went with what I had. The ¼” variety are readily available from all of the well know ’02 suppliers. More details The cages and balls in the e21 and 2002 CV were identical. The axle shafts were not. The 2002 shafts were shorter end to end (top shaft in photo), but interestingly also had longer splined ends which I surmise is why they used the cupped washers to take up the space required to secure the CV with the circlip on the end of the half shaft. If you try to use the cupped washer on the shorter splined 320i axle, there is no way to install the circlip. I tried. Extraneous stuff I wanted to use Oetiker clamps on the dust boots which came with a prior rebuild kit. These are single use items, but low profile and very secure. I couldn’t find them at any of the local auto parts shops, so I ordered them from a metric parts house: Belmetric.com. Part # 16300029 on the CV end of the dust boot and # 16700042 on the axle end of the dust boot. These require special pliers to install and given that the local auto parts store no longer carried the clamps, they also no longer loaned out the pliers required to install them. Instead, I borrowed a pair of my friend’s pricey Pex clamp pliers which worked perfectly. The $12 Home Depot variety didn’t work (well). I also ordered conical lock nuts for the 8mm outer 2002 CV bolts. They’re called stover nuts and have oblong looking holes. These are lower profile than conventional nylock nuts and are what were used on the stock 2002 drive shaft flanges. They are <1/2 the price of the BMW versions. Bel-Metric’s parts were shipped express, so I had them in 2 days. Pretty good service and the parts were just as expected. The back story I started all of this because I wanted to fix a leaking LSD rear cover. When I originally did this conversion 10 years ago, I used a conventional gasket which always leaked, so I decided to use Permatex Ultra Black on the do over. While preparing to remove the LSD, with the car on jack stands, I noticed that the differential output shaft on one side was pulled out of the differential by 1/2”. There was a huge gap between the output shaft dust cover and the differential which kind of freaked me out. This only seemed to occur when the wheels were up in the air and their weight pulled the output shafts part way out the differential. The same thing might happen if an energetic driver got the car airborne, which it turned out my son had. It explained the splatter of Redline dripping off the differential onto my garage floor. What was most amazing about this was the discovery that when I originally did the LSD install and the half shaft conversion, I used the 2002 half shafts, which from the photos above, are much shorter. And yet the car ran around for 10,000 miles without any (obviously) adverse effects. Is there a lesson here? Just do it whatever and it will probably work? Maybe, but the great news with this site is that after I did the conversion the first time, a lot more intelligent questions were asked, with knowledgeable answers given, which helped me to get this done right the second time around. So, thanks to the FAQers who preceded me in answering questions and documenting their projects. I’m happy to add my story to the list. Parts List Quantity Description 1 2002 half shaft – only need the 2 CV joints, save cupped washers for another project 2 e21 half shafts – need 2 axles and 2 CV joints from later year 2 3/16” or ¼” spacers 12 10mm x 65mm Allen head bolts 2 Half shaft rebuild kits (2 dust boots, 2 large and 2 small Oetiker clamps, 1 tubes grease) Good references, with more detail, are : Ireland Engineering Differentials article: http://www.bmw2002.com/documents/bmw-2002-differentials.pdf 2002 FAQ post (see “Gil by the way of Gary” text): 2002 FAQ post, e21 Diff Install with 320i Inner CV Joints: 2002 FAQ Post, How to Replace a Differential:
  3. The note above above 3M Black Trim Adhesive with EPDM rubber is the key. I went back and forth with 3M tech support, who were very responsive, and that is what they suggested. The yellow variety is for different rubber and did not work on the URO seals not matter how clean, abraded, etc. the paint and seal were.And if you don't like the result, the 3M adhesive remover takes it all off and did not hard my paint.
  4. Here's a weird #11: make sure your gas tank matches your car. I replaced the fuel filler neck on my '70 because the old one was pretty hard. Didn't take the new one long to do the same, but that isn't the problem. I had "the smell" and decided to put a homemade charcoal canister inline on the vent hose. Seemed to make it better, but didn't fix it. 10 years went by and I occasionally had more fumes than normal after I filled the tank. Purely by accident, I had the trunk open as I was filling the tank (in Oregon, normally you can't do this yourself since it's "unsafe") and noticed gas leaking from around the flange that connects the fuel filler neck to the inlet. I did a little sleuthing through my parts book and noticed that the fuel filler neck was different on the '70 than the later Roundies. The '70 was designed to fit a vertical flange on the gas tank and then clamp to a horizontal flange on the rear quarter panel. I had the right gas tank, but no flange on the quarter panel and instead the fittings used on later model Roundies, which were designed for the later model fuel filler neck. As it turns out, my rear end is not original, which I knew because of the long eared bumpers, but I never knew about the differences in the fuel filler neck and related fittings.So instead of replacing my rear end to get the right flange for the fuel filler neck or replacing the tank to allow the correct filler neck, I made a gasket to take up the gap in the upper part of the filler neck where it clamps to the fittings form the later Roundies. This fixed the leak and should cure at least a lot of the smell since I won't have gas sloshing around in the trunk after every fill.
  5. Check this site http://www.zeebuck.com/bimmers/bmvseite/ for details on installing the 80 amp 318i alternator. I did it and it works great.
  6. Windshield wiper motor? 3 wire with ground.
  7. I used bellmetric model 16700042 and 16300029. They worked great with a friend's profesional grade pex pliers. The $10 home depot variety didn't do the trick.
  8. I have a pair of the first version of the Bolt-on-Bliss kick panels along with the matching black carpet pieces from Esty. As you can see from the photos, I cut a hole in the driver's side to test fit a Rockford-Fosgate 5.25" speaker. In full disclosure, I am selling these because without metal modifications on my '70 02, the speakers will not fit. But,they may work for you. I'd like $100 but will accept any reasonable offer. Send me note if you are interested.
  9. I agree with Blunt and others about the ease of installation of the OEM rubber bushings. $5 worth of parts from the hardware store and the in and out is not a big deal. With that said, a couple of caveats. I assembled the contraption with all-thread, washers, nuts and PVC as described above. The old bushings, which were in bad shape, came out without difficultly. The new ones, even with a 30 ton press, would not go in. Prior to the press, I tried using my Chinese vice and a long persuader on the vice handle, and snapped the vice.Turns out that they were the wrong ones, even though the part # was correct. An exchange corrected the problem and they went in without difficultly using the method described. Interestingly, this thread seems to be focused on the choice of bushing material based upon its ease of installation. I'd submit that the choice should be made based upon the intended use of the car. My '70 came with a poly steering coupler and motor mounts. The steering wheel vibration at 3000 RPMs drove me nuts, so I removed them. Vibration went away. Subsequently, I had the motor rebuilt (2.3L stroker) and completely refreshed the front suspension. Everything. Stock springs, Bilstein HDs, new ball joints and I chose OEM parts for the ST sway bars mounts (used the urethane links that came with them), the steering coupler, control arm bushings, motor mounts and rear subframe mounts and anywhere else that was originally rubber. I'm quite happy with the result mostly because the use of rubber fit my use of the car. It's a well sorted out street vehicle. Not used on the track or for auto cross where a less forgiving suspension might matter. So, I'd think about what you want to accomplish with the car and then refit it appropriately.
  10. I'm looking for a e21 rear axle to complete my LSD install. Just the axle... I don't need the CVs, but would be happy to take the whole half shaft to save you the trouble of dissasembly. The axle I have has been abused to the point so that I cannot install the snap ring. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I'm in Portland.
  11. My problem: a small leak in the LSD cover required removal of the LSD which required that the inner CV joints/half shafts be unbolted. In the process, before unbolting the left inner CV, I noticed a ~1/2" gap between the axle stub dust cover and the LSD. Essentially, the stub had pulled partially out of the carrier when the car was jacked up and the wheels were dangling from the rear subframe. My suspicion is that I had used the 2002 axles, instead of the longer 320i axles, when I rebuilt the half shafts to accommodate the LSD, resulting in an axle that was too short, even tough I had used the prescribed 1/2" spacer. The photo below shows (on the left) what I believe to be an original 2002 half shaft, although the CVs look different than the 2002 CV on the rebuilt unit on the right. Also, for comparison, I placed a known 320i axle to the far right of the two half shafts. Both assembled half shafts are compressed. The left stays compressed because everything is old and tired, the right one is lubed and loose and the rubber boots spring it out a bit but the length difference, even with the spacer in place on the right, is ~3/4". So I think I've been running around with short half shafts for the last 15K miles. So, my questions: 1) Is the left half shaft from an '02? CV joints look different (they have the beveled edge). Just curious. 2) Is the right rebuilt half shaft also likely an '02 axle (i.e. too short)? 3) If yes, should these '02 axles be replaced by the known 320i axles? A previous commenter mentioned that it doesn't really matter which combination of parts are used, but to me, that ~1/2" gap seems to be too big for safe long term use. 4) How likely is this to have screwed up the CV joints? Typical indications of terminal wear on the bearings/races? 5) Do the 4 ridges on the known 320i axle have any directional orientation (i.e. wheel side or LSD side) on the half shaft? Thanks for the help!
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