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  1. halboyles

    halboyles

    Turbo


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  2. Son of Marty

    Son of Marty

    Solex


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      7

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      2,984


  3. pehlivanov_tii

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      6

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      522


  4. tjones02

    tjones02

    Solex


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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/19/2021 in all areas

  1. I would love to know if there’s anyone in the world who have owned their 2002tii longer than my parents. 2760007 was purchased new by my parents on February 5th 1972.
    6 points
  2. Yes indeed it is Toby. Sorry I don't have any pics of it installed but we have been so busy making the linkage kits I haven't had time for much else. Basically you bolt this where the normal guibo goes and this insures that the transmission and the front part of the driveshaft are perfectly aligned. You can then move the transmission and driveshaft as one unit to determine the optimum placement and shimming of the CSB and transmission brackets. Then with the mounting points bolted in place, you simply remove the alignment tool and replace it with the new guibo. This simple tool eliminates all the guessing, eyeballing, measuring, "hoping it's right" kind of installation we have been stuck with over the last 50 years. It is especially helpful with a 5-speed conversion because of the strange-angled installations you sometimes end up with. Technicians who have to do this procedure on a regular basis really appreciate the time saved and the confidence that it is done right. I'd like to donate a couple of these to the FAQ as loaner tools but I don't see any mention of such a program on the website. I could perhaps start a thread and folks could just forward the tool to the next requester after using it?
    4 points
  3. Back then when i was doing this i was interested in that too, if i understand you correct. Color is non metallic grey, at least this found out and what was left from the original color i think was close too. Here are photos from my assembly. This is for euro 73 roundie.
    4 points
  4. Just so you know, the ti style side draft linkage set we make also works with the Jenvey "DCOEs".
    4 points
  5. Building on Slavs’ and Rocco’s comments regarding brakes, I would add the following notes. I’ve had four ‘02’s with which I’ve spent serious driving time over the last 48 years: ‘67 1600-2, ‘70 2002, ‘73 2002tii, and ‘76 2002. In terms of engines and brakes, all of my cars have been essentially stock (the ‘76 has tii front brakes currently). If I had to rank these four cars in terms of stopping power and distance, I would unhesitatingly rank their brakes, in their ability to stop the car in a short distance, in the order of their production dates, with the best — yes, the best — brakes being those on the ‘67 1600-2 (54K when I purchased it ca. 1974) and the worst brakes being those on the ‘76 2002 (bought new). All four cars’ brakes would fade to nothing in the face of extreme driving, something I apparently did often in the ‘70’s but refrain from in a 50-year-old car. I have a very simple explanation of why stopping power decreased over the nine years that separated my ‘67 from my ‘76: weight. I moved directly from the ‘67 to the ‘76 in 1976. I can’t tell you how many times I complained to the dealer about the ‘76’s brakes, and had them checked, flushed, or whatever, because they couldn’t measure up to my 1600-2’s brakes! If you’re going to turn a 1600-2 into a fire-breathing dragon with 150 hp, a brake upgrade is in order. But stock 1600-2 brakes are great in a stock-powered 1600-2. And, yes, parts availability for the early cars is not good. And the solution to that, nowadays, is expensive rebuilds by brake-specialist shops such as White Post or Jaymic. My point is that the “upgrades” BMW brought to ‘02 brakes, both over time and with some sub-models (e.g., tii’s), were minor, and perhaps inadequate, in the face of increased power and, more importantly, weight. An early 1600-2, all 2,072 lbs. of it, is a great car, particularly with sway bars and good tires! Best regards, Steve
    3 points
  6. mice with a penchant for collecting small, shiny metal objects? I'd really love to hear more backstory about the car/motor. Was this a recent project acquisition? Or have you a fair bit of ownership miles with it? I will say, the damage on #2 was definitely what killed it. But most of the damage on 1-3-4 all look to have some time on them due to the buildup of oil/carbon in the ol' nook-and-crannies. There's little of the fresh metal dinging exposed. Maybe this car lived a life with a butter-fingered mechanic who finished every job a few pieces of hardware short of where he started. Or perhaps the car was part of a bitter divorce, and whoever lost custody of the car wasn't happy about it? Or MAYBE, it lived a life in an underground recycling yard racing scene, Mad-Maxing with reckless abandon open-carb amongst the wreckage of fallen competitors, devouring their shiny remains. Sooo many possible plots.
    3 points
  7. No thanks needed on my part, I would recommend a good scissors jack over trying to find a imitation of the oem jack, using it under the front or rear subframe will be much safer than the one legged contraption the car came with.
    3 points
  8. Had a nice hat trick... Installed an NK steering wheel (Thanks @Hans W. !)... Installed a custom plasma cut throttle return bring bracket from a fellow Alfista (Thanks Alex J!)... Took Schon to the Reopening of the Berkeley CnC...
    3 points
  9. Great find, lovely car, perfect colour, and I'd concur with everyone about the original brakes - I drove my '67 fairly hard in the mountains and didn't experience any fade. Are you keeping it relatively stock, do you have a plan? Ti replica would be nice, but as they left the factory is also great. Superb wheels too. Good luck
    2 points
  10. I used bench clamp or cabinet clamp (idk which one is the right word in english but i think you know what i mean) to hold the brackets while i am trying to remove the pivots. I used a flat screwdriver to press the pivots out from the bushings. Use some wd40 before trying. The bushings are usually strong, so i dont think they are easy for breaking, but anyway take your time. Under the bushings where the pivots are rotating i polished a little bit and lubed well, to be easier for rotating (first photo). When you assemble just press again the pivot to the bracket, like on the second photo. The pivots and everything how everything is assembled was kind of confusing first to me, so like everything else i made few photos before disassembling. Hope that helps.
    2 points
  11. The Red/white wire(s) comes from fuse #2. One goes to the hazard button, and the other goes to the interior light. Both are always "hot"...but fuse protected. There is also a Red/white wire underneath the horn ring. This is for the ignition buzzer. All your other wires are shown in my sketch of the blue wiring harness in the engine bay. Yes, there is a connection at the top of the starter solenoid. This is the Black/red from the starter to the + coil terminal.
    2 points
  12. Nice Car ! That's a typical California survivor. I would guess Southern California or parts of California other than the mountain communities. I've come across many such early 1600s during the past 40 years. They were really cheap over here during the 80s and 90s, in the $500 range for many years. At one point most ended up in the salvage yards, including the self service yards. The amount of rust on the cars and its location is typical of California cars from that era. It's not extreme, but annoying. The Bristol (058 - BMW color code) is most likely original to the car. The rear badge style and its placement is correct for a 67 and early 68. But, your car is an early 68, judging by the large bumper guards and placement of the rear view mirror. Somebody replaced the original and smaller and more elegant swan neck mirror with one from a later BMW. You mentioned that the previous owner also replaced the original long neck diff with a later short neck version. This wasn't a simple swap as it required also swapping the entire rear sub frame and installation of the longer driveshaft for the short neck diff. They most likely also replaced the original 4 speed with a later 4 speed. Is the car still equipped with a 1.6L , or have they installed a 2.0L. I wonder what the diff ratio is in that short neck. I’ve never seen an early 68 with a padded dash and the rear badge in upper corner location such as you car. Your car should have the earlier non padded lower dash pad with chrome strip. Somebody may have installed a later 3 piece dash in your car, or they installed the early style rear badge on a later 68. Your seats are from a post 68 car. Your dash may be from a later 68 or even later. The original brakes are adequate and work well when everything is in working order. Early 2002s, 1968- early 69, also had the same calipers with and single circuit brakes, but with a different brake booster as found on most 2002s. Those are certainly Cosmic MK1 wheels. In my opinion they are the best looking Cosmic wheels. I run them on my early 67, disguised to look like a 66. They were made in the UK. And the Lotus Europa and Mini guys love them. One of the Lotus Europa fellows here in LA explained to me they use the identical 51/2" x 13" Cosmic MK1s with the same 100mm lug pattern. He also added that some of the MK1s are Magnesium while others are aluminum or alloy. Cosmics are also common on classic VWs and Porches. You can find new original style steel center cap covers, which use retaining clips, from classic VW vendors. I purchased a set for my car back in 2011 for only $5 / each. I'll provide you the link when I find it. Don't group all roundies into one category. There is a huge amount of variation among them. And, this also relates to the early 1600-2s, which went through more changes between 1966-69 than the 2002 did from 68-76. I've attached a recent pic of my 67 1600-2 Bristol with the Cosmic MK1s from a ski trip to the local mountains' last month. I run 205/60 X 13" Dunlop tires on those wheels.
    2 points
  13. Thanks all, apparently the problem is solved thanks to the wisdom of this group. @SonofMarty, You hit the issue right out of the gate on the first post. After applying oil to the linkage as I described in my earlier post, the first test drive seemed to be working well, so I made a longer drive (copying the earlier troublesome route) this afternoon to verify. I was able to come home, lift the front and spin the wheel by hand. I also had to actually watch out and make sure I wasn’t drifting back on at stoplights because I had gotten used to it just freezing up and staying still. Thanks so much everyone, I really appreciate all the interest and great advice. Now that this issue is apparently behind me for now, I’ll move forward and continue with maintenance that I believe needs to be done. Especially for a car that had 18-year-old tires and a 10-year-old battery when I purchased it. I will plan to do as much as my skills allow, and I plan to proceed with bleeding the brake system first. At the hardware store when I was buying the oil and tubing I was directed to another customer buy a staff member who is also a vintage car enthusiast. Another BMW owner, the customer recommended that I get a pressurized system on Amazon to make it easy to do by myself. I’ve looked at it and it seems like a great idea for the low cost. If members here recommend that I replace the brake lines(considering the years that have past since the car has been fully maintained) i’m open to suggestions for the best replacements. Also, in the good luck bad luck category of things like this, when I tried to lower the car on the OEM roadside Jack, which has been my partner on this journey, the jack failed to lower the car (it can now raise but not descend). So now I have that hidden surprise issue out-of-the-way also. If anyone knows of a good replacement source (I have checked the auction site already) I’m all ears. In fact, I am wondering if the E series jacks will work safely even though they have a subtle design change where there’s a hook instead of just the bump that goes under the lift point. Mostly. Thanks again all, it’s great to have the car back in operable condition.
    2 points
  14. Those are lovely. If I didn't already have a similar (albeit less sexy) setup I'd be all over it.
    2 points
  15. I put together the same cost list to install the Jenvey Heritage throttle bodies and convert to EFI. Starting with nothing and paying retail for everything, every nut and bolt and AN fitting was $4700. That was with a cheaper Hyperfuels fuel pump, Microsquirt, more expensive Kooglewerks air cleaner, full AN plumbing, a breather system and setting up a proper cam sensor. Doing the wiring, small amount of fabrication and machining myself.
    2 points
  16. Give it a try it's by far your cheapest option. A shy boy never gets to dance.
    2 points
  17. I have a tool that aligns the front half of the driveshaft to the transmission which then allows you make adjustments to the CSB, trans mount,...before tightening the guibo in place. Pics attached. Please PM interested.
    2 points
  18. Spring time in Pacific Grove California
    1 point
  19. try priming the carb with a bit of gas or a squirt of starter fluid
    1 point
  20. Try pumping the gas pedal 2 or 3 times before cranking if your not already.
    1 point
  21. Bavarian Rennsport at the Banks St. location in San Diego, circa 91? Bill Holmes at the wheel. my refrigerator-white '76 at center, repainted from Mintgrun by a PO.
    1 point
  22. Build date is July 1975. I removed windshield spray nozzles and the clear tubing from the firewall so I assume there was a bottle and sensor removed at some point.
    1 point
  23. +25mm! Fuck yes! You thought you'd seen a siamesed block before!
    1 point
  24. I got you beat! 93 cars between yours and mine. 1562017
    1 point
  25. Great turnout with a few folks driving quite some distance! Just iPhone pix as I elected to keep my camera at home Sat:
    1 point
  26. Some pics from last weekend. Beautiful day.
    1 point
  27. Thank you Steve, I am "slowly" putting together a comic book of sorts.... a "Dummies Guide to 2002's". Absolutely no insult intended. I just realize there are many '02 owners who don't know where to start when trying to solve electrical, fuel or mechanical issues, especially PO cars that have been neglected or butchered. Stay tuned, John
    1 point
  28. It might also help to remove the sender from the water neck (you'll have to drain some coolant so it doesn't make a mess leaking) and the wire brush both the threads on the sender and the threads in the neck. Brass and aluminum don't always play nicely together, and since the sender grounds through its threads, even a little resistance will either cause a false reading, or none at all. mike
    1 point
  29. instrument cluster plug contacts for a 12 fuse US model from the factory manual, pg 61-0/32: Pin # Wire color goes to 1 green fuse 11 2 red/white hazard flasher switch 3 brown blower switch 4 grey/blue auto trans shift lever light connector 5 brown/blue brake fluid level switch 6 green/white connection for fuel pump (tii) 7 brown/green oil pressure sender 8 black/white hazard/turn signal flasher unit 9 white 5 pin plug then to fog lamp relay connection by the battery 10 brown/yellow fuel gauge sender 11 brown/white 5 pin plug then to temp gauge sender 12 blue (?) 5 pin plug then to terminal 8 on "program test" plug A quick search brought up the post above from Mike.
    1 point
  30. I bought two sets from Seb recently and they were better than described. Stand up guy and they got here quick from Germany.
    1 point
  31. Yes. Numbers are stamped to identify the different arm lengths. I measured them when I replaced everything on both my 69 and 73 wipers.
    1 point
  32. i wouldn't risk it due to low melting temps, hardening and cracking with age and etc get a clear fuel filter if you want to see gas
    1 point
  33. Link to Cosmic Center Caps. They seem to be out of stock now, though. It's a VW vendor. I would contact them to check if and when they will be in stock again. https://www2.cip1.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=C32-COS-5515-CAP
    1 point
  34. Time to complete: Approx. 10 hrs to complete from cutting out sheetmetal, metal work and shaping to weld in place. Okay... I did some searching around and could not find any information on fitting later model 3-series seats into the cars - so I figured I would do it myself and post the results for others in the future to keep as a reference. Because of the stock hump, your limited to getting 'other' type seats in the car because it puts the seat 2-3" higher than needed and because of the shape of the floor, it didn't sit flat, square and firm. If the seat has a height adjustments like the ones I got, why loose that functionality by setting them all the way down just to get them to fit. Another Note: the seat pan area was slightly narrower than the width of the rails making the seat 'cock-eye' in the car. Even after drilling out the factory seat pedestals, the seats didn't sit flat and firm. Bottom line, they just didn't fit. Now, before I get flamed by the 'purists', my car has been worked pretty good. It was bound to be a 'race' car by its previous younger owner . It has a roll cage installed and everything not race related (or maybe for lightening) was yanked out and tossed Because the original seats were not the greatest, and I didn't want to take the time to recover them, I got a nice set of 6 way, mechanical adjustable seats from an E46 coupe. They have up/down, front/back, back tilt and front of seat under leg support. They fit nice and tight around my body and felt good. I needed to get the floor hump out and make it flat. Only 60% of the seat rails sat on the hump and I felt making a bracket to support the rear of the seat would have looked tacky. Because of the large surface area, I added a circular bead roll to stiffen up the floor (with about a 33/2 step) to keep any oil-canning out of the equation, especially after welding it in. If you also notice, I put 2 sheet metal brakes on the side attaching to the inner rocker panel. I hole-punched the flange I created and spot welded to the inside of the rocker to give it a factory finish feel. The most difficult spot in the floor was the rear outside corner which had a small stretched curve where the foot well for the back seat met the new floor pan being installed. I cut approximately 18" of floor to clear the hump completely out so that back of the floor would flow from rear to front relatively flat. I used a large right angle to make place my cuts perpendicular from the straightest points on the inner rocker panel. All cuts along the trans tunnel were just below the carrier bearing mounts. If you drill out the spot welds from the original seat pedestals, you can draw a straight line parallel to the ground along those welds and clear it with no problems. Remember, there is also the front end support boxes under the car (sorry if bad terminology), my cuts at the front of my new floor panel were just at the tips of these factory weld-on supports. If you wire wheel the floor, you can see the spot welds and a small dimple in the floor made by the factory. A simple weld bead was added to secure the tips that were cut off to ensure structural strength. (Sorry for the group shot, but I realized, I lost my original photos and this is all I could get my hands on.) Here is a shot of the floor itself after its been installed. Take your time spot welding it in. I spot every corner and center between corners to stiffen it up. I used panel clips to line up the new floor piece so that it can be butt welded in place with a 1/8" gap. Remove the claims when you have the preliminary tacks welds holding it in place. Spot stitch the panel in, switching from front to back and sides to keep the heat to a minimum; reducing any warping. I chose to extend the tunnel to the floor (spot welding the connection between the floor and tunnel) as it was much easier and after having it ground clean, it would have a nice appearance. The end result is a nice fit and the feet sit flat on the floor. The seats recline with no obstructions. Its nice and solid. Ill go back and grind down the welds and cover the welded area with POR-15 and top it off with some self leveling seam sealer.
    1 point
  35. Today I tried the tennis ball trick on the pop out windows. Drove down the I5 this morning cruising at 70 * mph, had sunroof open about half way and rear pop outs open. Great ventilation and the noise wasn't too bad. The pop outs stayed open and never rattled. I still kept the heater core valve open, so had nice heat in the morning.
    1 point
  36. Do you need full sequential fuel and timing? Bank fire fuel + wasted spark will run just as well. If you're tuning to the edge for a race motor, sure, go full sequential. For a street motor, not necessary (IMHO) I did see someone modify a distributor housing to act as a cam sensor, but there will always be some play in that type of assembly that kind of defeats the purpose.
    1 point
  37. Yep, 1975 Blue Sheath wiring harness, see diagram below. One wire in that harness is the resistor wire that runs from fuse #12 to the positive terminal on your coil. I see it looks like you upgraded to an IE Mechanical distributor with Pertronix? Did you change the coil as well? If you are running a Blue Coil or another coil with internal resistance, you will need to swap out the resistor wire for a solid wire to the "+" side of the coil. Mark92131
    1 point
  38. those are related to smog device solenoids that are no longer on your car...they were attached to the firewall originally...on those brackets the wires are hanging from
    1 point
  39. Heh. And a scattershield... t the exhaust manifold swallowed the turbo like a python swallowing a rat...
    1 point
  40. SoM, I hear you- I've seen heads that would have made better sponges once they are boiled out. However, given that this is a cosmetic area (in other words, not affecting the combustion chambers, bearings, etc) I'd try fixing it. Welding these heads is NOT as bad as most aluminum castings- BMW's material- handling was (and still is, through the E46, at least) fantastic. IF you keep it really clean, there's hardly any inclusion or slag, and the puddle's very manageable. This front area's also a void, so getting it hot enough won't be too hard. It's TOTALLY a gamble, I agree- but given how good the water passages look from the pre- and post- cleaning pictures, it's a gamble I'd take. I've seen- and used- heads with far more erosion around the sealing area, and they've held just fine. It's an otherwise known head, and we'll ASSume the shop will pressure- test it again afterwards. t would try welding it first.
    1 point
  41. Single 6” sub in enclosure, 2 ohms impedance, powered by sub channel from my period Soundstream Reference 405s amp. The sub was originally a 10” Kicker in a big enclosure. It took up too much space, plus my days of bleeding ears after a drive are behind me... We’ll see if the 6” has enough ooomph.
    1 point
  42. Great responses, Thanks! popovm, I look forward to sharing experiences, as we go through resto process. Is there a way to restrict google to the forum itself? That seems like a really valuable trick 2002iii given your thoughts and others, I may just repair the fenders I have, they aren't all that bad, and I am pretty good at fabrication. Mike Self - cool to meet another 43 year owner! I think I will keep the car more compliant than you have done. Years ago I put in sway bars with urethane, and bilstein HD shocks. I tossed the shock within a year and tried KYBs. Tossed 'em. Went to HD sachs. Kept the sway bars, though. Love that you have a Topolino (or two?) Im a big fan of those and the TV1200. And the 850. Dudeland , great tips! I knew about the door latch grommets, but a great tip for anyone who doesn't! What a difference. I DIDN'T know about the steering box rebuild kit, and that is very exciting! I have 3 or four steering boxes, and non of them are particularly precise. This could be huge, because I remember when I first drove BMWs and was amazed at the steering precision, and mine no longer has that. I think your aesthetic is similar to mine WRT ride. Have done a heavier front sway bar. I dont remember what I did in the rear. jgerock I have tii wheels, and I think I changed out the front struts to tii or bavaria, I just can't remember...and Im not sure how to tell. Any other differences? Maybe give me some keywords to search for to find threads on this? Paul I'll look into it. I've watched videos that show people fitting the aftermarket ones, and they look easy to fine tune. with a nip and tuck, a little weld, they seem to fit up nice. I'll do some more searching of the archives, especially if I can figure out how to do it with google. Thanks all! Walter
    1 point
  43. Welcome to the clan, you are in good company here. If looking for the stock feel, many folks insist on rubber suspension bushings, rather than urethane. New bushings along with motor mounts may take some squeak and rattle out of it. When i picked up my car, the small plastic grommets at the end of the door latch and lock actuator rods fixed some really annoying rattles. Stainless steel flexible brake lines are a must, just for safety. Check the fuel line, chances are it is yellow and brittle. Led headlights and bulbs are a nice upgrade, but they do require a bit of fiddling. Some may argue that they are crap, but I really like the bright lights as a result. I would avoid doing the ones in the dash, a bit of a pain and not terribly necessary. I suspect that you are used to setting up points, but if you get tired of them, put a pertronix or hot spark in and you won't need to fiddle with them again. Repack the CV's and replace the boots while you are there. Luckily there is a rebuild kit for the steering box in case yours has a lot of slop in it. There is a rubber coupler there that can get brittle. I replaced my with a urethane one, and it just made things more harsh, stick to the oem rubber and you are fine. Refresh the rubber shifter bits, I think Blunt sells a kit. It will make the shifter feel much better. Check the mount when you are in there. Again use a rubber one, the urethane is just noisy and I am not sure it gets you anything but more road noise. All of what I mentioned above without the steering box is $300-$400 all in. It will make the feel of the car so much better. It will take a bit of grunting, and a bunch of PB blaster, some threaded rod and PCV for removing the bushings, but it will be well worth it. If you wanted to "upgrade" anything from stock, front a rear sway bars (mine are from I.E) would be the one I recommend first. Good for keeping the tires on the ground, especially under emergency situations. And it doesn't make things bone crushing. Once you get it on the road, you can decide if it needs shocks. Searching the FAQ is your best friend. 99% of the answers are there. if you are finding you are not getting a response on the forum, chances are it is because it is a question that has been answered 10 times before. l
    1 point
  44. Or, you could just use the above tool which does all of that in much less time and gets in right the first time!!
    1 point
  45. +1 422 U.S.-spec tii’s (VIN’s 2760001 through 2760422) were built by the end of 1971. Easily the best source, without going to BMW Group Archives, is our Registry: lots of tii’s and manufacturing dates in there, as Les points to. But I don’t see your car in there, Dave! 😳 It will take you 30 seconds. If you don’t have 30 seconds, please tell me and I’ll happily put your car in the Registry! Regards, Steve
    1 point
  46. Check here for a few............ https://www.bmw2002faq.com/registry/page/19/?d=11
    1 point
  47. All of my problems with the 2002 alternator have been vibration- related- I first went to the E21 alternators because the wires vibrated and failed at the alternator. And I had had regulator problems. Then the Botch alternators started shaking apart at sustained high revs- which was when I went to the ND alternators like theNomad posted, and never had to mess with it ever after. t
    1 point
  48. I drove my '69 to our local BMW CCA chapter meeting. (That's Wolfgang, the Nevada car on the right in my avatar) It's first real outing since last November, and that was the first time I had driven it in over a year. I checked my maintenance log--the last time I filled the tank in that car was 2013! And it's running just fine on four year old gas. However I did treat it to some fresh gas this evening. On the way down to the meeting, a guy in a tricked out H-D bike rode past and gave me a big thumbs up. Still puts a big grin on my face when I drive it--after 48 years of ownership. mike
    1 point
  49. Lol- my dear departed father in law told this version many times: Pete and Repeat were sitting on a fence. Pete fell off. Who was left? Another neat solution- thanks for sharing!
    1 point
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