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mcaden

Front Brake Pad Installation (pics)

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I went to install front brake pads on my '73 2002 with stock brakes earlier this week. My current pads ended up still having plenty of life, but I thought I would post pictures to the extent that might help others.

My process followed from Haynes:

1. Parts/Tools - new brake pads, 1/8" flat head punch, small hammer, brake cleaner (note: depending on the condition of your retaining pins and anti-rattle spring, you could need replace them)

2. Jack up car and remove the front wheels

3. Extract the two retaining pins using your small hammer and 1/8 inch flat head punch to gently tap out the retaining pins and the anti-rattle spring. You tap on the small end of the pin located on the outer side of the caliper. See pic below of two pins and spring.

Before picture of caliper, two retaining pins, and anti-rattle spring:

IMG_5567.jpg

4. Withdraw the pads by gripping ends with a pair of pliers or using a flat head screw driver. In the picture below, I have removed the pins, spring, and the outer brake pad.

IMG_5571.jpg

5. Once the pads are out, brush any dust from the ends of the pistons

6. Here is a picture of the pins, spring, and pads out of my car (you can also see the tool kit you'll need - mentioned in step 1).

IMG_5574.jpg

7. Inspect the thickness of your disc pad friction material. If it has worn to 2.00 mm or less than the pads should be replaced on both front bakes as an axle set. My pads were okay.

8. Clean your pins, pads, and anti-rattle spring with brake cleaner. This is also a good time to check your rotors for runout/wobble, cracks, thickness, or other problems.

9. If you need to install new pads, use a syphoning device (I had a turkey baster - see below picture) to withdraw some fluid out of your reservoir. When you compress your pistons some additional brake fluid will be displaced and it will ensure your fluid reservoir doesn't overflow. If installing new pads, after removing the brake fluid from the reservoir (remember brake fluid eats paint and causes rust, so be careful with it), use a flat peice of wood or metal to compress the caliper pistons into their cylinders in order to accept the new thicker depth pads.

IMG_5573.jpg

10. Install your new pads, the spring, and the pins in the reverse order. Here is what mine looked like after cleaning up the pins and springs.

IMG_5578.jpg

11. After you put your wheels back on and lower your car to the ground... remember to pump your foot brake hard a few times, test your brakes, and top back up the fluid reservoir. You're done.

-Marc

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Good looking write up. Might add a proper caliper compression method for the noobies that might find this..?

the key for installing new ones is just that. I leave the old pads and use a big c clamp (or big channel lock plier) to squeeze them in.

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The old spring in your first picture seems to face one way and the new spring in the last picture is opposite...

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The old spring in your first picture seems to face one way and the new spring in the last picture is opposite...

You were spot on... I just took off both of my front wheels and one of my pad retainer clips was inverted. FWIW, I noticed no difference and it held the pads in without rattling... but I just switched it anyway. Good eye.

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I believe the first picture is the correct way... My understanding is not only to reduce noise but more importantly spread the pads back out when the brakes are not applied. I guess that's why the spring meets the pad at an angle to act like a ramp..don't want drag then heat then brake fade.

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I believe the first picture is the correct way... My understanding is not only to reduce noise but more importantly spread the pads back out when the brakes are not applied. I guess that's why the spring meets the pad at an angle to act like a ramp..don't want drag then heat then brake fade.

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I like your installation process. I think most of the things you did is the common process. Pretty nice write up dude. This is what you've learned from the years of maintaining your car.

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This will be my first time replacing brake pads. I have a couple of questions:

1. Regarding using a syphoning devise to withdraw fluid. Where exactly is the fluid being withdrawn from?

2. Can someone guide me to a tutorial for replacing rear brakes?

3. What else should I inspect while I'm down there replacing the pads?

 

Thanks in advance and apologies if these questions are redundant. Just looking to learn

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Remove fluid from the reservoir under the hood to prevent fluid pushing out of the top when you compress the pistons- especially if the old pads are thin. Inspect wheel bearing play, flex lines, bushings, shock/strut leakage or damage.

Should be several write ups here about the slightly more complex rear brake shoe service. Make sure to order the correct parts for your car- especially if upgraded to E21 rear brakes which are different.

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Remove fluid from the reservoir under the hood to prevent fluid pushing out of the top when you compress the pistons- especially if the old pads are thin. Inspect wheel bearing play, flex lines, bushings, shock/strut leakage or damage.

Should be several write ups here about the slightly more complex rear brake shoe service. Make sure to order the correct parts for your car- especially if upgraded to E21 rear brakes which are different.

Thanks so much for that jgerock. I was 99% sure that is what was being referred to but didn't want to make any assumptions re my brakes.

Do you have an idea of what I should look at to diagnose my brake pedal sticking when I release it. It sticks and I can manually pull it up about an inch or two with my hand. I also suspect that the pad is sticking as well and not just that the pedal alone is the issue.

 

I've tried searching for the rear using brake pedal stick and sticking and that yields no result. Thanks in advance.

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Sorry to resurrect an old thread but i just changed the calipers, pads and stainless steel lines but cant figure out how the anti-rattle spring fits, do they fit on the outside edge (behind the pads) or should they be on the inside of the pads

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