jgerock

2002tii Chrome scale model (how to photograph?)

15 posts in this topic Last Reply

Recommended Posts

I purchased this 1:18 scale model from BMW's website 2 years ago. It is heavy and the doors and hood open. According to the package it is/was limited to 2002 pieces.

Any advice for trying to take a good picture of a chrome model?? Both the black and white backgrounds provide iffy results, along with the "AUTO" and "macro" settings on my camera.

BMWmodels017.jpg

BMWmodels018.jpg

BMWmodels019.jpg

BMWmodels007.jpg

BMWmodels016.jpg

BMWmodels010.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous

Jim, No help on the photo inquiry (other than outdoor, overcast lighting), but I really like the color scheme on the car. That would really distinguish your car (or mine)... Este-like. Regards.

_________________________

Roger

'72 Malaga

RBenson685@aol.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jim, No help on the photo inquiry (other than outdoor, overcast lighting), but I really like the color scheme on the car. That would really distinguish your car (or mine)... Este-like. Regards.

_________________________

Roger

'72 Malaga

RBenson685@aol.com

LOL Roger! The entire car has a chrome finish (not two-tone).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jim, I think proper lighting would help you acquire much better results. A flash on your camera is the last thing you want to use, and just a regular lamp won't work.

If you have a work lamp with halogen bulbs, you could play with that. Like the type on a stand with two lamps. Or if you have a kitchen w/ a c-load of ceiling lamps that flood light onto a counter, that works really well. I've taken pictures of chrome like that and it worked great.

maybe once you get good light on it, a medium grey or dark grey background would work nicely.

Or you could just ship it to me & I'll put it on my mantle. =D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A friend of mine is a professional photographer and uses "soft boxes" for product photography. Perhaps you could put a white sheet in front of a few halogen lamps to create a diffuse lighting. Just not too close, don't want to catch them on fire! I am not certain this will help you, but here is a link to illustrate the idea:

http://www.diyphotography.net/homestudio/cheap-diy-flash-mounted-softbox

My friend also does a lot of "painting with light" which could be helpful. This is done with very low light, a small flashlight, and very long exposures. He will layer up to 20 images on a single negative (large format camera) to get the effect he wants.

An Internet search on photographing chrome may yield some results. Here's one:

http://photo.net/digital-camera-forum/00787L

Fred

'74tii

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Off camera flashes with umbrellas would be a big help here.

A softbox on your hot shoe flash would also help as mentioned above.

In the absence of those supplies try this:

Use continuous off-camera light such as two desk lamps or garage work lights, one camera left and one right (try on a 45 degree angle to the model and move them back and forth until you like the light).

Get your camera off auto and put it on AV (aperture priority)

bump the f stop up to 5.6 or 7.1

half depress the shutter and see what shutter speed you get, you need at least 1/30, any less and you need a really steady hand or a tripod

if you don't get 1/30, increase the ISO until you get an appropriate shutter speed.

Take a bunch of shots, fiddle with the lights and settings and see what you like

Enjoy your new camera

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to everyone for the suggestions. As I've mentioned before, I'm just getting started with the Nikon D3000 which has tons more features than my tiny Canon Powershot SD630 (mainly used in the garage).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was going to say, take it outside in the sunlight!

;-)

Cheers,

Ray

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spring is coming.

I think!

;-)

Cheers,

Ray

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Put it on a smooth white sheet in a sunlit area (no flash) and shoot on manual mode with the center weighted light meter. Read the light for a mid-tone area on the car, not the general scene. If using a point and shoot, select a 400 ISO and tinker with the +/- exposure settings. If using a SLR, select a 400 ISO, a middle of the road F stop and tinker with the shutter speed.. You want to blow out (overexpose) the detail in the sheet while nailing the exposure of the car. This should give you a cool looking and detailed shot.

And if you're real good, supplement the light with bounce flash off the ceiling..!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Put it on a smooth white sheet in a sunlit area (no flash) and shoot on manual mode with the center weighted light meter. Read the light for a mid-tone area on the car, not the general scene. If using a point and shoot, select a 400 ISO and tinker with the +/- exposure settings. If using a SLR, select a 400 ISO, a middle of the road F stop and tinker with the shutter speed.. You want to blow out (overexpose) the detail in the sheet while nailing the exposure of the car. This should give you a cool looking and detailed shot.

And if you're real good, supplement the light with bounce flash off the ceiling..!

Thanks Jason - I've got some homework to do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now