c.d.iesel

2000 SA (1970 South Africa) YIKES!! leaf springs!!!

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NK2000SOAFR1.jpg

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rear leaf springs with aux air-springs for increased

loads, and for smuggling heavy Rhino-Horn quickly

across unimproved tracks.

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one last scan - the early brochures are so large

(9 5/8" x 12 1/2") it's difficult to get the

complete page onto my scanner

NK2000SOAFR8.jpg

brochure from the DEMAREST MOTORBOOKS collection[/img]

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LMAO with the Rhino-horn comment!

Brutal to look at car, reminds me of an late 60's Rover 2000 copy,

on second thought, no not even that, the Rover was better looking!

An insult to any NK-Nuts that fell for the Zeppelin-like lines of the real car!

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This is the car BMW also referred to as a "2004". I too laughed at the "Rhino horn" comment. Ahhh the days of not having to worry about being PC....

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Looks like the Glas sedan they built before being sold BMW probably shipped the tooling down there after they bought the company and switched the Dinglehoff facility over to BMW manufacturing Reason I say this is that the front grill housing is a Glas shape and the rear diff and springs look exactly like my GT's

Some of the experts can probably verify or correct

I did not know they had done this

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Looks like the Glas sedan they built before being sold BMW probably shipped the tooling down there after they bought the company and switched the Dinglehoff facility over to BMW manufacturing Reason I say this is that the front grill housing is a Glas shape and the rear diff and springs look exactly like my GT's

Some of the experts can probably verify or correct

I did not know they had done this

From a book titled 'BMW the complete story from 1928' by Werner Oswald that I have a copy of.

No pretence of knowing 100%, but based on the above book.

Author states the car in question was designed by "Frua of Turin" for Glas who made 13,789 examples in Dingolfing in 1967.

The tooling was then sent to Pretoria, and from July 1968 was made as BMW 1800 GL, later on becoming 1800SA or 2000SA.

Book claims body and running gear of an "Glas 1700'' (does this ring a bell with anyone?).

Book claims the body was reworked during 1973-75 time frame and was then badged either 1804, 2004.

As per book, production ended in 1975, estimated production being 12,000 examples.

Hope this clears something up, I don't know either and don't pretend to, if you can get your hands on an copy of the book, 3 photos are on page 136 if anyone is interested.

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It was my impression that it was a glas also. BMW had to do something with the dies. G

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Not a GT, just a straight Glas 1700. A picture is worth some stated amount of words.... Not a pretty car no matter who's badge is on it.

800px-Glas_1700_TS_1_JPG.jpg

std_1965_glas_coup__sedan_brochure.jpg

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Not pretty and leaf springs, but...I'd still be tempted to check it out if one came up for sale locally. I like it for the oddball factor.

Given the timeframe these were built, I wonder what other BMW parts might bolt up?

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Interesting, citing a propeller for the center of the Roundel... Was this an official advert, or some commentary added by someone later?

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Guest Anonymous

I think it's a beautiful car! I love the Glas/BMW's but was totally unaware that this one existed. I did a lot of internet research on a BMW 3000GT that I found, and found no mention whatsoever of this car.

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Wow! That was my first car. My father has a 1973 model as a company car in South Africa. The company policy was to replace after 3 years or 100,000km, whichever came first. He bought the car off the company and gave it to me as a 21st birthday present in 1976. My BMW 2000SA had a speedometer marked in kilometres per hour, as South Africa went metric in 1970.

Both the 2000SA and the 1800SA were powered by the M10 engine which powered the 2002 and the earlier 320s. The "SA" versions were also assembled in the then Rhodesia, where they were known as the BMW Cheetah.

In the late 1970s, the rear tail lights and the nose were changed to look more like a BMW. - The familiar twin kidney grill was introduced. These were called the 2004 and the 1804.

For its time, it was a very pretty car. Well, at least I thought so. It was also very fast!

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