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Refinishing Questions: Original Alloy Wheels

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My 1600 came with a very nice set of original early 2002 alloys with old dry Yokos. I had the tires removed, one wheel trued slightly and now I’ve got them over at the blasting shop to remove the poor quality top coat and the original layer lurking below.

I’ve done this process for two other sets of steel wheels, (blast, etch primer, topcoat w/Polaris, etc.) What is the correct refinishing procedure for alloy wheels?

Prime everything and paint the outside only or the whole wheel, inside, out and back? Are alloy wheels finished off with a clearcoat?

How are the reproduction wheels finished?

Thanks in advance!

Ben

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I’ve done this process for two other sets of steel wheels, (blast, etch primer, topcoat w/Polaris, etc.) What is the correct refinishing procedure for alloy wheels? that sounds right to me, we've done it that way before

Prime everything and paint the outside only or the whole wheel, inside, out and back? You can do either, but outside only is what is more commonly done

Are alloy wheels finished off with a clearcoat? Definitely, unless you have single stage paint that you want to use

How are the reproduction wheels finished? Don't know, but probably like same as above

Now, Magnesium wheels are a bit more difficult, especially the ones that are porous, but I suspect the same applies. I am not sure if power coating is an option either, maybe somebody else can comment.

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Hi Ben,

I'm by no means a pro at this but will pass on what the E9 DIY guys have done (same wheel, but larger). Most of them say if you blast, don't use sand, as it's a little abrasive for the aluminum. I think most of them do the face and related surfaces only. Many use Wurth Silver or Dull Silver (after primer), and dont clear coat, thought being that it's shinier than original. I'm getting ready to do the ones on my coupe, and that's my plan. Ball bearing turntable with plywood helps coverage consistancy. Good to see you at the Vineyards. Dave V. in NC

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turntable is a great idea. i've done several alloys. once clean of old finish, clean with a metal prep/degreaser. prime the whole wheel, inside and out. Paint the inside with a cheap Rustoleum type silvet (closest match). Save the expensive Wurth for the outsides.

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thusly:

1. good scuffing to get the loose paint off (blasting will accomplish the same thing)

2. paint both sides with "self etching primer"--comes in spray cans from an auto body supply shop--Spes & Heckler is a good brand.

3. paint the front (only) with Krylon "dull aluminum"--for authenticity, leave the back side grey and let the overspray go thru the vent holes in the wheel. That's the way the factory did it!

4. paint the front with Krylon "crystal clear"

The first paint job on my wheels lasted from 1992 until 2006...'nuff said.

BTW, I made a wheel rotisserie by placing a large roller bearing atop a jack stand. then you can hold the spray can in one spot and slowly spin the wheel.

cheers

mike

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