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RussTii

Overspray on the Tii

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The storage company decided to paint their facility and got orange enamel on my 73 Tii with the $5000 paint job. Basically trophied at every BMW Concours for the last 5 years. Needless to say I'm not too happy, especially when they want me to hand it over to a local car wash to "Buff it out". Need to get some more estimates to see what a fair price would be but I'm not inclined to hand it over to someone who doesn't paint cars and has no idea how much clear he's working with. Anybody else have similar issues ?

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Oh man that really bites...hard! I'd recommend taking it back to the shop that did the original work...that way you know it will be taken care of the right way. Good luck!

Bill

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I would second that. If that body shop that painted the car the first time is still around, I'd take it to them.

Make sure you get a careful, written estimate as well and also make sure they deal with your terms not "bring it to the local car wash to let some random person with a buffer beat on your paint"

Also be sure to look at trim/glass etc closely. Especially if you are at a concours level.

You don't want to buff the aluminum trim either, at least not too much, as it will remove the protective coating on it, which means you'll be spending hours keeping it shiny.

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I third that. Take it to the right original place to get it done like it was and save yourself a headache. Sorry about the morons..I would be mad as hell as well. Good luck Russ.

hamada

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Get 3 estimates from the best detailers you trust.

Then add your time. You're worth quite a bit, hourly...

And have your lawyer submit it, under her/his cover letter.

That usually works...

t

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Guest Anonymous

Is it bad enough that you cannot clay it out ?

I had tons of overspray from my fender repaint (self inflicted), on the glass and the rest of the body... A couple of hours with a clay bar took care of it...

I know in your case "they" did it, but I'd rather fix that myself than subject the car to a cheapo fix... It should not be too bad, really, clay is amazing stuff !

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x2 on buffing it out (clay-bar/polish/mild-solvent-that-is-non-reactive-with-your-paint).

You would be amazed at what comes out with the right polish and/or solvent.

You could choose an auto detailer that would be willing to try it, and (ahead of time, negotiate that) if it doesn't work, then the building-owner would pay for the re-spray.

//Mark

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Guest Anonymous

We had a corvette that was parked near a rain of ceiling paint. After becoming apoplectic, friend came to the rescue. He gave the car a time consuming mineral spirit/WD40 bath and 99 percent came off. A lot had to do with the fact that much of the paint dried as it fell and the car had recently been polished and waxed.

Much has to do with the type of paint the perpetrators used and the ambient conditions. If your paint was/is as good as you say, you probably had a good coat of wax on it for protection too. Find yourself a mild solvent (yes even WD-40 works) and test in an inconspicuous place. Most waxes and polishes are primarily distillates of petroleum anyway, so no harm - no foul. Maybe.

Good luck.

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I agree with first going to the shop which did the paint work. The shop will have the most knowledge about the paint used and how much paint (thickness) was applied. The shop will know how "aggressive" they can get to remove the overspray.

Sounds like you take good care of the car so the overspray may not "stick" too badly if you have a good layer of wax.

If you're inclined to do-it-yourself, try "claying" with a mild clay bar - you'll be surprised by its effectiveness on overspray when you have a good layer of wax. BTW - Detail supply shops also have "aggressive" clay bars that are more effective at removing overspray but they tend to haze the paint and thus require an additional polishing step AFTER claying.

HTH

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