• Upcoming Events

Sign in to follow this  
Biemenstien

Leaky front seal.

6 posts in this topic Last Reply

Recommended Posts

I recently performed an engine swap and while the engine was out I noticed that the tranny had been leaking at the front seal, so while everything was out I took time to replace the front and rear seals and associated gaskets.

I then, reinstalled the engine / trans, everthing runs great, lots of power smooth and tight.

But I still have a leak in the front seal/gasket?

I will be doing the bottom drop again and replacing the seal and gasket again, is there anything I can do to ensure that it won't leak again?

I don't mind dropping the sub-frame, it's not that big of a deal, however the weather is warming up and I would like to drive the wheels off this thing after getting a taste of the new found power.

Thanks.

Oh yea, I performed the seal replacement using info off the "Forum Search" and my Hayes repair manual.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How was the surface of your pulley where the seal rides?

They wear a bit, but I've seen a few that were really worn,

and that could make it leak again.

One trick is to not push the seal all the way into the front cover,

and that lets it ride on fresh metal on the pulley.

Also, you can change that seal by driving a few sheet metal screws into it

and then pulling.

It's a pain, and occasionally doesn't work, but if it does, it saves you

pulling the covers again.

I need to do mine, too...

t

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous
add a small film of permatex to the o.d. of the new seal for insurance

Permatex? On a surface that is under constant pressure and friction from a moving crank? Permatex is no substitute for the silicone material found in the seal. The seal is designed to have tension on it and as it wears the spring around the inside perimeter of the seal maintains the tension.

I am familiar with the permatex literature and have never seen any recommendation for this use of their products. May as well use a caulk gun while you are at it and have 10X more insurance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous

Thought you were advocating a sealant on the crank or the inside of the seal rather that where the seal seats into the timing case cover. Never mind!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this