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Best way to clean the engine bay?

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I have some basic dirt there....its dull....I wanna put a bit of a shone in the bay...best way? Should I just carefully wash it out with normal car wash soap? Spray wax? Power wash? Thanx....

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I have some basic dirt there....its dull....I wanna put a bit of a shone in the bay...best way? Should I just carefully wash it out with normal car wash soap? Spray wax? Power wash? Thanx....

You can if you be careful to not let the dizzy, and electronics ect get wet.

I do it all the time at the autoshop that i work at.

Unless there is some reason that i am unaware of, you should be good.

HTH,

Chris

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If you read most publications they will tell you NOT to wash your engine due to the possible damage to electronics and wire connectors.

To me, that is mainly for late model vehicles that have lots of computer controlled devices.

I've been successful using a garden hose with spray nozzle set on "shower" to lightly rinse the engine compartment, then use some soapy water and wash mitt/brushes to clean.

Don't aim the nozzle directly at sensitive areas such as the distributor and carb./throttle body.

Don't let the water pool/sit anywhere after the final rinse. Immediately start/drive the car to evaporate the leftover water (watch for the spray caused by the fan!).

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Guest Anonymous

I learned this trick from a used car dealer who prep'd cars for re-sale. Use Saran Wrap, or other sticky covering, tightly wrapped over the distributor and other electronics (relays and fuse box). Then spray on some cleaner on a warm, not hot, engine, let is sit for 15-30 minutes, and then wash and rinse off by the Jim Gerock technique (above). This works well for me. Good luck.

______________________

Roger

'72 Malaga

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The best way is to remove the engine.

Not the most practical or simple solution, but It makes cleaning

a snap :)

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Blow it dry with a leaf blower. That is how I dry my car. Clears the water from behind the chrome trim, mirrors handles etc.

Do not use compressed air, it blow things and paint off.

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Protect the alternator, too - especially if you use high pressure spray.

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"Oil Eater" is hard to beat. Just spray it on and rinse off. You can get it at some of the auto part chain-stores, some Costco stores and through Costco.com. Cheap.

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I've got a mate in the trade that swears by truck wash and a steam cleaner. Only takes a second to take out your coil and leads, bag up the distributor and avoid the loom.

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The saran wrap idea for wrapping delicate parts is brilliant; thank you for sharing.

This wash works for me when I tackle the engine room, although simple green has done the job just fine for less $$.

31l894kf9KL_SS500_.jpg

and to dry, the same air blaster I use for the motorcycle, although I wish I had thought of the leaf blower idea. Not sure the warm air from the blaster speeds drying up all that much, and you can get a leaf blower for a few dollars.

MT-B3-CD-2.jpg

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