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Guest Anonymous

SOT: permanent garage air lines

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Guest Anonymous

Hi guys,

Over Thanksgiving I'd like to run some permanent air piping around my garage and I'm wondering if anyone has any suggestions on size/type of pipe to use. I was thinking 1" id metal pipe, but I've heard that some guys use high pressure pvc or soldered copper. Any thoughts? I'm going to run it up near the ceiling and have valves every 10 or 15 feet. Thanks

-Dave

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Guest Anonymous

It was 1/2" I believe. Worked well now for a couple years.

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Guest Anonymous

Most PVC is good to 200psi. The thick walled stuff. Not the thin stuff that's used for lawn sprinklers. I believe it's PSI rating is inked on every tube if you arn't sure.

kris

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Guest Anonymous

On a large project, using 6in left over copper pipe. With 1000 ft. we wound up using the compressor only because we had what was in effect, about a 900 gallon air tank!

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Guest Anonymous

prosteve.jpg

My brothers and I over the years, in several different shops, have used 1/2" galvanized piping (like from home depot) The fittings are easy to work with(use pipe dope), and it is very durable.

Steve P. in NC

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Guest Anonymous

an article on air lines this month.

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Guest Anonymous

If you use PVC use Schedule 40, but I would go with standard steel black pipe (cheap and readily available, but it does have to be threaded).

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Guest Anonymous

from the compressor to the start of the copper line. I think for what ever type of line you run, this sort of 'soft' connection between the vibrating compressor and rigid tubing is a wise invesment. I purchased my braided hose through TIP Tools.

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Guest Anonymous

URL: http://photos.yahoo.com/bc/sgrant914/lst?.dir=/bmw

I used sch 40 pvc as well.. now mind you the pipes are on the outside of my wall. If I was putting the pipes in the wall then they would definetly be metal.

just remember when you tee off off your main line for your different outlets. Tee off the top of the line and work your way back down. that minimizes the ammount of moisture, and have your outlet a few inches above the bottom with a drain on each outlet

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Guest Anonymous

in commercial setups. Copper takes up less space, does not have the crud in it that galvanized has, can be assembled with epoxy (no sweating required!!), doesn't need custom thread cutting and is generally better looking too. MAKE SURE TO PUT IN WATER TRAPS AND A GOOD DRAIN SETUP TO PROTECT YOUR TOOLS.

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Guest Anonymous

that the galvanizing is a coating which can flake off, travel to our favorite air tool and screw it up. That is why galv is not allowed on gas (Nat'l, LP) lines. You don't want the gas line on your water heater, etc to get blocked open by debris

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