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Guest Anonymous

I am getting in over my head with this....how hard to replac

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Guest Anonymous

syncros in the later (non-porsche syncro) 4spd tranny? TIA

Brandon

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Guest Anonymous

Used ones are dime a dozen.

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Guest Anonymous

Unless you have the proper tools to work on the tranny, don't even try. You can butcher the tranny if you don't know all the secrets. G

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Guest Anonymous

It's not _that_ hard to rebuild the tranny. I did it without the benefit of the special bearing pullers that make the job easier. My advice is to get one of these dime-a-dozen trannys, then rebuild either your original or the 'new' one. Getting the bearings out is tricky, but not impossible, and the shimming must be done carefully, but it's somewhat obvious when the clearances are way off. So many of these old 4-speeds wind up on the scrapheap, there's no reason why you can't fool around with one and take it apart.

Mike

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Guest Anonymous

Not that I have years of experience or anything, but I did refresh my 232 4-speed without buying any fancy tools. The FAQ section has the brief writeup I had put together at the time. A complete set of bearings, synchros and seals cost me about $400. I made a set of bearing extractor rods out of drill rod, they are used in conjunction with a standard gear/bearing puller set; they require you to ruin the bearing that you are extracting, unlike the expensive factory-style bearing puller. However the bearings are about $70 for the two that you will ruin, and you should be replacing them anyways when you do the rebuild.

The one thing that could prevent you from rebuilding the tranny is the condition of the splines on the rear of the mainshaft, where the driveshaft coupler slides on. The older trannys had "coarse" splines, the later ones "fine" splines; the difference was somewhere in 1974. They made the switch because the coarse fitting would loosen up and wear out the mainshaft; these cost a lot of money to replace these days, I was quoted about $800 from BMW; however I noticed that some suppliers claimed to have them in the $200 range. Anyways, if you have an older coarse splined transmission, and the splines are shot, just go out and look for a '76 transmission; they were the best of the 2002 units. A 320i transmission will work as well, but there are differences in the clutch slave cylinder setup.

If you have a fine-spline unit, or a coarse-spline unit that through some miracle is in good shape, then rebuilding is worthwhile. I can post some large pics of my rebuild effort if you'd like.

Mike

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