Jump to content
  • When you click on links to various merchants on this site and make a purchase, this can result in this site earning a commission. Affiliate programs and affiliations include, but are not limited to, the eBay Partner Network.

Desmogging - What to keep, what to kill


moloko

Recommended Posts

I'm soon to begin the arduous journey of removing the smog equipment from my 1975 2002. The previous owner did a good job of hacking everything up and making a mess of the engine compartment so I'm not totally sure what's there and what isn't. The car has a 32/36 retrofitted with a manual choke.

I'm wondering what needs to be kept absolutely so that I can get everything else out of the way. I have a tii exhaust manifold to get rid of the egr/thermal reactor and I'll be pulling out the air pump too. I'm not sure what to do with the vacuum relays. From what I've read one still needs to be in place, but I'm not sure if that only applies to Solex carburetors. I'm also concerned about the vacuum advance--I think it's already hooked directly to a vacuum line off the carb instead of a relay, is this the way it should be?

Thanks for helping, there really should be an FAQ about this stuff, too.

Somewhat related: I'm looking for a place to get the rubber mounts for the air filter housing. Does anyone know a place where these are sold?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I pulled it all, including all the vacuum relays.

My carb goes directly to my advance on the dist. and the dist. retard is plugged.

Air pump, EGR assembly, air check valve, all pulled.

People say to keep the fuel vapor recovery stuff (if you have it), mine was removed for me by PO.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice to know I can pull it all then. I'll probably keep the vapor recovery because it's completely functional and I'd rather not smell like raw gas.

It's been a while since I looked, but I remember there being only one vacuum line coming off the distributor. Where exactly is the port for vacuum retard located?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Anonymous

"Pulling it all" is silly over-simplification to the original post. What is the goal in removing smog related equipment? Weight reduction? Enhanced performance? Reliability?

Sight unseen, I would think the best approach would be an attempt to return the engine to its European format which was designed to operate without most of the US required smog equipment. That does not just include air pump removal (which some advocate is not a good thing) but also increasing compression, altering carb jetting and most definitely altering the ignition advance curve. Singling out electomagnetic valving that sits on the firewall that is no longer attached to anything affecting engine operation is like reminding the Moose to remove the lint off of their antlers to make them more effective.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, I'm just removing it because the previous owner did a hack job of desmogging it himself The EGR piping from the exhaust manifold was clamped off, hoses were simply cut--it looks like shit.

I don't care about getting it to euro-spec or whatever, I just believe that ridding my engine from a bunch of needless or broken components to make it look more decent is worthwhile.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    Unveiling of the Neue Klasse Unveiled in 1961, BMW 1500 sedan was a revolutionary concept at the outset of the '60s. No tail fins or chrome fountains. Instead, what you got was understated and elegant, in a modern sense, exciting to drive as nearly any sports car, and yet still comfortable for four.   The elegant little sedan was an instant sensation. In the 1500, BMW not only found the long-term solution to its dire business straits but, more importantly, created an entirely new
    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    In 1966, BMW was practically unknown in the US unless you were a touring motorcycle enthusiast or had seen an Isetta given away on a quiz show.  BMW’s sales in the US that year were just 1253 cars.  Then BMW 1600-2 came to America’s shores, tripling US sales to 4564 the following year, boosted by favorable articles in the Buff Books. Car and Driver called it “the best $2500 sedan anywhere.”  Road & Track’s road test was equally enthusiastic.  Then, BMW took a cue from American manufacturers,
    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    BMW 02 series are like the original Volkswagen Beetles in one way (besides both being German classic cars)—throughout their long production, they all essentially look alike—at least to the uninitiated:  small, boxy, rear-wheel drive, two-door sedan.  Aficionados know better.   Not only were there three other body styles—none, unfortunately, exported to the US—but there were some significant visual and mechanical changes over their eleven-year production run.   I’ve extracted t
  • Upcoming Events

  • Supporting Vendors

×
×
  • Create New...