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Can an imbalanced driveshaft destroy a guibo?


ClayW

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The main problem is when the flanges are bent so that the bolts aren't quite straight, and it distorts the guibo a bit. (it doesn't take much)

Bring a Welder

1974 2002, 1965 Datsun L320 truck, 1981 Yamaha XS400, 1983 Yamaha RX50, 1992 Miata Miata drivetrain waiting on a Locost frame, 1999 Toyota Land Cruiser

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I've been through a few guibos for various reasons (improper installation, age, etc.) over the years and I'm curious if an out-of-balance driveshaft might be contributing.

Yes, for sure. Also, a bent flange, a loose bolt, or bad alignment of the center bearing (no preload) or side load on the Guibo ( I did this by not having the driveshaft forward enough based on the adjustment from the diff carrier.

70 M2 2.5L 

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INCORRECT INSTALLATION OF THE GUIBO

more likely :

metal installating band needs to remain wrapped

around the disk untill all nuts/bolts tightened

alternate the bolt head and nuts ,

and with washers under nuts

DO NOT USE GENERIC hardware

Special shouldered, high tensil OEM bolts only

with "fresh /new' nylock nuts - and with Blue

Threadlocker

tighten the bolts only with the center bearing up

and in place, and trans motor in correct INLINE positions.

'86 R65 650cc #6128390 22,000m
'64 R27 250cc #383851 18,000m
'11 FORD Transit #T058971 28,000m "Truckette"
'13 500 ABARTH #DT600282 6,666m "TAZIO"

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Yes, for sure. Also, a bent flange, a loose bolt, or bad alignment of the center bearing (no preload) or side load on the Guibo ( I did this by not having the driveshaft forward enough based on the adjustment from the diff carrier.

Preload? Please explain!

Or, better yet, can somebody write a quick, step by step instruction on guibo replacement? I suspect that most don't understand what can and does go wrong.

ClayW
1967 1600-2 - M42 - 1521145          Follow my project at www.TX02.blogspot.com          E30 DD Project Blog

 

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Yes, for sure. Also, a bent flange, a loose bolt, or bad alignment of the center bearing (no preload) or side load on the Guibo ( I did this by not having the driveshaft forward enough based on the adjustment from the diff carrier.

Preload? Please explain!

Well I don't have my blue manual handy right now, I'm sure CD can supply the picture, but you should be pushing the center bearing forward in the bracket before tightening...my memory is by a few mm.

70 M2 2.5L 

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Tighten only the nuts. Do not rotate the bolts.

Rotating the bolts will twist the metal sleeves in the rubber, leading to early failure.

No amount of skill or education will ever replace dumb luck
1971 2002 (much modified rocket),  1987 635CSI (beauty),  

2000 323i,  1996 Silverado Pickup (very useful)

Too many cars.

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Put the center bearing in place, put the nuts on the captive bolts.

Lightly tighten.

Then move the center bearing toward the motor, forgot the exact measurement, something around 3mm, then tighten completely.

The way I look for a misalignment in the guibo to flange, is to tighten all the bolts and nuts until there is about 1mm distance from the guibo to the flange.

Then while you are under a properly supported car, rotate the driveshaft and look for ANY flexing or change in that 1mm gap. If there is, then make the adjustments so when you rotate the drive shaft, there is NO change in that distance. Look top and bottom and side to side.

Story time - in Pikachu 1, I had a constant problem with her eating guibos. The first one failed while at 02 Fest East in Lime Rock, CT. Paul Wegweiser spent the whole day at the show trying to fix the car. We could not find a spare among 100+ cars. So we buttoned it up, drove it a few miles to Lawrence Charlemagnes house and in 15 minutes, Lawrence had a new one on and I was on my way back to Maryland.

The problem I had that took me awhile to find was a misalignment side to side. I fixed the top to bottom alignment problem but was failing to see the side to side misalignment.

Much to CD's chagrin, I put the bolts in the same direction. They are easier to get in that way and if one does back out, it stays away from the transmission case. I do only tighten the nuts, not the bolts.

"90% of your carb problems are in the ignition, Mike."

1972 2000tii Touring #3422489

1972 2002tii with A4 system #2761680

FAQ member #5

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Bill, the reason the BMW service manual wants those bolts to be installed in that particular way - direction wise - is so that, when tightening the hardware, you are not putting a twisting/rotational force up against the metal sleeves that are imbeaded within the rubber of the guibo.

This is the same reason why the instructions say to not turn the bolt heads. That said, I know what you mean about the clearance issue.... and you're right on the money about checking for the alignment of the trans. output flange and the front flange of the driveshaft. This alignment is critical, and may require raising the transmission and/or lowering the center support bearing to achieve the correct alignment when using the longer five speed transmissions in a 2002.

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02driveshaftandguiboinstall.jpg

Leave metal band on guibo while tightening nuts

only tighten NUTS while holding bolt head

alternate bolts so Nut is against metal flanges

use only BMW Special high-strength bolts

always use NEW self locking BMW nuts

only tighten Guibo nuts after aligning drive shaft

flange to trans flange - rotate slowly by hand to watch

for any run-out between flanges which will twist Guibo -

you will also hear a squeak if Guibo is being stressed

indicating out-of-alignment.

Leave drive shaft center spline nut loose and allow

drive shaft to extend or compress during Guibo tightening,

and center bearing "Pre-Loading" / tightening. THEN

tighten drive shaft spline nut last. Nothing should spin out

of alignment, or be stressed or under tension when fitting.

Except the center bearing rubber mount by 2 mm towards the motor when it's tightened.

BUY A BMW FACTORY BLUE BINDER REPAIR MANUAL-

A COPY OF THE 320i manual will work also -

it's the same sheit. BUY A MANUAL ! GO TO EBAY

'86 R65 650cc #6128390 22,000m
'64 R27 250cc #383851 18,000m
'11 FORD Transit #T058971 28,000m "Truckette"
'13 500 ABARTH #DT600282 6,666m "TAZIO"

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