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Instrument Cluster Light Bulb Replacement


patmryan

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Is there an easy way to get to these lights? The left light on my instrument cluster has burned out and as a result its hard to see the left and middle dials on the cluster. Do I have to remove the entire dash to get to these? Any direction would be helpful, because daylight savings time has me driving a lot more at night...

1970 BMW 2002 E10

Project Blog for 2002 work

http://mydrive.roadfly.com/blog/patmryan/

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No; you don't have to remove the dash to get to the cluster bulbs.

You need to remove any cardboards underneath the steering wheel column (if your car has them). Then, reach behind the cluster and unscrew the speedometer cable (it's a cylinder type knob). Then on each side of the cluster there are 2 knurl type screws that need to be unscrewed. By now, you should be able to push the cluster outwards (towards the steering wheel). You will see the tach connector, remove it (I'm not sure if this is the only connector but if there is another just unplug it.

The bulbs can now be accessed behind the cluster. Something you may want to consider is getting some white light type bulbs. They are a little higher in cost but you avoid driving with the candlelight lighting you have now.

Hope this helps!

Victor
SOLD - 1974 Automatic Sienabraun Metallic
 

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You have to pull the instrument cluster out to get at those but it is alot easier than it sounds.

There are two knobs that need to be unscrewed and removed on either side of the speedometer cable and the speedo cable needs to be disconnected also by unscrewing it, then the whole gauge cluster should slide right out (you may need to reach back and guide the wiring harness through the hole, it can get hung up) then when it it is out far enough you can just unplug the big round plug that the wiring harness is attached to and two single wires (a ground? and the tach?).

Now you can access all those lights from the rear of the gauge cluster. whenever I have the gauges out I use a 9v battery and take out each bulb and test it before I put everything back together just to make sure they all work. nothing worse than finding out another bulb is bad after you put everything back together.

Lane-O

74 Golf

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That is an excellent tutorial but keep in mind that you don't need to actually remove the gauges from the cluster just to replace the bulbs, all of the bulbs can be removed while still installed in the cluster by twisting them about 1/4 to 1/2 turn. If you do decide to remove the gauges DO NOT over tighten the screws when you put it back together, they thread into plastic (35+ year old plastic) and will strip out easily.

74 Golf

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keep in mind that you don't need to actually remove the gauges from the cluster just to replace the bulbs

Oh woh is he (she) that owns a 2002 with a clock in the cluster!

"My dad was right, it was cheaper just to buy a new car."

'75 Golf Yellow Automatic 2002 with Weber 32/36 DGAV - "Karl"

railwayKarl-1.jpg

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Thanks for the help. It doesn't sound too bad at all to replace the bulbs. I will replace all of the bulbs, since they are probably all around the same age. Does anyone have a source for these? I'd prefer to get them before I pull the instrument cluster so that I don't have to do it twice.

1970 BMW 2002 E10

Project Blog for 2002 work

http://mydrive.roadfly.com/blog/patmryan/

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  • 3 weeks later...

Thanks for all your help guys.  I got the replacement bulbs from BavAuto, and took out the instrument cluster, no problem last weekend.  Found some surprises in the rear of the instrument cluster, like broken buld housings.  Took out the gauges, fixed the trip odometer, cleaned the glass and put everything back in.Had some difficulty plugging the wiring harness back in, but I recruited my daughters friend to help me and we got it and the speedo hooked back up.Everything is working fine now and looks great!Thanks again.Pat

1970 BMW 2002 E10

Project Blog for 2002 work

http://mydrive.roadfly.com/blog/patmryan/

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  • 3 years later...
  • 6 years later...

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