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asvander

Paint advice for '73 2002.

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Hi all,

I just picked up a '73 tii that was the unfortunate candidate for a first time car painter. His results were less than appealing... I would like to drive it for a couple of years before I tear it apart for complete repaint, but need to make it more presentable in the mean time. It looks like after the failed attempt they tried to scuff the paint for another attempt, but stopped.

I was thinking of doing the needed bodywork repairs, popping out the front and rear windows, then scuff the paint b/c it is pretty smooth, and put another coat on top of the previous ones. I would probably have someone do this for me since I haven't had any auto paint experience. I've heard Maaco horror stories, but they can't really mess it up any more than it already is... I also have a friend the used to paint cars, but then I would have to buy all the painting equipment for him to do it.

Any input would appreciated. Thanks,

PS I will be selling my '74 tii, so if anyone is looking for a tii in the midwest, shoot me an email. I will be posting it in the for sale section.

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90% of a good paint job is done by the prepper before and the polisher after. Maybe what you need is a good color sanding and polish - I am assuming that you used a good quality product, and the prep work was decent, if not no need to add more bad stuff to bad, it is just going to make it worse.

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I agree. Understand that a paint job is essentially a reflection of what's underneath. The color sanding and polishing only gets rid of slight ripples and the "orange peel" texture, and can't fix flaws underneath the paint. Is the "bad" paint job because it's got flaws on the surface, or underneath? Answering that will help determine how to fix it.

For what's it's worth, Maaco painters can apply a very nice paint job, it's just the materials they use that aren't the best.

Jason

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The paint is actually smooth to the touch. There aren't very many imperfections on the body panels. Around the edges there are some flaws that need to be touched up. The paint looks really dull though, and appears to have been sanded. I'm mainly wondering if I should paint over the top of this old paint. Part of me says just to do it right the first time and be over with it. I probably won't be driving it for a few years then... I would like to get some miles on it, but still have it look decent in the meantime.

Thanks for the replies,

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The paint is actually smooth to the touch. There aren't very many imperfections on the body panels. Around the edges there are some flaws that need to be touched up. The paint looks really dull though, and appears to have been sanded. I'm mainly wondering if I should paint over the top of this old paint. Part of me says just to do it right the first time and be over with it. I probably won't be driving it for a few years then... I would like to get some miles on it, but still have it look decent in the meantime.

Thanks for the replies,

What kind of paint did they use? Single stage or two stage? Paint can look really dull if it is sanded, but a good buff will bring back the shine. Or it can look dull because it wasn't allowed to flash between coats, then it is best to wait for the bottom layer to be completely cured and color sand and polish, or it could look dull because the chemicals were not mixed properly, or it could dull and smooth because you don't have any clear. In order to define a plan attack, you need to either find out more about what they did or they didn't do, or take it to someone that is familiar with the paint process. We are all guessing here.

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when paint is sanded, it will appear completely flat, with virtually no shine. take it to a detailing shop, explain the situation, and see what they think. Without actually being there, we're just guessing.

Questions you need to answer:

When was it painted? (you call it "old" paint)

What type of paint was used? (3 most common are lacquer, enamel, urethane)

How much do you want to spend? (if very little right now, a repaint is not an option)

I'd guess that a detail shop, or someone with color sanding/buffing experience, could make you happy.

Jason

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Some areas they really made look good and missed some areas completely...but, I expected this and was not looking to lay out a huge sum of money for this car...pics below of before and after...

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