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jafcorrea

Oil leak need help !!!

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Hi All

Finally change my carburetor yesterday and when I got home I notice that the mechanic close the valve cover breather with some rubber cap, I only drove for less than 2 miles and I already connect to the new air filter, now the car is leaking oil from the oil cap, can anybody tell me how can I fix this ???

In the photo I had the breather filter on, but now is connect direct on the air filter.

post-12614-13667591935707_thumb.jpg

post-12614-13667591936765_thumb.jpg

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it may be a pressure build up in the system, a oil catch can may be the solution to the problem.

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it may be a pressure build up in the system, a oil catch can may be the solution to the problem.

How can i reduce the pressure on the system?

I was thinking to put the stock air filter assembly back, and what do you think?

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The pressure in the crank case is caused by compression gas blow-by. The only thing that you can do to reduce this blow-by is to hone the cylinders and re-ring the pistons. If the engine runs fine, I'd say leave it because it's normal for a "worked in" engine to have at least a moderate amount of blow-by.

As for oil catch cans-- very good idea. Your picture showed a filter. I'm familiar with this type of engine compartment problem.

It goes like this-- A guy looks at the throat of his carb and the surrounding air cleaner and notices that there is quite a bit of oil caked on or resting in the carb. An easy solution is to just remove the oil source-- Right? well--no-- Wrong. By installing a filter there on the valve cover you are doing no more than allowing the same vapors (that used to enter the carb through that hose and be re-burned) to just sit in the engine compartment and get all over everything. This is fine if you've got some crap heap and you don't care how dirty the engine compartment is. If you do care and don't want to constantly detail the engine-- the only logical solution is a catch can. The catch cans are really air-oil separators-- they remove the oil vapor from the blow-by air and then exhaust the cleaner air overboard. You can buy them in almost any color shape and size.

Check your local speed shop, ebay, kragen, pep-boys, or autozone or whatever-- they'll have one at least.

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take that goofy airflow blocking ting off the breather fitting on the cam cover. Route an open hose to a catch bottle ot to the ground

under the drivers side floor next to the trans.

Blocking crankcase breathing causes leaks from

many places.

goofybreather.jpg

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CD's right-

the breather really needs to breathe. Oil- laden air puffs in and

out of that breather, so the filter's trapping the oil, collecting it outside

the engine, and it's 'leaking'.

A longish (2 foot+) piece of hose running to a catch tank is good-

and you really need to vent the catch tank to air, no filter, no nuthin'.

The stock setup usually works pretty well, too...

t

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take that goofy airflow blocking ting off the breather fitting on the cam cover. Route an open hose to a catch bottle ot to the ground

under the drivers side floor next to the trans.

Blocking crankcase breathing causes leaks from

many places.

goofybreather.jpg

Hi CD

How about the second fuel filter (the one you mark in red), do I need to remove this one to?

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The pressure in the crank case is caused by compression gas blow-by. The only thing that you can do to reduce this blow-by is to hone the cylinders and re-ring the pistons. If the engine runs fine, I'd say leave it because it's normal for a "worked in" engine to have at least a moderate amount of blow-by.

As for oil catch cans-- very good idea. Your picture showed a filter. I'm familiar with this type of engine compartment problem.

It goes like this-- A guy looks at the throat of his carb and the surrounding air cleaner and notices that there is quite a bit of oil caked on or resting in the carb. An easy solution is to just remove the oil source-- Right? well--no-- Wrong. By installing a filter there on the valve cover you are doing no more than allowing the same vapors (that used to enter the carb through that hose and be re-burned) to just sit in the engine compartment and get all over everything. This is fine if you've got some crap heap and you don't care how dirty the engine compartment is. If you do care and don't want to constantly detail the engine-- the only logical solution is a catch can. The catch cans are really air-oil separators-- they remove the oil vapor from the blow-by air and then exhaust the cleaner air overboard. You can buy them in almost any color shape and size.

Check your local speed shop, ebay, kragen, pep-boys, or autozone or whatever-- they'll have one at least.

I am going to by the catch can, the only thing I don't understand is before I was using the stock air filter the engine has no leak?

Thanks for the info

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...stock air cleaner with the breather hose

attached to it ?

That's proof that the draw from the intake

on the breather relieves the pressure inside the motor

and why you didn't have leaks past already marginal

seals and gaskets.

No worry - oil leaks prevent undercarrage rusting.

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