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Guest hogpie

Back to how to diagnosis whether a rear defroster is good

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Guest hogpie

And yes we do need them up here in Oregon where from Nov to

May frost is a big issue. He says he's getting a reading of 2000 ohms across the circuit, what does that indicate to some of you more knowlegable people, any input would be greatly appreciated. I would hate to put in a new rear window and have the same thing I have now. Thanks....steve

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Whaaaap! BAM!

Esty pulls out the big guns on this one. Nicely done with the links. Frostfighter is it with the how to information.

Now why don't we have this same defrosting technology in the front glass?

Surely there's gotta be clear conducting materials at Nasa or Haliburton.

No?

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Buy that frostfighter grid repair kit, try it out, report back & share how it went. I don't think you can really evaluate how good it will work till it gets cold again. I've used similar conductive paint in a pen form to repair pc boards a few times, & it worked fine, but never tried it on a rear window defogger. All those lines are in parallel, so I'd wait till it gets cold, make note of which ones don't work, & try to paint one at a time, & see how it goes. You could also find a good used rear glass with defroster & swap it out, all these old cars have window seals dry out & crack often enough, so that's also an option.

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From an article on the 1974 Lincoln Mark IV.

The Quick Defrost Windshield and Rear Window were welcome in northern states with harsh weather, and cars equipped with this option were easily identified by the golden tint on the front and rear glass.

If recall, these cars had 2 alternators to accomodate the huge amp appetite of the quick defrost windshield.

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Here at Astroflex, the company debuted in the late 80's by providing aftermarket defroster kits.

It was using copper stripes simply glued to the window with a special tool (so they wont look nasty) and then arranged to get some routing to get an impedance.

There is a patent on that as well ;)

It was working quite good.

We were also providing a repair kit for the oem ones, it was simply a copper or silver pencil used for electronics.

The method was to apply two pieces of tape side by side next of the broken line (assuming you know how to find the break) and then apply generous amount of the pencil stuff and wait until it is dry. Remove the tapes. Done.

Sometimes a steel wool was rubbed a bit over the line because it get oxydised over time and the stuff wont stick to it.

I had the training back then...that gets me so long ago...wow...good memories, that was the good day. I was having only one car (!).

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