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PAINT - to strip to metal or not ? Please help

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Guest Anonymous

My car is about to go into the shop for a thorough repaint. All trim off, replaceing all seals, chrome, trim, etc. The shop is recommending a sand down, but not to metal, they are saying that original factory paint is the best base to use for a quality repaint. They seem to know what they are doing, but I am not convinced this makes sense.

I always hear people talk about 'down to metal' repaints.

Please help with you input. Thanks in advance for taking the time to reply.

Steve

PS - Also if anyone has a shop they are happy with in SoCal for a high quality repaint please let me know. Thanks.

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Guest Anonymous

Generally, a bare metal repaint is done on a car that has had several paint jobs in its lifetime and where there are indications of heavy use of filler/Bondo or of course, rust. If there is no rust present and you have original paint there really is no need to remove all of the paint since you are basically giving rust a chance to get its foot in the door so to speak when the metal is bare.

shermanmartinez@hotmail.com

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it's a huge expense and takes a lot of time to strip a car to bare metal...i agree with the painter...if the paint's solid, not pealing or cracking all over, it will serve as a good base for the new paint...save some time and money and trust the judgment of the place you hire to do the work

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Guest Anonymous

Thank you Sherman and Esty for your replies --- gives me much more confidence - that is how the painter put it also.

I just wanted to make sure as I want to do it right the first time, all the trim is being replaced with new.

Thank you both.

Steve

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A-R-G-H! Now I'm confused! My body shop guy said to go to bare metal, because the original enamel will expand and contract at a different rate than the urethane base/clear on top, thus weakening the bond. When I asked about painting it with acrylic enamel he said, "99% of the work we do is bc/cc. The only one who wants acrylic enamel is the post office for their trucks."

So, am I being sold something I really don't need? Is acrylic enamel good (enough)?

Kurt Strause

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A-R-G-H! Now I'm confused! My body shop guy said to go to bare metal, because the original enamel will expand and contract at a different rate than the urethane base/clear on top, thus weakening the bond. When I asked about painting it with acrylic enamel he said, "99% of the work we do is bc/cc. The only one who wants acrylic enamel is the post office for their trucks."

So, am I being sold something I really don't need? Is acrylic enamel good (enough)?

Kurt Strause

that's bad information...fully cured enamel under urethane will work just fine...if and only if you'd recently within a year + or -, had your car shot in acrylic enamel, there could possibly be problems with lifting, but absolutely not with the original paint that's been there for years...

if he knows what he's doing, he'll sand it to give it a tooth for the new paint to bond to then seal it with an epoxy or urethane sealer then spray the base, if you're doing it base coat/ clear coat...if he's using a single stage urethane, he would go from sealer to final color, then cut and buff, if that's what you want

i believe he's seeing more $ for labor

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Heh-

actually, it's a philosophical debate.

I've been burned by crap adhesion of aftermarket paint, and I've been

burned by bad adhesion of aftermarket etch primer to steel.

I'm sure most people who do this have similar stories...

When I'm doing a 'keep it 'till I die' repaint, I strip it all the way down.

The older I get, the less I do this. Life is short, lead is heavy.

On everything else, I buzz it 'till I see something that I have some trust in,

and then seal it WELL, do whatever bodywork that's needed, seal it AGAIN,

and then shoot it.

That's my philosophy.

t

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Having taken mine down to metal for repaint, I can tell you where the original primer was still under the original paint, the quality of the metal was exceptional. Where I identified potential rust issues in the works was in areas that had been worked in the past, and the painter took it down to metal and didn't use a good epoxy sealer prior to paint. If your painter is worth their salt, they'll recognize this when they go to prepping the paint. Regarding AE, some very expensive show cars are painted in AE for vintage effect. Most shops don't use it anymore because there are far more variables for them to worry about (as Esty noted), it's not as durable, and requires additional work to pull a shine. Your typically dent-fixer shop will not have touched the stuff in years. Shops restoring vintage cars to original specs still shoot it.

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