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1:18 Auto Art BMW 2002 disassembly/Anyone try this?

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Guest Anonymous

Greetings and thanks for reading this message,

I thought I'd try to mix up the presentation of my 1:18 '02 and CS coupe collection by swapping parts between a pair of AA '02's. As I have a Kyosho Chamonix Turbo, and the Auto Art version besides in the same shade, I thought it might be good to steal the alloys from a Tiilux and repaint the steel wheels to match the standard fitment seen on 99% of all late '02's.

Continuing upon this theme, I tried to remove the chassis from my Auto Art '02 turbo this morning, and received not the slightest hint that it could be pulled free of the body. Both doors were open, and yet no 'give' to speak of was detected. I removed a screw from each of the front floorpans, and another just behind the tail panel. An effort to tug free the wheel assemblies as well as the rear subframe resulted in precisely squat! I think the effort will be worth it, but d&*%#$ if I can figure out how to disassemble this tough and well-crafted piece.

If it helps, my work plan is as follows:

- remove either wheels or suspension, remove tires and mask suspension parts.

- with a length of Tamiya masking tape, form a coil of tape around the end of a small hobby paint brush.

- distibute a small amount of plastic 'dust' onto the wheel surface, exercising care to concentrate a heavy amount around the lugs and center cap. The plastic 'dust' of which I speak is nothing more that plastic sanded off of the usual Plastruct or Evergreen sheet plastic available in any hobby store. The dust prevents glue on the tape from adhering to chrome to any great extent - i. e. much easier to clean.

- take the coils of tape and transfer onto the center cap and lugs (although I might suggest using insulated wire with the wire removed for finer work like this).

- spray with Tamiya Mica Silver aerosol.

- reassemble and enjoy.

Anyhow, if anyone has had success with regards to cleanly disassembling an Auto Art BMW 2002, I'd very much appreciate your input and experiences if you'd be willing to share the same. Thanks and best regards...

Mike K.

Fraser, MI

[email protected]

'74 BMW 2002 Malaga on grey.

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Whoa, for a second there, I thought the first one was a real car! That was until, I looked at the pic of the underhood.

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Guest Anonymous

Greetings and thanks for reading this message,

I've not made a further progress on the AA '02 project, although I'll likely give it another go this evening. I appreciate the modified diecast auction links - both models were very cleverly done. Again, thanks for sharing the enthusiasm.

Junkyard dioramas can be quite interesting, although I myself have never attempted the same. Since such a heavy percentage (at least here in Michigan) are seen dead rather than alive, it is no trouble at all to form a mental image of what would need to be done to create a convincing diorama. Weathering materials would be the province of military or railroad modelers, with supplies and information relating to technique accessible either within a brick and mortar store or accessible online.

Special ideas relating to the particular way '02's expire could be both fun and somewhat sad to reproduce. While bodyshells are often cast from a zinc alloy, the chassis of most scale '02's are simply made of plastic. With the use of a Dremel Mototool or some such device, burst shock towers are well within the realm of the possible, while 'ventilated' spare tire housing may also be selectively opened up thus. A legacy of horribly conceived repairs can also be reproduced in scale - duct tape hose repairs, a bypassed heater core, broken downpipe support bracket, twisted tow eyelets, radio mountings from hell, chewed up E21 Recaros - there really is no end to clapped out '02 details that can be added!

Unlike a plastic-shelled unassembled kit, a diecast shell can be less fun to 'corrode' in scale. I think it would be fun to reproduce the carnage all '02 enthusiasts have witnessed with regards to outer rocker panel detail, perhaps including sunroof drains just for fun. Because the average shell of a diecast is both resilient (made of metal) and thick, opening up holes might be tough. I understand that baking soda mixed with glue can be used to replicate convincing corrosion 'bubbles'. Anyhow, thanks for indulging me on the topic of scale '02's.

Mike K.

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Mike - you sure know your 02 deteriorization modes... ;-)

I'd hoped I could have commented on your 02 model disassembly with a tip or idea, but I don't have that model, sorry. (maybe if you posted a pic?) Once you figure out how to make your mods, it'd be cool to see the finished model results (before/after).

Tom (aka visionaut)

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