Sign in to follow this  
Guest Anonymous

Drilled solid rotors. NE 1 who can confirm (more)

8 posts in this topic Last Reply

Recommended Posts

Guest Anonymous

that they are an improvement over un-drilled. I just got some nice 13" alloys and will probably need to look for better braking from something other than big brakes. I live in hilly/twisty-road paridise, but find the brakes fade big-time descending some of the great mountain roads around here. I've been almost unable to stop with "very" hot rotors a couple times. Just coming home the back roads at a snappy pace leaves the rotors pretty hot. I'd appreciate hearing from anyone who's using the drilled solid rotors. TIA,

Don

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous

Most people say its not worth it. I think drilled *used* to be the ticket as it let gases escape..but modern pads don't have the gas buildup problem. There is some tests that say *slotted* rotors work, but you really only need them in a race car. Grassrootsmotorsports had a good writeup on this about a year ago..I'll see if I can find the article and scan it if you want.

Maybe look at different pads..or some cooling ducts.

As for me..next set I get will probaby be frozen and slotted..just because I like going big :)

matt

'72 02

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous

into adapting some nice 6 piston motorcycle calipers for the compact approach to big brakes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous

drilling rotors will help in diffrent waye one is cooling by drilling you increase surface area allowing for more cooling surface the second Matt touched on which is gasses all breaks are bonded with resin when it super heats it becomes gas holes allow pockets for the gas to inter, last cross drilling creates a vortek with the air allowing for more air flow and cooling. It is better to drill than not to drill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous

When I went to LRP for the Memorial Day races, I did not see one cross-drilled rotor. Lots of slotted front disks, some solid vented front disks, but not one cross drilled. I could have missed the cross drilled rotors, but the overwhelming prevalence of slotted front rotors makes me think that cross drilling is not a favored technique by most race teams.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous

If I remember they were a stock replacement, bolt-on.

Don't recall where they are sold, but they were much more $$ than the stock ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous

sam_mayodan.jpg

Cross drilled rotors on a solid rotor wont do a thing for you except make you buy more rotors and pad. Cross drilled rotors crack very easialy as they can not disapate heat in the rotor very easialy. The holes are a hinderence for them. Also the holes in a non vented rotor have no where to vent too. This gas is expanding at a different rate then the rotor. I have seen drilled rotors fail with in one drivers school track sesion!! not safe, yes you are on the steat whitch means you wont check at the end of the session nor do you have corner workers to save your ass.

Gas sloted rotors do better because they do not weeken the rotor as much. however they are reduceing the mass of the rotor and that effects how it deals with heat. I have seen these unit last as little as one day on the track.

Now I am sure a bunch of you are asking what about those race teams. Well they simply chage there rotors all the time. they are after weight saveings and are useing ventalated rotors. The rotors that the big teams are useing are not off the shelf components. Yes they are in the stock box but are different.

Like the raceteams YOU need to match your brake pad to conditions. if you feel the need to max out your current setup then you need to change the pad more then the rotor. A street/track pad is more in line with what you need. Also you need to upgrade the brakeing system. 320 units fit most 13" wheels (I use that set up on the 72) also 320 rear drums will help. Not wanting to upgrade your brakes to what you need is just plane stuped. Yes you need to watch what pad you use to keep from distroying your rims and be in the right temp range for your uses. Metal Masters, my favorite, put hot chunks of metal into your rim (they melt in) and rust. Other pads such as porterfields and hawlk pads dont do that as much. yes the hawlk pads change the color of the rim somtimes and definatly the rotor. What pad are you currently running?

Sam Schultz

too many to list

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous

I used Zimmerman rotors with cast holes (less likely to crack) on my VW with 12.5" rotors. Used these with mintex track pads. It was absolutely the best setup on that car. Great in wet weather. No fade. With solid rotors I could get fade after 10-15 min on the track. This was with a much heavier and more powerfull car than an 02 though. Also depends on your driving style. The stock rotors with Metal master pads are not enough braking for me, I'm going with the vented setup as long as it fits under my 320is wheels.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this