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Guest Anonymous

Another interesting one on e-bay

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Guest Anonymous

URL: http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/1976-BMW-2002-Beautifully-Restored-Classic_W0QQitemZ4569027686QQcategoryZ42601QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

Here's a '76 for sale on e-bay. Photo of rear shock towers clearly show a patch job, and a bad one to boot. Seller was asked about it and he responded, "...they were manufactured that way."

Buyer beware.

Bob Denyer

1974 Tii

1992 E30

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Guest Anonymous

of a 2002 probably know what they are talking about (because they probably experienced the problems or knew of someone that has experienced the same problem) and also the buyers know what to look for(areas of potential rust, etc.) Another thing is that some of us 02 owners we don't have just one 02, we have two to several of them=)

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Guest Anonymous

02_autumn.jpg

(nt)

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Guest Anonymous

9d_12_sb.JPG

Bare factory perfect towers....

P1010067.jpg

Not much difference

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Guest Anonymous

On a good shock tower, you should hardly be able to see the spot welds, for one thing.

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Guest Anonymous

to check before they start to go bad? Where is typically the first place

they start to go? It's a tight space to see anything up there from the

wheel well.

Craig

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Guest Anonymous

by undercoating in the trunk.

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Guest Anonymous

55764e0e.jpg

This is where the spring perch is welded to the fender. these fenderwells came from BMW so I assume this is the way they are made.

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Guest Anonymous

02_autumn.jpg

02s that haven't had any repairs to the shock towers and you can still see them. that doesn't mean those weren't repair with spot welds, but if there were, it's not a horrible job. didn't mean to imply that the towers were unmolested in anyway...just that they didn't look that bad.

one of my parts cars had two big slabs of 3/8" steel welded over the outside of the towers...now that's an obvious and horrible patch job! i've seen (and driven) much much worse than that polaris.

another thing. i would think it would be tough to use a spot welder on the towers. unless you cut away sections to get the welder in there or spot weld with a MIG, it would be tough to get the prongs in there i would think.

not picking a fight, just wondering.

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Guest Anonymous

It cant be more than 30 min.from me at most

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Guest Anonymous

02_autumn.jpg

i've seen them go around the crown most often...but also along the spot welds. my parts car crown popped right off when i pushed the body off the subframe and shocks. and the whole lower spring mounting pad came unriveted.

per Dr. Rust (mike self's techfest anti-rust seminar) keep the insides of the tower, as in up under the upper spring pad, good and clean. that little hole will fill up with dirt and crud and trap moisture leading to spot weld rust.

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Guest Anonymous

DSC01424.jpg

But I do admit I was thinking the same thing. Looks like a nice car.

John

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Guest Anonymous

(nt)

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Guest Anonymous

Maybe I'll go look at it and you can buy it for me.

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Guest Anonymous

(nt)

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