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Guest Anonymous

Fuel delivery problem solved - thanks for advice, all!

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Guest Anonymous

For the memory-impaired, my '73 had the original Pierburg mechanical pump with a new diaphragm and I wasn't getting any fuel...so I switched to a Carter electric pump last night and voila, she started right up! I was able to stick the pump on the firewall, where it is relatively inconspicuous and is surprisingly QUIET!

Special thanks to Andrej and Sam for their input.

Now on to MIDWEST FEST

Marty

'73

Baltimore, MD

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Guest Anonymous

Mount it as close the the tank as possible. that way it can push the gas up to the carb.

Austin

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Guest Anonymous

I had a 1968 2000ti ( sidedraft weber 40 DCOE's ) with an electric fuel pump also mounted in the engine compartment, seemed to work fine for me, started right up every morning.

Tim

'74 chamonix

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Guest Anonymous

The P.O. had mounted a good pump on the firewall over the transmission. On hot Georgia days, the engine bay heat would cause vapor lock in either the line or the pump. Changed back to a mechanical pump and problem went away. If you want to stay with electric, you should put the pump in the trunk.

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Guest Anonymous

URL: http://www.schusterphoto.com/b026.jpg

our black 74 has trunk mounted pump, good idea to place filter before pump, wires are succeptable to stuff in the trunk (also note that the glass fuel filter is succeptible to getting smashed by loose stuff in trunk)

this car belongs to my brother in SF now.

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Guest Anonymous

andrej_new_york.jpg

You are absolutely correct. However, note that the Carter pump will still function with something like 6 foot lift, so I don't think it will be taxed by a firewall mounting. Mine's been there for years and works just fine.

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Guest Anonymous

..it's a temporary solution for the time being.

I plan on mounting it in the trunk, but I was just trying to get the thing to start, besides I know ANdrej has his in the engine compartment and hasn't had any problems with it (NYC summers are a lot like our Baltimore summers).

M

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Guest Anonymous

Been running a Carter for about ten years now with absolutely no problems. Mounted mine up front on the drivers side front structural member where the old metal fuel return line originates under the battery. I used this line for the supply with a filter between the pump and the metal line itself.

Earl Myers

74 2002

72 Volvo 1800ES

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Guest Anonymous

the previous owner put it in, while the car was in the state of Washington. I also had a 1971 2002 in the mid 1980's, the prior owner mounted an electric fuel pump in the trunk of that car.

Tim

'74 chamonix

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Guest Anonymous

In case of accident, did you install anything to shutoff the pump so it doesn't keep pumping fuel into a possible fire?

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