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Started pan removal today


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Ok so I started removing the rusty bits on passenger side pan today. Pleased to see the support rail is intact and still good.It looks like extent of repair will only need to go yp about a third on the footrest area which I am pleased with since I thought it was much more than that at the beginning. It looks to me those are heatshields on the inboard side? is this something that is standard?On the outboard side do you do a long bead or a series of plug welds. It looks to me that that it was folded and they ran spot welds along that length wihich means plug welds would be just as good?

pan.jpg

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'67 Derby Grey VW Beetle

'76 Inka BMW 2002

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Glad to see there's something still left to work with there. 

Nows the time to prep/treat/ preserve the entire inside of that "frame rail" as much as possible.

Blow it out from both ends with compressed air, run some kind of round  wire brush through the full length the rail (attach to a coat hanger, length of tubing, a stick, whatever.

Then treat with something, use an extension like the one shown, attach to your coat hanger/tubing/stick and go at it from both ends.

 

IMG_0410.JPG

Edited by tech71

76 2002 Survivor

71 2002 Franzi

85 318i  Doris

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3 minutes ago, lunarkingdom said:

VWScott, if you haven't already go check out my post about it I just got done doing the exact same thing and mine was pretty close to how yours looks:
 

 

I did see that and it was most helpful. I have clamps from doing pans on VWs.

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'67 Derby Grey VW Beetle

'76 Inka BMW 2002

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15 minutes ago, VWScott said:

Where is the other end? Does it run into engine bay?

Presume you're referring to that frame rail nether end.  And yes, the other end is visible just where the firewall becomes toeboard.  It also provides a perfect channel (on the driver's side) for leaking brake fluid to run into it, accelerating it's demise by rust.  Ask me how I learned that!

 

mike

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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Because I for some reason like to do everything the hard way I was planning on trying to make it look factory-ish and do a butt weld along the tunnel and back of the pan and then plug weld along the front and sill. At the end of the day I think it all needs seam sealer even on the butt welds so it probably will look about the same whether you go with plug welds or butt welds along the tunnel and rear. Up to you. I've seen both methods used and I am still potentially going to go with plug welds all around if it is looking like butt welds will be a nightmare to line up. It will all be pretty solid and my car will never be a show car. 

 

edit: Happy to see it's better than you expected! Those frame rails are pretty thick. They do sometimes rust out but you and I both got lucky in that dept. 

 

 

Edited by popovm
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11 minutes ago, popovm said:

Because I for some reason like to do everything the hard way I was planning on trying to make it look factory-ish and do a butt weld along the tunnel and back of the pan and then plug weld along the front and sill. At the end of the day I think it all needs seam sealer even on the butt welds so it probably will look about the same whether you go with plug welds or butt welds along the tunnel and rear. Up to you. I've seen both methods used and I am still potentially going to go with plug welds all around if it is looking like butt welds will be a nightmare to line up. It will all be pretty solid and my car will never be a show car. 

 

 

I was planning on butt welds on the rear,tunnel and footrest.Only are I was thinking about plug welds was along the  rocker side. Of course it hinges upon how well it all lines up like you said. My car as well not a show car.

'67 Derby Grey VW Beetle

'76 Inka BMW 2002

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8 minutes ago, VWScott said:

I was planning on butt welds on the rear,tunnel and footrest.Only are I was thinking about plug welds was along the  rocker side. Of course it hinges upon how well it all lines up like you said. My car as well not a show car.

 

I think the front of the floor pan was spot welded from the factory but someone will correct me if I am wrong. Maybe that's not your deciding factor though. At the very least the new floorpan I got from Walloth & Nesch is designed with a 90 degree flange along the sill and and a 60 (?) degree flange on the front for spot welding. I am following their lead I guess. 

 

IMG_3007.thumb.jpeg.33337726f70057b4569627c6dfd19aa4.jpeg

Edited by popovm
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13 minutes ago, popovm said:

 

I think the front of the floor pan was spot welded from the factory but someone will correct me if I am wrong. Maybe that's not your deciding factor though. At the very least the new floorpan I got from Walloth & Nesch is designed with a 90 degree flange along the sill and and a 60 (?) degree flange on the front for spot welding. I am following their lead I guess. 

 

IMG_3007.thumb.jpeg.33337726f70057b4569627c6dfd19aa4.jpeg

Along the sill I will do as you suggest but at the front I think I have to remove a little more metal than the pan has so a small piece will probably have to be welded in.I will see when I finalize how much I need to remove.

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'67 Derby Grey VW Beetle

'76 Inka BMW 2002

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4 hours ago, VWScott said:

Along the sill I will do as you suggest but at the front I think I have to remove a little more metal than the pan has so a small piece will probably have to be welded in.I will see when I finalize how much I need to remove.


Makes sense. Don’t necessarily take my suggestions though. This is my first time doing this. :) 

 

I had to do the same on the front. This is where I am at on the driver’s side. I had to go pretty far up on the left side. Just finished welding in that patch tonight. Still needs some grinding, seam sealing, etc. 
 

IMG_3043.thumb.jpeg.2403e26d67deb4e61bd580bad2fd801e.jpeg

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8 hours ago, VWScott said:

It looks to me those are heatshields on the inboard side? is this something that is standard?

No, not standard and neither is that flexi joint. Do you have a header?

Edited by tech71
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76 2002 Survivor

71 2002 Franzi

85 318i  Doris

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I also butt welded the new floor section to the original floor and transmission tunnel.

 

In 2017 I decided to just replace a small section of floor (which I made a replacement panel for myself)

But later on I cut it out again and replaced the full front floor section that I got from W&N.

(Yes, I'm still replacing panels since then.. )

 

You can find pictures here:

 

 

 

 

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