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Alternator Belt Tension, Bushings?


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I installed a Bosch rebuilt alternator mid last summer, bought from one of the reputable suppliers, set tension and checked after ~50 miles and all was well through the Fall. I had reused the same belt as it only had ~2k miles on it as does the motor.   Start doing some winter work and I notice the belt is markedly loose, but the adjusting and pivot bolts are sufficiently tight.  Only thing I can think is that the bushings compressed and took a set, which is fine if this adjustment takes care of that.  Has anyone else noticed this??  Typica; behavior or just the generally craptastic quality of current replacement components?

 

This is the only car in the fleet w/ alternator bushings and a v belt...the British stuff is too primitive for bushings.

Edited by wingswheelshulls

1974 '02 Golf 'Gabby', few Porsches and leaky British things.

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The belt itself will stretch a bit and as it's used at first it may pull deeper into the v grove on the pully.

If everybody in the room is thinking the same thing, then someone is not thinking.

 

George S Patton 

Planning the Normandy Break out 1944

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5 minutes ago, Son of Marty said:

The belt itself will stretch a bit and as it's used at first it may pull deeper into the v grove on the pully.

But it will change less than a new belt would.

A radiator shop is a good place to take a leak.

 

I have no idea what I'm doing but I know I'm really good at it.

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Thanks.  I would have thought the belt would have been stretched from use already but the 'deeper in the pulley' is an excellent point.  The new pulley was painted so the belt will eventually run a bit deeper as it wears in. 

 

I've been stung enough by replacement parts quality, and I am very selective with who I buy from, that I may be overly pessimistic.  

Edited by wingswheelshulls
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1974 '02 Golf 'Gabby', few Porsches and leaky British things.

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The alternator mount bushings that came with the rebuilt alternator:  were they the original OEM rubber?  If so, they will compress, thus causing slack in the belt--and in a shockingly short time turn to black goo (similar to the OEM rear tranny mount). 

 

Replace the alternator bushings with urethane ones; they'll last (almost) forever, and won't compress, allowing the belt to stay tight.  However, they can be kinda bitchy to install, as they don't readily compress, while the rubber ones do.  You'll probably need a big bench vise to compress the bushings sufficiently for the circlip to snap into place.  I did a column on this process if you need it.

 

mike

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'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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1 minute ago, Mike Self said:

The alternator mount bushings that came with the rebuilt alternator:  were they the original OEM rubber?  If so, they will compress, thus causing slack in the belt--and in a shockingly short time turn to black goo (similar to the OEM rear tranny mount). 

 

Replace the alternator bushings with urethane ones; they'll last (almost) forever, and won't compress, allowing the belt to stay tight.  However, they can be kinda bitchy to install, as they don't readily compress, while the rubber ones do.  You'll probably need a big bench vise to compress the bushings sufficiently for the circlip to snap into place.  I did a column on this process if you need it.

 

mike

Appreciate that!

1974 '02 Golf 'Gabby', few Porsches and leaky British things.

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